The Fresh Loaf

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Semolina Toasted Almond Multi-Grain Bread

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isand66's picture
isand66

Semolina Toasted Almond Multi-Grain Bread

I was inspired to try adding some balsamic vinegar into one of my breads after reading about Karen Hanseata's Wild Rice bread on the Fresh Loaf this past week.  I have some cherry balsamic  that I love using so I was curious to see if it would have any affect on the taste of my bread.

While looking for some different components to add to my next bake I discovered that my wife had stashed some Toasted Almond Flour in the refrigerator so I figured why not give it a try.

I also used some Potato flour and Durum flour along with some hickory smoked sea salt and assorted all natural grains for this bake.

I cut back on the hydration slightly from my previous multi-grain breads and not counting the 359 grams of water used in the soaker it comes in at only 56%.  There is no doubt that the water from the soaker makes the final dough much moister than 56%.  I also did not count the soaker grains as part of the flour.  According to the BBGA (Bakers Guild of America) soakers including the water and other ingredients should be considered "hydration neutral".  This is obviously a difficult concept to control but none the less that is the prevailing rule in the industry.

For this bake I made a boule as well as a circular shape similar to a large donut.

The final dough came out very tasty. You can see the toasted almond flour imparted a slightly orange tinted color in the crumb and it gives it a very nutty flavor.  I can't say that I tasted the cherry balsamic vinegar but I'm sure it added to the overall flavor profile somehow.  The crumb is nice an open and moist and you can see some of the soaker grains melded together.

If you venture to try this, please let me know how your attempt comes out.

Ingredients

Soaker

28 Grams English Malted Flakes

60 Grams Bulgar Wheat

55 Grams Organic Oat Bran

55 Grams Cracked Wheat

285 Grams Boiling Water

Final Dough

425 Grams White Starter recently refreshed (65% Hydration Seed Starter)

200 Grams Durum Semolina Flour (KAF Brand-make sure  you don't use the Fancy Semolina flour which is too gritty)

250 Grams Bread Flour (KAF)

58 Grams Toasted Almond Flour (KAF)

35 Grams Potato Flour

14 Grams  Hickory Smoked Seas Salt or Table Salt

264 Grams Water, 90 degrees F.

12 Grams Cherry Balsamic Vinegar (Feel free to substitute any Balsamic you have or just add more water)

Directions

Mix all ingredients for soaker in a bowl and add boiling water.  Let it sit for 2-3 hours covered until the grains are soft.  (I actually only let it sit for 1 hour which was long enough).

Add the water and flours into your mixing bowl and mix for 2 minutes on low.  The dough should come together in a shaggy mess and should be relatively moist at this point.  Let it rest (autolyse) for 25 minutes and then add the salt, balsamic vinegar and the soaker and mix for 4 minutes more on medium low-speed.  If necessary you can add some additional water or flour but be careful not to make the dough too dry.  It should be relatively sticky but not soupy.

Remove dough from mixing bowl to work surface and do a stretch and fold.  You may need to wet or oil your hands and the work surface since the dough will still be very sticky at this point. Form the dough into a ball and let it rest uncovered for 10 minutes.  Let the dough rest uncovered for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes do another stretch and fold and cover the dough with a moist lint free towel or plastic wrap sprayed with non-stick cooking spray.  Do another stretch and fold two more times letting the dough rest 10 minutes each time.

 After the last stretch and fold put the dough into an oiled bowl and cover it tightly.

Let the dough sit in your bowl for 2 hours at room temperature.  It should only rise slightly at this point.  After the 2 hours are up put in your refrigerator for at least 12 hours or up to 3 days.

When ready to bake the bread take your bowl out of the refrigerator and let it sit at room temperature for around 2 hours.  After 2 hours shape the dough as desired being careful not to handle the dough too roughly so you don't de-gas it.

To make the circle bread I formed half the dough into a cylinder and formed it into a circle.  I placed a small glass bowl in the middle wrapped in plastic wrap that I sprayed with cooking spray to prevent it from sticking to the dough.  I placed the dough into a large banneton and let it rest per below.

Let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours covered with oiled plastic wrap or a moist cloth.

Pre-heat oven with baking stone (I use one on bottom and one on top shelf of my oven), to 500 degrees F.

Slash loaves as desired and place empty pan in bottom shelf of oven.

