The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Spring Sunflowers

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Spring Sunflowers

This is a sourdough loaf that I saw Sourdough-guy do last week. It looked so good I just had to try it. I used my "basic sourdough" formula and folded in the seeds at the end of the 48 hour bulk ferment. From the looks of sourdough-guy's compared I would say I could have put more seeds in although it seemed like a lot at the time. (very scientific approach here). The flavor is incredible and the toasted seeds are bumped up a notch from the baking. 450F for 30 minutes.

Thanks for the inspiration sourdough-guy, in the end I used a similar method of planning and it worked out pretty well.

Eric

Susan's picture
Susan

And I wish I had that end slice in front of me right now.  I love boules, you get four ends!!!
Susan

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Susan,

It did turn out well for my first try using sunflower seeds. I just couldn't force myself to put in the 50% by weight that sourdough-guy suggested but in the end I could have and will next time. My daughter is begging me to sell these things they are sooo good. Kids don't understand the concept of retirement very well.

I did try two baking methods. The one in the post was baked on a steel pan with a splash of water in the oven and I also did one "under glass". The under glass loaf didn't brown up quite as well for some reason. I left it under the bowl at 450 for 12 minutes and then another 18 with a probe plugged into it. When the temp hit 203 I benched it like the others and it's 2 shades less Carmel colored but still fine in every other respect. I went back to the original method for the last loaf and it was like the first in appearance. Any ideas why that happened? The french bread footballs colored up perfectly and rose like gangbusters, which is what I was hoping would happen here.

Thanks for your words of encouragement, I'm refreshed!

Eric

Susan's picture
Susan

It really is beautiful and yummy looking.  
Who'da thunk:  Here we are in a high desert/alpine climate and it's raining cats and dogs!
So far, I leave my loaves under glass until they start to turn brown, usually between 12 and 18 minutes.  I love all this trial and error; makes learning fun.
Susan