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How do I score a bâtard to achieve this effect?

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

How do I score a bâtard to achieve this effect?

How do I score a bâtard to achieve this effect?

At first, it looks like a simple slash down the center, but is it? Or is there more to it?

Photo Credit. Bertinet, Richard. "Pâte au seigle (Pâte d'olives)." Pains gourmands: 50 recettes simples et créatives. Paris: Larousse, 2006. 123. Print.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm guessing that the effect in the photo was achieved partly by slashing but also by how the loaf was shaped. It looks as if there are "ears" on both margins of the grigne (bloom). Might that be from rolling up the dough loosely and slashing with the blade relatively vertical to the dough surface? It looks as if the ears are formed by a whole layer of dough lifting up, rather than just a flap created by an acute-angled slash.

I also wonder, since this is a pain de seigle, whether Bertinet scored the loaf before proofing rather than right before loading. Do the instructions in the book give any hints?

David

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

The book is in French. I can read French well enough, but it doesn't say anything about the scoring.

I only read the part for that bread in particular, though. Maybe there are directions in another section.

He scores loaves before proofing? That's novel. Isn't it. I don't think I've ever heard of anyone doing that. Is that unique to Bertinet?

Whatever it is, it has to be more than just a vertical slash. I've slashed many a batard and never achieved something that looks as neat.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I don't know that Bertinet scores this bread before proofing. I was speculating. French rye breads are sometimes scored in this manner. I believe the reason is that they have so little oven spring, you get more bloom if you allow it to develop during proofing.

David

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I'll have to try scoring my ryes that way. Even when I make 60% ryes (with hi-gluten as the other 40%), I don't get a respectable bloom.

It's especially aggravating because there's a Russian shop (think: ryes/cured sausages/vodka/sour cream/tobacco) next door to me that sells 100% ryes that bloom twice as high.

I haven't met the baker yet, but I'd wager she's a 90-year old baboushka with 80 years of experience under her belt–and she has no recipes.

MANNA's picture
MANNA

It looks like there is butter and herbs and rolled up in it like cinn-raisin bread. Then you do one slash down the middle cutting through the outer most roll. So, roll out dough. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with herbs de province. Roll-up and let rise. Slash top and bake. Let us know how things work out and post a pic of your loaf.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

So it is a roll. Neat!

That's also what David thought.

Did I just miss it in the directions?

Thanks.

(I'll make it soon and post photos.)

Costas's picture
Costas

Hi,ry to triple slash it just before you bake it.

First  slash it is the classic one,from side to side,

second it will be diagonally down left and the third diagonally down right,

but you must slash it inside the gap you will produce from your initial one.

 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I can't see it because it's too small. Thanks.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

the separating layer which makes sense  if the vertical score went deep enough to almost reach it.  I think it pulled open in the bake predicting it would tear further until it reached the olive layer.  I think it was scored just before going into the oven.

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

I think David and Mini  have both parts of this.  Forming the bread by rolling it and slashing almost through the top layer.  I also think there may be a temperature of dough factor here or proofing degree.  The center of that loaf does not look like it had the same spring factor as the outside of the loaf.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

...I'm thinking it's at the shaping point.

Roll out a rectangle of bulk fermented dough. Sprinkle olives (or maybe brush with olive oil first and then sprinkle with olives), then score it at the far right edge, roll from left to right, respecting the score, tuck the ends, then proof score side up.

You're probably right, though, I'm just not sure if the layer of olives would keep the rolls from sticking, especially after proofing.

 

jcking's picture
jcking

I have the English version of the book. The dough, pre proof, is flattened into a rectangle. Then olive paste is spread across the dough. It is then rolled, seam sealed and left to proof. One single straight slash prior to oven loading. The slash would be deep enough to reveal the olive spread.

Olive paste; 7 oz olives, 2 tsp herbes de Provence, 2 Tbl EVOO. Blitz in food processor till a paste forms.

Jim

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I didn't think there was an English version.

Could you tell me what the ISBN number is, please, Jim? Thanks.

-

Looks like David, Mini, and MANNA got it right on the scoring.

(And I've proven to myself, yet again, that my French comprehension is nowhere near where it should be.) ;D

jcking's picture
jcking

ISBN: 978 1 904920 20 5

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Большое спасибо!

Eskerrik asko!

Þakka þér kærlega!

Muchas gracias!

Linky: http://www.amazon.com/Dough-Simple-Contemporary-Richard-Bertinet/dp/1904920209/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1334421157&sr=8-1


Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:)

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

http://techno.boulangerie.free.fr/09-ReussirLeCAP/03-lesFormesEnVideo.html

When you click on them, two hands appear and those hands are magical.

Le fendu! Mon préféré!

 

Costas's picture
Costas

iam trying to update image but i cant .... i will try to figure it how to do it

Yuki-Johan's picture
Yuki-Johan

I am an ameteur but the bread's dough was rolled with herbs or butter seam side up and left to proof. Before baking a single slash deep along the seam to cut a layer off. Just try it it will work. 

 I have done this before accidentally when baking a stuffed bread. I had ears like the picture.

If you look closely at the picture you can make out that the seam side is up and not down.