Pour 1 cup of very hot water into pan and place loaves into oven.

Lower oven to 450 Degrees and bake for 25 - 35 minutes until bread is golden brown and internal temperature reaches 200 degrees.

Shut the oven off and leave the bread inside with the door slightly open for 10 minutes.  This will help dry the loaves out and keep the crust crunchy.

Let cool on cooling rack and enjoy!

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

What an interesting bread.  Would you mind if I featured it on the home page for a bit?

-Floyd 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Floyd.  I would be honored.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

deserves front page status!  We really did think that it was a bagel when we first saw it but then when it was sitting int the couche it was even more impressive.  What a great bake Ian.  Love the gloss on the open crumb,  the   bloom and color of the crust.  The variety of the soaker is unique and it comes through in the crumb nicely.  If it tastes half as good as it looks it is one fine bread.  Can't wait to gussie it up some not that Gus needs it :-)

Congrats again on a fine 'Cover Bake' Ian

Wait till you see my suprise for you on your first cover day!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA!

I look forward to seeing your surprise.

I could go for some of your ribs for sure.   I was saying how I need to smoke some ribs and pulled pork myself!

 

Franko's picture
Franko

Very nicely done Ian!

The full frontal shot of the crumb :^) shows it off so well for it's moist and chewy looking interior, it said flavour even before I read your formula. Does the hickory flavour come through in the baked loaf, and how does it match up with the flavour of the grains? I'm curious, because I love the taste of hickory in BBQ and bacon and have wondered how it might work in a bread . Hickory smoked bacon bread I've had, and it was great, but take away the bacon and I have trouble imagining the flavour. Congrats on your well deserved front feature!

Cheers,

Franko 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Franko,

The hickory flavor from the sea salt unfortunately does not really come through at least from what I could tell.

I definitely want to try a formula that would get some smokey flavor in a bread...just have not figured out the best way as of yet.

Appreciate your kind words.

Regards,

Ian

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hey Ian,

Congrats on the font page!

Some pretty amazing flavour combinations in that wonderful looking bread ... and that's how a seeded bread should look ... jam packed! 

Nice work.

Cheers,
Phil 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Phil,

I appreciate the compliment.

Regards,

Ian

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Hi Ian,

I was immediately intrigued by the wonderful photo on the front page - great shaping (I especially like the giant doughnut/bagel), and a great blend of flavours in the baked loaf too, I'm sure. Wonderful baking.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for the compliment...I appreicate your kind words.

Regards,
Ian

Syd's picture
Syd

That is a lovely looking bread with a very inviting moist crumb.  I bet that makes a very good sandwich.  Very creative and excellent baking.


Syd

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Syd...it does make for an excellent sandwich and breakfast bread as well!

Appreciate the compliment.

Regards

Ian

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Just put a plastic-wrapped cup/jar in the center.

See my exceptionally poor solution here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/28468/pane-del-consorzio-del-formaggio-parmigianoreggiano

#failuredefined!

isand66's picture
isand66

I don't think your solution was that bad :).

Mine wasn't that much different.....like I like to say...what ever works!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

On your front page post!  What an interesting and moist looking 'ring loaf' as I believe this shaping used is most commonly called.  I love all the grains, especially the added bulgar and semolina.  I like very much how nicely the ring loaves slice.  

It reminded me of a few months back I was experimenting making my formula for an Italian Ring loaf with a biga naturale and also added the bulgar wheat, it turned out nicely and I want to make it again with durum flour.    

When I shaped it... I just gently pushed my hand/fingers into the center and stretched it into a ring, being careful not to deflate it.  I found it easier and worked better than my first experiment of a hugh miche size and shaping it into a log and joining.  I even tried setting it on top of my proofer to proof it and covering it with a large piece of plastic over the whole proofer.. it worked and proofed nicely in the warm enviroment...it was over 4 lbs.  So next time I divided and made my two nice sized Italian Ring Loaves pictured.

Sylvia  

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Sylvia!

Your method sounds like it works just as good as mine.  I did the log rolling method, but next time I will try yours.

Yes, I think "ring" loaf is probably better than big donut shaped loaf :).

Thanks again for your comments.

Regards,
Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Pretty exotic bread, Ian, flavor and form..! Very bold of you, and creative too. This bread could be my ultimate comfort food/snack.

Well done! Now that iam in india, and you are back home, you got me lusting over home made treats! I guess its my turn now.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for the kind words.

