The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Loving Nancy Silverton's Pizza Recipe

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mrosen814's picture
mrosen814

Loving Nancy Silverton's Pizza Recipe

I think this is about the 3rd time I've used this pizza dough recipe by Nancy Silverton, and it seems to get better and better each time. 

I modify the recipe slightly, by resting the dough overnight in the fridge, and omitting the wheat germ (I just didn't have it on hand).

This is what I topped the pizza with:

  • Pesto
  • Caramelized onion
  • Mozzarella
  • Australian Feta
  • Grilled mushroom
  • Olive oil
  • Sea salt
  • Chili flakes

http://www.dotchew.com/dinner/leftovers-make-great-pizza/

Frosty's picture
Frosty

Great timing.  I'm making Pizza this Saturday, and while I typically use a dough from "American Pie" I've decided to use the Mozza recipe.  I checked the cook book out from the library and it looks great.

I hope mine turn out this good!  Your crust looks fantastic.

Frosty

mrosen814's picture
mrosen814

Thanks. You will enjoy. I think it's a pretty solid recipe.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I bought The Mozza Cookbook, but returned immediately once I realized the pizza crust recipe was not the one she makes at Mozza.

I read over it, but it just looked like a garden-variety crust.

Maybe I was too hasty and should at least have tried it.

Thanks for the link.

Maybe I will try it sometime soon.

Nice pics too!

mrosen814's picture
mrosen814

Adding a long, cold fermentation helped with flavor development. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Nancy's recipe's have always worked well for me.  Some day I will make her olive bread but will make the pizza first I'm guessing :-)

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

I think you will enjoy the Olive Bread. I combined the Rosemary Olive Oil recipe with the Olive Bread and it was really good.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

just a great idea!  It would be a great bread combined like that - the flavors all go together so well.  Thanks

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Very potent stuff is.

1/3 teaspoon maximuminmals.

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

 Thank you for responding to my error that could have been a disaster to someone's bread.

I love the taste and smell of fresh rosemary and can only imagine how potent the oil would be.

I have loaned my Silverton's LaBrea Bakery book so I can't check for the recipe title but I meant her bread that uses fresh chopped Rosemary plus some olive oil, I thought the name was Rosemary Olive Oil but it may not be. I just added chopped and drained Kalamata olives to that recipe. That is what gave me the idea to add the olives to Floyd's Italian bread. Didn't really have enough olives left though so added some chopped and drained sun dried tomatoes.

Both breads were much appreciated by my husband who usually reserves such enthusastic remarks for his rye bread. Haven't baked that in a while so next week's challenge for ITJB will be timely. Already have my newly converted starter bubbling away. Couldn't resist naming it Ryly B. Bread:-) though.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

It's on page 80, right before the Olive Bread recipe.

When I saw your post, I thought you meant rosemary oil.

Other than almond extract, it's the one 'flavouring' in my kitchen I'm almost afraid to use, being so incredibly potent.

The recipe calls for 1 TABLESPOON of fresh rosemary.

That's a lot.

(I have a vivid recollection of friends really, really disliking a bread I made with too much rosemary (I think it was Reinhart's Potato Rosemary), so maybe I'm a bit sensitive about that herb).

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

The first time I made the Rosemary-Olive Oil Bread, I shied away from the whole tablespoon of fresh rosemary. Found that the loaves had a faint smell and even more faint taste. I wondered if it was because it came from a new plant. Last time I used the whole amount and didn't find it to be overpowering. Of course that is the opinion of someone who loves both the smell and taste of fresh rosemary.

Some of my family of tasters adamently dislike onion, others sesame seeds, and one even asked what those funny black things were on top of the bread? (My prized Nigella seeds!) So sometimes I make plain bagels, pretzels and pretzel rolls and of course pizza, with them in mind. Other times I delve into the mysteries of Black bread or Panetonne.  Sometimes I bump up against success, and sometimes the wild turkeys get a treat.

 

HeidiH's picture
HeidiH

Like anything else, the strength of rosemary varies a good deal and I think a lot of it has to do with the weather before it's harvested and how old the needles are.  I have a rosemary bush taking over the front walk and the pungency of the rosemary from this one bush varies a good deal.  So, I vary how much of it I use at any one given time.

Oh, and my hubby refers to the Nigella as "those pepper seeds you ruined those rolls with."  Like you, I make some plain rolls just for him.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I can't swallow them without putting them in something like yogurt, but eat about a tablespoon of them and you'll have some of the weirdest dreams ever. I don't know what's in them, but I like it. :D

I like them in bread too.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

too bad.  I put that and more (2 T )  along with 2 T of sundried tomatoes in my standard SD Pizza Dough with a clove (or 2)  of garlic.  With some olives it makes a great  focaccia too when doused in a good amount of Mojo de Ajo with chili flakes and achiaote.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Something I enjoy doing and seeing on the Mozza pizza crust is the way NS uses a large 'crown' on the finished pizza...all the more delicious crust to enjoy.  

I also did not purchase the book for the same reason given by thomaschacon.  NS says the crust recipe she gives is better suited for home ovens......hummmm 'eye roll' : /

Sylvia 

 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

They've given her such a hard time over the years (especially with Breads from the La Brea Bakery) that, I think, she's just ignoring all of them now (and us avid amateurs).

All of her books after Pastries from the La Brea Bakery have targeted home cooks and bakers.

I can't say I blame her.

So her starter takes 50 lbs of flour? So what! It's bullet proof. (And we pay farmers in the US billions to NOT produce flour).

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Just one baker's humble opinion, but I think there's a big difference between professional kitchens and home kitchens.  Where pizza crust is concerned, it's harder to get browning in a 500F oven than in a 750F oven, so adjustments are necessary.  And no matter how much I wish it wasn't true, fermentation progresses differently in large batches than in small ones.  I appreciate it when an author with a pro background really does tailor a recipe to a home kitchen- often scaled down professional recipes aren't tested and tweaked adequately and we suffer the consequences.

That said, I'm not sure that professional kitchens are always better than home kitchens- when I make pizza at home I can customize the crust to the filling- durum and potato crust to pair with a pesto pizza, a touch of rye goes well with caramelized onion/olives, and so forth.  Restaurants would probably not choose to do that because it's more cost-effective to make one type. 

Not sure I'm totally on board with Silverton yet- still smarting over the indecipherable use of the word "match" within a baffling chapter- but it is good to know she's thinking of us when she writes books now :)

Before I forget- nice looking pizza there!

mrosen814's picture
mrosen814

Thank you