The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Italian Corner - Cellos with Squash Lasagna and David Snyder's Pulgliese Capriosso

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Italian Corner - Cellos with Squash Lasagna and David Snyder's Pulgliese Capriosso

The first time I made limoncello I used the skins of 7 lemons per liter of grain alcohol and let the the grain sit on the skins for 20 days to extract the oil from skins and then let it age another 20 days to mello after straining filtering and cutting with sugar syrup 5o-50.  I used 454 g of sugar per liter of water and liter of lemon oil alcohol extraction.  It was a real Amalfi Coast recipe from Villa di Marie but I didn't like it that much even though it tasted just like the too many samples I had in Italy and couldn't get enough of. 

 

Mandarin left, lemon middle and orange right.  The orange was first to bottle.  When you mix the sugar syrup with the filtered alchohol the 50-50 mix goes cloudy but will clear later as the orange has already done. 

Now, many years later after much trial and error (like baking), I triple the skins to 21 lemons (to get a much stronger lemon flavor), cut the grain alcohol 50 -50 with vodka (to cut the heat of the grain) and let the alcohol sit on the skins for 60 to 90 days before straining filtering and and blending with sugar syrup that now is 340 g of sugar per liter of water (the original was too sweet) and it mellows for another 60-90 days.  I use the same recipe for minneolas, oranges and this year for the first time mandarins .  Folks tell me it is the best cellos they have ever had and I agree.

Finally got all of the varieties in the final bottles this past week.

It goes great with some Grilled Italian squash lasagna and some of David Snyder's Pulgliese Capriosso.

Comments

varda's picture
varda

I'm starting to feel a little tipsy.   Or maybe a lot.   Beautiful Pugliese.   Really lovely colored crust.   -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I froze from the first one we baked of David's gem.  It was saved for retasting last on purpose because it was so good.   Was absoutely the best garlic bread we ever had with this nice salad too.  David's Italian boule is a treat to eat any way you chose to do so.

I'm stuffed but smiling.  Not hot enough outside for drinking cellos and they need another 50 days to mello anyway :-) I have been sneaking some of the orange into my margaritas lately to replace the triple sec though :-)

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

With the investment you've made in your cellos, they must be wonderful.

Maybe you should have put the lasagna and pugliese before the cellos, though. I'm feeling sorry for Varda, taking in 3 bottles of strong spirits on an empty stomache. ;-)

David

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Bordinsky, I'm guessing she could handle some woosie cellos no problem!   Cellos are just another food fun thing to do.  Can't seem to buy at that quality level.  Still like your Pulgliese Capriosso the best of your breads that I have tried but haven't done your latest version of SFSD - just waiting for you to call it done is all :-)

Buzzer just went off for end of final proof on my first shot at Baggies!  Doing 20% Rye & WW SD and Teketeke's YW ones that we made at 17% Rye and WW.  Can only make then 16" long due to round stone that is that size.  With my slashing handicap this should be interesting :-)

Thanks for sharing all of your recipes.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

The cello looks so delicious for hot summer evening...I especially love the bottles too!  The lasagna, salad look delicious and what a lovely pugliese.  Oh yes, be sure and put the latter away before you open the cellos : )

Sylvia

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Nice bottles are for weak moments .....when you forget all the work and waiting (the real WW's)  ......and give it away to a friend and relative when they say 'hey, this is so good, sure wish I had some of this'.

The Italians drink their cellos ice cold, out of the freeezer and strait up. near the ocean.   But they are hard core cello drinkers !  I prefer mine in orange crush, lemon lime soda and margaritas by the pool. Their cello sides of: salads, foods and bread are the cats meow.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

It's only 8 am but after looking at your amazing cooking and baking and drink making I'm ready to party!  Wish I could have joined you for dinner last night!  Beautiful looking photography as well .

Regards

Ian

Syd's picture
Syd

That's a great looking pugliese.  The lasagna is not too shabby either!  And that limoncello looks very refreshing. All very summer-ish.  

Best,

Syd

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

for your kind comments Syd.  Yes we are getting nready for the 110 F summers here in AZ coming soon.  Can't have enough cellos for margaritas and adding into orange and lemon lime sodas by the pool.  Soon, all of the flying insects will be gone.  They will come out of their shade, take off and you will see a little puff of smoke when they vaporize in the sunlight.  Get cello entertainment :-)

Love making David Snyder's Pulgliesi Capriosso.  We add some more rye and WW to it per my taste but thankfully no slashing required!! A fine bread for fine food and hooch.  That is what life should be all about :-)

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Ah. Limoncello! A nice way to finish any meal. Where in Italy have you been?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Rome, Bologna, Florence, Venice, Naples, Capri, Sicily, Almalfi Coast.  When I lived in Saudi Arabia, I would go to Italy or France once a quarter for some R&R.  Before that I would travel overseas and stop in Rome, Paris, Frankfurt or London on the way and back.  It was a great job.

I've never finished a meal with limoncello but have sure started a few with it by the pool on a hot day and we have plenty of this time of year.  I'm not a fan of it straight but do like like it mixed withe diet; lemon lime soda, squirt, cranberry squirt and lemonade.  Like arancello with orange crush and in margaritas too.  Very refreshing,

Now that I have the flour for panettone it will soon be a quest following your lead.