The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sprouted Wheat, Oat Flour Sourdough

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isand66's picture
isand66

Sprouted Wheat, Oat Flour Sourdough

I just received my new order from KAF the other day and was dying to try some of my new flours I ordered.  I wasn't too happy though when I received an email the day after it arrived telling me how excited I should be about the KAF 20% off sale!

Anyway I digress....I decided to try my new Sprouted Wheat Flour which was not milled by KAF but apparently they distribute this brand.  I also used another new interesting flour which was made from 100% oats.  Along with these 2 flours I added a large amount of French Style Flour which added to the silkiness of this dough.  I have used this flour many times before and it is great for baguettes or ciabatta but I also find it very nice for developing the nice open crumb I like.

I refreshed my standard AP white starter the night before and used most of it in this bake.  I have also included the ingredients to make the exact amount of starter needed from your seed starter.  Mine is kept at 65% hydration so adjust yours accordingly.

The final dough was a nice mild sourdough with a hint of nuttiness from the oat flour and sprouted wheat flour.  The crumb was not too moist and had a nice open crumb and overall this was a nice bread worth making again for sure.  I used it for a nice pastrami sandwich last night which I ate while tailgating at the Brad Paisley concert at Jones beach.  I am not a big fan of country music by I do have to say he puts on a great show.  Could have done without the rain storm and cold winds in June but we all had fun anyway.

Starter

71 grams Seed (Mine is 65% AP Flour Starter)

227 grams AP Flour

151 grams Water (85 - 90 degrees F.)

Mix seed with water to break up for a few seconds and then mix in flour until the starter form a smooth dough consistency.  Put it in a lightly oiled bowl and loosely cover and leave at room temperature for at least 10 hours.  The starter should double in volume.  Put the starter in the refrigerator for up to 1-2 days or use it immediately.

Main Dough

Ingredients

425 grams Starter from above (all of the starter)

200 grams French Style Flour

200 grams Sprouted Wheat Flour

167 grams Oat Flour

425 grams Water (90 degrees F.)

18 grams Sea Salt (or table salt)

Procedure

I mixed  the flours together with all the water except for 50 grams and let them autolyes for 1 hour.    After an hour  I added the levain and the water with the salt and mixed on speed #1 for 1 minute and #2 for 4 minutes.  I then did a stretch and fold, rested the dough uncovered for 10 minutes.  I then did another stretch and fold, covered the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.  I did one more stretch and fold and put it in a lightly oiled bowl for 1.5 hours.  I then put it in the fridge overnight.

The next day I let the dough sit out at room temperature for 1.5 hours.  After 1.5 hours I formed it into loaves and put them in floured bannetons and let them rise covered for 2 hours.  Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

I then baked on my oven stone with steam at 450 degrees until both loaves were golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 - 210 degrees F.

I got a nice bloom with my scoring, actually more than I expected.  One loaf I tried a curved scoring pattern which came out pretty nice.

It was so nice outside yesterday I decided to shoot the finished loaves outside in my garden.  The summer flours flowers are just starting to bloom in earnest making this one of my favorite times of the year.

 

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

new and the modified center toe T-Rex slash.  Both show your curvy slashing side well :-)  I am running out of malt so now is the time to make some sprouts and turn some if it into sprouted flour instead of malt to we can experience the different flavor it produces.

I like using oats in bread to help the lift and spring (like potato flakes) and I always grind it into flour rather than just tossing the rolled oats in the dough.  I don't know why I grind them into flour other than when I'm grinding all the other grains so why grind the oats too!  I sometimes put oats and potato flakes in starter feeds to to give the little ones a treat now and again.

This bake produced a much less dark brown color than your recent bakes and that must be because of the oats and other flours you used.  Very good looking bread for sure.  Just wish we could tasted it.   Love the outdoor shot too.  Nothing like a summer garden.  Nice bake Ian  

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA....I was very happy with the way this turned out.  I'm finishing a nice pastrami sandwich using the last of it now.  I gave one loaf away to some friends, but now I wish I had saved it....

Figured I would try something a little different with the slashes and was pretty happy with the results.

What do you use to grind your oats and other grains?  Do you have a mill or just a coffee grinder?  I have a coffee grinder somewhere in my house, but I can't seem to locate it.

I'm working on a new version of corn bread using fresh roasted corn and Ceso Mexican cheese.  I also used the corn flour in the starter along with some rye and AP flour.  I added some French Style flour in the final dough so I'm hoping this one will be even better than the last.

We will find out tomorrow hopefully.

Thanks again for your comments.

Regards,
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a Krups coffee grinder.  Since I only bake 1 loaf at a time and you want your freshly ground flour fresh, it works fine for me.  I'm not sifting though.  

I wonder if smoked malted flour makes the bread taste like it came from a WFO if used in the proper amounts?  We will have to see next time w smoke something - will do some sprouted seeds at the same time and see.....

isand66's picture
isand66

I await your experiment

varda's picture
varda

Ian,   Your bread looks terrific and your formula seems nice and well-balanced.    Love the hints of your garden creeping in -- Lungwort, Frances Williams hosta (?) and you've got me on the purple daisy-like flowers - seems too early.   -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Varda...I don't remember the name of the hosta...I have many varieties.  My wife and I are both serial gardners.  We both like  to visit different nurseries each season looking for new and different perennials.  I have lost track on how many different ones we have.  Just planted about 8 different new cone flowers.  

The pink flower is a painted daisy.

 

Regards

Ian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Ian,

It might not be too late to cash in on that 20% off.  I know I placed and order with another company about a month ago and the next day they posted a sale too.  I called to ask if I could slip in under the wire and they were happy to let me but my order hadn't shipped yet so the circumstances were a bit different.  I do know KAF is pretty generous tho...

Your loaves look great and I like the T-Rex slashing too.  I forget to add oat flour to my breads but when I do the kids really like it so now I will make note and get some in the next loaf I make for us to keep.  They like barley flour too but I forget that too.....

Your flowers are lovely.  Things here are just beginning to bloom.  I planted some 4 o'clocks today. I don't plant many perenials anymore due to our climate.  They have a nasty habit of either loving the space I have for them or else they stick around for a year just to let me know they are trying and then they disappear during the winter....I think they pack their bags and leave under the cover of darkness so as not to upset me with their parting.  They know it will be months before they are missed :-)  I now do annuals in pots for color but keep it to only a few pots or the expense gets to be too much....I do love a garden full of flowers though and yours sounds lovely.

Thanks for the reminder about oat flour!

Take Care,

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Janet....I do find the oat flour to add a nice nutty flavor and color to the bread.  I just finished the last piece for breakfast and wish I had some more!

Where do you live that it's so cold?

I always lose some pereniels each year and usually after trying the same flower a couple of times I add it to the "Do Not Buy" list, but for the most part we are fortunate that a majority of the plants survive the winter.  Hopefully you can find some in the future that may work for you.  You can also put heavy mulch, like straw or wood chips down to protect them in the winter, as that sometimes will help.

Anyway...thanks for the kind words.  Oh, and I think I'm too late to call KAF at this point.  At least I had a 10% coupon code so all is not lost :).

Regards,
Ian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Colorado-

Dry and cold especially in the winter.  I do cover with mulch etc. but do not water as I would have to carry buckets around which I do not do.....My gardening philosophy is 'If it grows it stays. If it doesn't move on to something else.'  Told to me by a wise old gardner years ago.  I love flowers but do not like working in the garden so it has to be easy :-)

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

After all the work I did on the garden yesterday I can understand where you are coming from!  I do actually enjoy the gardening though...

Thanks.

Ian