How long are you visiting India?  Business or pleasure?

Another guy in my office goes there every year or so to visit factories that make soccer balls but I have never been there before.

I hope you can at least find one or 2 places to enjoy a good meal..

Good luck.

Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I'am in south India, receiving traditional medicine treatment (ayurveda), for my ailing back. Food is great though.

isand66's picture
isand66

Sorry to hear you, but I feel your pain.

I had spinal fusion surgery about 6 years ago for my back.

What kind of treatment are you receiving? If you don't mind me asking...

I hope it's working!

 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Ian,
Congratulations on your front page post :^) - well deserved - quite a list of healthy-and-flavorful things in your loaf and this bread sounds delicious! (especially the toasted almond...!)
I really like the shaping of your ring bread and it prompted me to try something different in my Dutch Oven.
I wanted to try an "O"at and Honey Sourdough version of my Shepherd's Bread - tried shaping an "O" by poking a hole in the center of a boule and placing a cake core in the center, left in place during proofing and baking (loaf was proofed in the Dutch Oven):
 

Thanks for the ideas, ingredients and shaping-wise! Your bake is lovely.
:^) breadsong

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for the kind words.

I love your version too and I'm so happy I inspired you.

I will have to give your technique a try!

Regards,

Ian

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Ian
I meant to say, when removed the lid from the DO partway through baking, the cake core had lifted and gone a little bit sideways, due to the rising dough. Next time, I'll weigh the cake core down (put something non-combustible inside, or on top) and see how that works.
:^) breadsong

isand66's picture
isand66

Sounds like a plan!  I love your scoring...it almost looks like you used a bundt pan.... My wife has every bundt pan created in the last 20 years I think....I have been thinking about using one to make a bread but have not gotten around to it yet.  Have you ever used one before to make bread?

Ian

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Ian,
Thanks! re: scoring :^)
I haven't baked bread in a bundt pan, but really like the idea!

A friend of mine attended a baking course on French and Alsatian baking, and one of the breads she baked was a kugelhopf.
She passed along this tip to me from the class, on shaping:
"Make an even center hole in the dough, and place it nicely inside the mold. Press down/tuck down the dough around the center tube to make sure the dough is nicely pressed in (should not be loose and  hanging around the tube but nice and tight). You will get nice and beautiful product at the end of the bake."

Some of those bundt pans have beautiful patterns and if you bake a loaf in one, please post a picture!
:^) breadsong

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks breadsong for the tips.

I will give it a try real soon and post the results.

Regards,
Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Beautiful scoring by the way!

I love it,

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Ian. The treatment is basically 1 month, divided into 4 different weekly treatments. The first is where they pour warm medicated oil all over your body, but the head. Second week, is called bundle massage, where a bundled sac that contains herbal medicines, is warmed in medicated oil and applied to all body, but the head. Third week, is where they apply warm medicated oil to your ailing part of the back, continuously replacing the oil with warmer oil to maintain temperature. Fourth week is where the oil is applied to your head. All treatments last from 45 min to an hour.
Iam in week two, and feel a recovery of 30% so far.

I hope i wouldn't need a surgery as you did. How is your spine now? Do you feel any pain now?

Thanks for asking.

isand66's picture
isand66

That sounds very interesting and I hope it works for you.

Surgery should be your last option for sure.

I am able to garden and play sports like golf which I love so for me it was worth it.

I still have pain if I over do it and when I travel overseas sitting on an airplane for 16 hours will set it off.  I am getting older as well, so I'm not as limber as I used to be.

Before the surgery I could never drive in a car for more than an 1 hour without my back feeling like someone was stabbing me with a large knife.  With my job I had just taken a new position and I would have to fly to China several times a year which would have been impossible if I didn't have the surgery.

I had tried other therapy options and none were working anymore so this was my only choice left.

I really hope your treatment helps you.  Please let me know in a month or so how you are feeling.

Good luck!

Regards,
Ian

Juicer's picture
Juicer

I'm new to the site and this is my first discovery.  What a way to start.  This looks outstanding and I'm ready to get started.  Thanks for publishing this!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you Juicer!~

I appreciate your kind words.

Good luck exploring the site.  I have only barely scratched the surface myself exploring as there are years worth of amazing recipes and tutorials.

Hope to hear from you again.

Regards,

Ian