The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Effects of proofing on scoring?

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jcamador's picture
jcamador

Effects of proofing on scoring?

So the loaf on the left was proofed about 75% and the one on the right was fully proofed. I noticed that the scoring on the left was jagged, whereas on the fully proofed loaf on the right it was smooth and crisp. Is there a direct correlation between the degree of proof and the resulting physical characteristics? Any ideas would be helpful..Thanks!

 

wally's picture
wally

To be honest, I don't see enough difference to accord anything to proof time (maybe a little extra height on the right, but hard to tell for sure).  Could have been your scoring.  My question is, when you say the first loaf was 75% proofed, what are you saying?  Did you set out in advance a time limit for proofing, and then score one loaf at 75% of that time limit, while allowing the other to go the entire time?  "Fully proofed" (outside of a controlled manufacturing environment) is highly subjective.

Larry

jcamador's picture
jcamador

To be honest, I say 75% proofed but it is just a guess. I started proofing both at the same time, but since I could only bake one at a time I am just guesing that the first one in the oven..the one on the left was about 75%. I just purchased a Brod and Taylor proofer (which is excellent) and am playing around with proofing times. But I think you might be right, it is probably just a difference in scoring technique. Thanks for the reply!

Franko's picture
Franko

At what stage your proofed dough is at, and how it's scored (and steamed) are directly related in terms of physical characteristics. Sometimes even a slightly over-proofed loaf can look acceptable if it's lightly scored, but a slightly under-proofed (75%+/-)  loaf scored shallow is more likely to result in a split or blowout ...not a good thing. It depends on the surface tension of the dough and what effect you want to achieve, hydration, formula, flour, and  ultimately experience with the dough, deciding how and when it should be scored for best effect. Not knowing what your formula and procedure are for this bread, my best guess is it's a lean French or Italian style country loaf of some kind. The big rip , as I call it, with strands of the interior dough being pulled upward to the crust seems to be what most folks prefer. It looks good, gives better overall caramelization to the crust, but the crumb can suffer if you slash too soon. Of the two loaves presented, I 'd say the one on the left has a better look.

Franko