The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

problems for a Newbie

netrider's picture
netrider

problems for a Newbie

Can anyone advise me where my problem may be.....my finished bread looks great (I do a multigran loaf) but the bottom 1/3 looks doughy and undercooked. Is it the oven or my dough. I do a machine prep then raise, hand kneed then raise again. I use a multigrain mix with packet yeast and bread improver.

Thanks...Mike

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Hi Mike,

What is your oven?  At what temperature do you bake the bread?  Where in the oven do you put the loaf?  Is it in a pan or free form?  Anything else you can tell us about the oven or your process?

Jeff

netrider's picture
netrider

Hi Jeff...thanks for your reply - It's and electric oven. I don't have any option but to use it as fan forced. I set it at 180C for 25mins cold start. The loaf 500g is placed freeform in the centre of a baking tray (not a loaf tin) in the centre of the oven.

As I'd mentioned I use a multigrain mix with packet yeast and bread improver and work the dough twice.....it always comes out with some form of doughiness at the bottom.

 

Regards

Mike

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Mike,

You are not baking the loaf all the way through.  Raise your oven temperature to 220°C, preheat the oven for 15 minutes and then put your loaf in for 35-40 minutes.  If you have an instant read thermometer, check for doneness by taking the temperature of the middle of the loaf at the end of your bake.  The internal temperature of the bread should be between 91 and 96° C.

Jeff

netrider's picture
netrider

What a guy.....I've just taken a loaf out so I'll put it back in for another 10mins....and I need to get a thermometer...do you have a digital one? My next loaf I'll modify the cooking to your suggestion and let you know how it went....Thanks immensley.

Regards...Mike

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

First, get an all-metal oven thermometer. Put it in your oven on the center rack. Preheat your oven, watching it to see how long it takes your oven to get to 180C, 220C and 250C. Now you'll know your needed preheat time, as well as whether your oven's thermostat is accurate. If your oven's inaccurate, you can continue to use that thermometer to correct for it.

Second, preheat your oven to a higher temp (I like 250C) before baking, and then after loading your loaf, reduce the temperature to your desired baking temp, e.g. 220C.

Third, get an instant read thermometer like Jeff said; after, say, 35 minutes baking(5-10 min. less for smaller or narrower loaves, and a tad more for larger ones) remove your loaf from the oven, close the door so as not to lose heat, and insert the probe to the center of the loaf , and leave it in for a minute or so, until it stops changing the temp. It should be in the range Jeff mentioned. At this point, the loaf will also sound hollow when thumped with your palmon the bottom of the loaf. If the loaf is browning too early on top, just cover it with foil and/or move to a lower rack.

I hope this helps -- good luck!

netrider's picture
netrider

Thanks Jeff and DB...you guys are unreal....the loaf from yesterday was certainly my best cooked so far - pretty well cooked throughout. You were certainly on the money as far as cooking times/temp was concerned Jeff. The instructions in my cook book were way out based on what you pointed out. I'd also read several bread making books from the local library and none had pointed out an appropriate oven checking procedure DB...those should be on the first page of any good cook book - so I appreciate the heads up on that. I'll be better armed for the next session. I'm looking forward to it. While I'm new to the baking thing I'm keen to progress to the next stage when I get confident at this loaf....there is a satisfying edge to the creation....

Thanks...Mike