The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hamelman's Olive Levain, with quite a few modifications

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jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Hamelman's Olive Levain, with quite a few modifications

So,  with my Rye starter on hand,  just made some Deli Rye bread,  its been quite active.  I decided to try my hand on this Olive Levain.  Why?  My son loves olive,  and I wanted to use the levain,  and there are some olives left in the fridge.The night before,  I build up the liquid levain.  Looking at my starter,  I had a little too much left.  Decided to up the amount from 34g to 100g.  Well,  in 4-5 hours,  my levain was bubbly,  I decided to put it overnight.  In the morning,  I mixed all the final dough ingredients together with the liquid levain. I didn't have whole wheat,  and instead I used rye.  I prefer the taste of rye actually.  And for the olives,  I didn't bother to measure it because I have only a half bottle left,  took them all out and drain it and cut into half.   Putting into my mixer,  set at speed 1,  mixed the dough and let it come together for about 5 minutes.  Then followed by moving to Speed 4,  mixed it up more and check the gluten development.  As this has more liquid than original recipe,  I had to let it mix longer, about 7 minutes.  Then threw in the olives that are cut into half, mixing at speed 1.  I've developed it pretty well to ensure that  the bread will rise nicely.  I used the window pane check.Putting into my container to let it rise,  I did a 1 stretch and fold after 1 hour. The levain was building the bread nicely.   Then I left to buy food for lunch,  by the time I got back 1.5 hours later ,  my cover of the container popped up! I quickly get into action by taking it out,  did a quick fold,  and cut into half and leave it to rest for about 20 mins.Shaping it into oval shape for both,  and left it to rise.  I decided not to retard as recommended by Hamelman as I wanted to bake it in time for lunch and to give it to my little Italian friend's mom.  Heating up the oven at 250 degree celsius,  for 1.5 hours.  The dough rose very nicely.  Steaming the oven with my hot lava stones,  I loaded the bread and sprayed water onto the bread.  First 10 mins was baked at 250 degree celsius,  and  adjusted the temperature to 230 degree celsius.  10 mins left and I turn the bread the other way to let it bake evenly.  The whole baking time is 45 mins.  The bread rose really nicely.  Taking them out,  there is that lovely crackling sound!  Love that it turned out fluffy and light!www.foodforthoughts.jlohcook.com

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

What a nice crust and crumb.  The olive bread must taste terrific too.  Another bread, of so many, that we have never made but my apprentice will soon fix that since she has an olive fetish!

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

This bread tasted great, easy to make.  I wish I had more olives and used wheat flour instead to get a little of the wheaty taste. 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Ha! I was about to say that: If your olive bread has more bread than olives, then you know something's gone awry. :)

Lovely pics, Jenny. Thank you.

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Thomas - you are right,  every bite should have olives in them,  I will certainly remember to buy more olives when I make this bread again.  Thanks!

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

They're hard to find/source in the states, but you can cure some yourself.

Buy some of the oily, pitted, black olives at an olive bar (not those cheap canned black olives used on pizza).

Add some to a jar, then add a layer of kosher salt, then more olives, then more salt, etc. until jar is full.

Shake every once in a while.

You'll need a couple changes of salt the first couple of days, but no more than that.

3-4 weeks later (at room temperature) and they're done.

And they're wonderful!

Especially in olive bread.

Just remember to rinse off the salt. :)

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

I've never tried curing my own olives indeed!  I usually buy off the shelf - italian or spanish,  quite easy to find here. But I must say,  curing your own olives sounds like an excellent idea ineed. Thanks!