The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread storage

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metropical's picture
metropical

Bread storage

curious what others use for bread storage.

The multigrain loaf I make will sometimes be around a week.

In the winter that is not much of a problem, but as the weather warms, the amount of time the loaf can be left "out" is shorter, before penicillin starts to grow.

Normally, the loaf is in an open plastic bag, not one of "breathing" bread bags, just a shopper.  That is fine for perhaps 4 days, but then it goes into the fridge and of course, the consistancy of the loaf changes a lot.

Anyone with other ideas for warm weather storage?

MNBäcker's picture
MNBäcker

I use the Bread Keeper. Works great for me - the Whole Wheat Flaxseed Bread sometimes sits in it for a week, with the vents fully opened, without any problems. The bread stays moist, doesn't dry out and won't mold.

Pleasant Hill Grains sells it here (scroll down on the page).

Stephan

meirp's picture
meirp

I find that putting the bread into the freezer in a well-sealed bag is a better option, if you're not going to finish it within 2 days. Then either thaw it out (in a breathable bread bag, if possible) or, even better, wrapped in tin foil in the oven at a fairly low (warming) temperature - how long depends on the size of the bread (probably at least 15 min.).

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

I cool, cut, and freeze anything that is predominantly white flour (including up to 80% whole wheat), but for rye breads that have little wheat content I prefer to let them age at room temperature for a day or two before cutting and freezing.

When you need it, just take out as many slices (or rolls if you make it up that way) as you want, pop them in the microwave for an appropriate length of time, and enjoy nearly fresh bread.

tn gabe's picture
tn gabe

There is a reason everyone used to own one. I'd imagine the counter, unwrapped is a better idea than in a plastic bag, & the fridge is a no-no for wheat bread.

fancy4baking's picture
fancy4baking

Old fashioned yet very effecient method of keeping ANY kind of bread is to put it in a bag simiral to those used to carry flour or sugar in the old days. I guess they are made of sturdy linen. I have few of those --- well old ones --- i keep my breads in them, and my bread keeps very nice in them for at least a week without any change in color, texture or flavor. The nice about this kind of bags tha they allow breath, but don't allow external air to cause bread stale. In highly arid areas, like here, beside keeping bread in these linen bags, they cover them with kitchen towels to ensure maximum sealing.

Another old fashioned alternative is simply brown paper bags, like those used to carry bread sold in France.

Put your bread in them and tightly close it.

fancy4baking's picture
fancy4baking

I like the Bread Keeper posted by Stephan, they look elegant and i'm assuming that they are good.

But what if the loaf is larger than their size? ;-)

MNBäcker's picture
MNBäcker

True, the size of the loaf dictates what you can use to store your bread. A round loaf would not fit into the Bread Keeper.

The panned loaves and pretty much any of the loaves out of bannetons I make fit nicely - and, yes, it looks nice on the counter:)

Stephan

metropical's picture
metropical

the bread keeper looks good.  And I guess a po bpb would be a good idea as well.

pre-slice and freeze methodology doesn't work for me.

fermento's picture
fermento

As Gabe said above, the fridge compartment is a no-no for wheat bread. For reasons I don't understand bread stales quicker at those temperatures than it does at room temperature, or of course freezing.

I too use a vented bread box, though I often reheat the remaining loaf after two or three days, which brings it back to new.