The Fresh Loaf

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Rye - Wheat free pizza base

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JenBorriero's picture
JenBorriero

Rye - Wheat free pizza base

Hello from South Africa :) I am desparately trying to make a great rye pizza base but on its own, its too heavy.  Does anyone have any experience mixing rye flour with any gluten free flours for a great base thats not like a brick ?? (buckwheat, rice flour ect)  Help please ! Jen

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Rye has gluten and it makes me wonder what your goal is by mixing it with gluten free flours?

Jeff

JenBorriero's picture
JenBorriero

Hi Jeff I can eat gluten but not wheat..strangely enough :)  was mixing the flours as rye so heavy, so experimenting with lightening the taste...however cant get it to rise as low gluten...any ideas how to get it to rise ?

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Now I understand.  Quite possibly you may have an actual wheat allergy that is unrelated to the entire gluten issue.

On to your crust.........Rye is not going to work, I should say that I know of no way to make rye work and I spend a lot of time with rye breads. 

Three or four possibilities come to mind.  Bob's Red Mill makes a gluten free pizza crust mix.  In the name of simplicity, that is what I would do.  It is expensive but so is everything else in the gluten/wheat free world.  Here are the ingredients from that product: 

Ingredients: whole grain brown rice flour, potato starch, whole grain millet flour, whole grain sorghum flour, tapioca flour, potato flour, evaporated cane juice, xanthan gum, active dry yeast, sea salt (magnesium carbonate as flowing agent), guar gum

Thia is a fairly typical ingredients list from a gluten free product and will give you an idea of how you might proceed on your own.  Proceeding on your own from a list like this is my second idea.  Thirdly, you could search the internet as there are numerous gluten free pizza crust recipes to be found from a wide variety of sources.  My last idea is to wait for the new book that Peter Reinhart is working on that is all about gluten free recipes.  I do not know with certainty, but I would guess that it will include a pizza recipe.  Based on his past efforts in the book world, I look for this to be a good source of gluten free information.  That book is due sometime in the next few months.  I hope that this helps and let me know if you need more information.

Jeff

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

granted I haven't tried it yet.  I do predict it won't hold up to high temps though.   still interested?

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Mini,

Your middle name should be "rye", who knows maybe it is.  I would love to hear your rye crust idea.

Jeff

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

if you folded two stiffly beaten egg whites (with the appropriate % of salt for the flour amount in the starter) 

with 200g of half risen 100% hydration rye sourdough starter ...folding in some rye altus crumbs

spread it out and baked it?

Would it come out like a rye crisp?  

One major difference between wheat and rye is that upon upon reheating rye, it goes limp and doesn't really crisp, that would make a strictly knife & fork kind of pizza.  How often have you noticed that a toasted rye sandwich was soft?  I once thought that the bread had soaked up so much juice from the pastrami, sauerkraut etc. but the bread itself has gone soft or re-gelatainized.   That is something to consider when serving a rye pizza.  

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Here is a Pizza crust I have made that is delicious and has no Wheat.

2 Cups Almond Flour (227g)
1/2 Cup Sesame seed flour (57g)
1/4 Cup warm Water
2-1/4 teaspoons Yeast (IDY)
1 teaspoon Stevia
1/2 teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2 teaspoon Salt

Combine dry ingredients well. Whisk egg and water together and add to dry ingredients.
Stir the "batter" to combine well.
Spread on an oiled pan with oiled fingers.
Poke fork holes in dough to prevent bubbles.
Bake for 20 minutes at 300F rotating if needed or until crust JUST starts to darken slightly. Remove from oven.

Top with toppings and bake at 325F until done.

You could swap the Stevia with sugar but it is healthier this way. I like this with a well spiced sauce and Romano Cheese and Pepperoni.

Eric

JenBorriero's picture
JenBorriero

wow thank you all...you have been so helpful & kind !  I must say the pizza bases with flour like buckwheat, millet ect has been a lot more successful than my rye.  I'm so devastated as I LOVE Rye...and have so many requests for it here!

Mimi you are clearly a baking guru as I have never used a starter in my life...you are speaking to a rye loving amatuer ?  !! I would love to try your idea if you explain to me ?

 

ps love the thought of the Almond flour Eric..unfortunately very expensive in SA and I need to make this product in bulk :( going to make it for myself tho !

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

they make life with rye worth living!  Here is a wiki link.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rye_bread

Some of your rising problems might be related to using commercial yeast and not having enough acid in the dough.  I have a restricted kitchen at the moment but I can fry up a rye pancake and pop it into the microwave to raise it a few more milimeters and firm up the disk.  Firm enough to use for a base.

The archives here are also packed full of information.  Rye starters are one of the easiest to get started and maintain.  Go for it!

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/233/wild-yeast-sourdough-starter

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Jen,

Another idea would be to take an existing wheat free recipe and substitute rye for one of the lesser flours in the recipe.  You could experiment from there and come up with a wheat free pizza dough with rye flavor.  By all means follow Mini's advice and give birth to a rye starter.  It will change you life for the better.

Mini:  I am looking into the egg white idea.  Of course the easiest way to "look into" it would be to try it.  Maybe in a few days.

Jeff

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

or an oven, although a large frying pan low/med heat might work too.  

The idea is to get the rye sour (starting with a half mature sourdough -- hoping for a little gas and stretch left in it) with enough hydration so that it can be nicely folded into the stiff egg whites.  I debated using the yolks.  (this is all inside my brain)  yolks can easily be added after the whites have been beating dropping one by one.  I'm worried the yolks may leave the dough too soft.  I would try both.  

I've been wanting to make "Oopsie" bread with only separated eggs and a tiny pinch of cream of tartar for the whites /plus blending 29g cream cheese and salt to each large egg yolk.  Same principal folding in the stiff egg white to make the bread matrix.  This is extreme low carb "bread wrap" or "bun" without flour (about two servings per egg.)  Working a soft foamy sourdough starter into this concept might be another way to go.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

NO OVEN !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mini,

On which planet are you being held captive.  We'll send Kirk and Spock to rescue you.

Jeff

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

By the time they get here, even at warp speed, I'll be another jean size smaller!   Fun times with the micro and two fry pans.   Fear if I stay too long, bonding with the micro is inevitable.  "Resistance is futile."  

I got some of the bare essentials.  One bowl, wooden spoon, wooden flipper, tongs, a few plates and a coffee mug.  No scales, no measuring spoons or cups but do have a travel iron and a tiny hot water cooker and a small refrigerator and two electric burners.   ...and maid service!  :)    (I really should me making a mess here, back home I have to clean up after myself!)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

...

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Jen,

A good technique to consider for pizza without wheat is to make a batter and cook off as pancakes.

Top the pancakes as for pizzas, and then bake quickly on the sole of the oven, or a stone.

Best wishes

Andy