The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Recently acquired all-grain mill

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kozulich's picture
kozulich

Recently acquired all-grain mill

I recently acquired an All-Grain A33X home grain mill on ebay.  I think I got it for a very good price ($175 plus shipping).  It was missing the bucket which catches the flour, but I called All-Grain and, contrary to the experience many people have reported, the phone was immediately answered and I was able to arrange for a replacement bucket to be manufactured and sent to me for $45.  The bucket is basically a 5 gallon bucket with a precisely located input port on the side and a lid made of fine filter foam.  The input port is at an angle to direct the air flow around the inner circumference of the bucket to allow the flour to fall out of the vortex.  I suppose it would hold about 3 gallons of processed flour before it would need to be emptied.  In a pinch, I think a fine fabric flour sack could be pressed into service in place of the bucket, but it would be bound to release more flour into the air, so that would definitely make it an outdoor operation.  The bucket arrived yesterday, so today I set the mill up and did some trial grinding using hard red wheat I bought at WalMart.  

On the fine setting, the mill stones turned out a whole grain flour that was extremely fine.  No shards of bran at all.  This, I think, will make a wonderful, light, finely textured whole grain bread.  On the coarse setting, it produced something akin to cracked wheat, but with a small percentage of flour.  This would probably have to be sifted to seperate the flour from the cracked wheat.  On the medium setting, it produced a meal similar to a farina, such as would be used for cream of wheat.  In fact, that is just what we did.  Fresh whole grain cream of wheat - it was delicious and nutritious, not to mention filling.

All things considered, it was pretty easy to do, even though I have no owners manual or directions of any kind, I was able to figure out how to assemble it and make it work.  The machine was moderately loud, but not obnoxious.  Somewhat less annoying than a vacuum cleaner.  It did release small amounts of flour dust into the air, so if done regularly this might be better outside or in the garage.  Clean up was relatively easy.  I just disassembled the machine and blew it all out with my air compressor.

Overall, I'm very pleased, and would heartily recommend the mill to anybody who's looking into home milling.

plevee's picture
plevee

I've had the same model for over 10 years - also from eBay. It isn't as pretty as some of the wood cabinet mills but the feature I appreciate most is that it grinds very cool - the resulting flour is barely above room temperature.

Patsy

kozulich's picture
kozulich

I noticed that too.  No heat to speak of.  Did yours come with any sort of manual or directions?

plevee's picture
plevee

The only thing I've learned is not to change the grind setting when it's running. The mill is self cleaning - just let it run for a few seconds empty, then wipe the spout.

Patsy

kozulich's picture
kozulich

I noticed that the last few kernals tend to bounce around for quite a while before they are finally expelled.