The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Loaf container for freezing

Kogepan's picture
Kogepan

Loaf container for freezing

I make about 2 loaves of bread per week and freeze them after slicing.  I've been putting the loaves in freezer zip lock bags and taking out slices as I need them, but wondering if anyone has plastic containers or other ideas they can recommend. My loaves are 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 in. So far I've found this rubbermaid container (http://www.amazon.com/Rubbermaid-Giant-Bread-Keeper-1777190/dp/B0000E1VV4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1336411598&sr=8-1) which is too big (though it could fit both loaves...)  

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

over rigid containers.  They allow you to remove more air and leave less of the bread's surface exposed to air.  That helps reduce drying of the bread while it is in the freezer.

Paul

Kogepan's picture
Kogepan

Yes, I agree with you.  I'm wondering if anyone uses 'retractable' containers that conform to the changing size of the loaves.  

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

I second PMcC's bag preference with two notes: First, we double bag all frozen breads. Second: My father-in-law taught me to use a soda straw to suck the air out of bags of parboiled (or not) garden veg before freezing. Do the same with 2 gallon ziploc bags for freezing boules or half-miches. Note that the bags with the plastic zipper handle don't seal as well as the "unimproved" original design that you need to squeeze and slide your finger along. Best are those with the double (purple) seal. With bagged loaf laying on counter, just, (1) slip the straw into the 'closed' end of the ziploc, (2) slide your finger along to seal up to the straw, (3) apply lips to straw and suck all air out, (4) slide thumb to complete seal while withdrawing straw and still sucking all at same time. Takes very little practice (compared to achieving airy glossy crumb!) to get it right. The tongue dusting of rice/wheat flour or semolina is worth it. Amazing how tightly you can thus vacuum seal a new ziploc bag. A week later, bags are still tight. A year ... maybe not. Of course, a fancy vacuum heat-sealing machine would do even better, and hold for more than year. But not worth it for bread.

All that said: The Container Store has some simple, terrific plastic bulk food storage boxes under the "Lustroware" label made by a Japanese company. They have one that's about 5x7+" (you might have to remove a slice from the middle of your loaves to shorten them to fit) that perfectly accommodates a 5# bag of flour. No need to empty the bag: lay it on its side in the container and slit it open w/Stanley knife on three (or all) edges of the exposed side to open a flap for access. They seal easily and positively with no moving hinged (>breakable) parts like many food storage 'solutions' now have. Great for flour -- less so for loaves compared to bags.

Tom

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

would be to protect the loaf from being squashed by other frozen foods in the freezer.  First zip bag and then stick into the box.  Many stiff plastic containers become very brittle when frozen so be careful when removing and opening lids while frozen.  They can break like thin glass and cut too!  A cardboard box works sometimes better after plastic bagging but one can't see thru it.