The Fresh Loaf

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French Style Baguettes with Quinoa Flour

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isand66's picture
isand66

French Style Baguettes with Quinoa Flour

I was in the mood for something simple and relatively uncomplicated to bake so I decided to make some baguettes based on the Peter Reinhart method from ABED which uses a long overnight ferment of the bulk dough.  Of course I couldn't leave well enough alone and had to add something different to make it more interesting.  I just picked up some quinoa flour from the supermarket which imparts a nice nutty flavor to the dough.  I also added some low protein Italian style 00 flour from KAF along with some organic whole wheat and bread flour.

The end result was a nice crispy, light and nutty flavored baguette.  I still need some practice with my shaping and figuring out how long to make them so they fit on my oven stone.  I could have handled the dough a little lighter to preserve some bigger holes, but overall the crumb was not bad and the crust was nice and crisp.

Ingredients

300 grams KAF Bread Flour (BakersPercentage, 44%)

200 grams Italian Style Flour 00, KAF (BakersPercentage, 29%)

100 grams Organic Whole Wheat Flour, KAF (BakersPercentage, 15%)

80 grams Quinoa Flour, Bob's Red Mill (BakersPercentage, 12%)

454 grams water, 70 degrees Fahrenheit (BakersPercentage, 67%)

14 grams Sea Salt  (BakersPercentage, 2%)

7 grams Instant Yeast (BakersPercentage, .01%)

Directions

Using your stand mixer or by hand, mix the water with the flours for 2 minutes on low.

Let the dough autolyse for 30 minutes.

Add the salt and mix for 2 minutes more on medium speed, adding more flour if necessary to produce a slightly sticky ball of dough.

Remove dough to your lightly floured work surface and need for 1 minute and form into a ball.

Leave uncovered for 10 minutes.

Do a stretch and fold and form into a ball again and cover with a clean moist cloth or oiled plastic wrap.

After another 10 minutes do another stretch and fold and put into a lightly oiled bowl that has enough room so the dough can double overnight.

Put in your refrigerator immediately for at least 12 hours or up to 3 days.

When ready to bake the bread, shape the dough as desired being careful not to handle the dough too roughly so you don't de-gas it.

Place it in your bowl, banneton or shape into baguettes.

Let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours covered with oiled plastic wrap or a wet cloth.

Pre-heat oven with baking stone (I use one on bottom and one on top shelf of my oven), to 500 degrees F.

Slash loaves as desired and place empty pan in bottom shelf of oven.

Pour 1 cup of very hot water into pan and place loaves into oven.

Lower oven to 450 Degrees and bake for 25 - 35 minutes until bread is golden brown and internal temperature reaches 200 degrees.

Shut the oven off and crack the door with the bread still present.  Let it sit for 10 minutes to continue to dry out and develope the perfect crust.

Let cool on cooling rack and enjoy!

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Looks nice, isand66! I like the idea of adding quinoa flour. You are right, more practice on dough handling and you should be there, afterall, it contains wholegrains.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Mebake...the quinoa flour really added a nice nuttiness to the bread.  This bread made great toast this morning along with some cheese.  I don't make Baguettes very often but 2 of the 4 came out good shape wise and the other 2 were a little flat.  Didn't help that I made them too long to fit on my oven stone and peel.

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Those look great- love your mix of flours, must try the quinoa in something soon, thanks for the idea!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Flour Child.  I loves the flavor profile of this mix so I highly recommend it.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you Ian.  I can't fiigure out how to get a classic 24" baggie on my 16" stone - with or without a spreadsheet :-)

I like the 27% whole grains including the Quinoa and the nuttiness it brings to the flavor.  The WW gives the crumb a nice brown speckled color too.  This has to taste more hearty and interesting than Plain Old French Bread - not that there is anything wrong with POFB - at least nothing that some Armadillo Nectar can't fix in a pinch :-)

Nice bread Ian.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA....for the first bread I've made in months with yeast I was pretty happy with the results.  I find it hard to use "plain" flour only anymore and love the depth and range of flavors I can play with by adding so many different flours.  Tonight my whole grain soaker bread shall be born anew.  It smells good enough to eat without baking.  I think you would like this one for sure....not as good as your Challah but hopefully a worthy bread none-the-less.

Regards.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bought some quinoa berries about a month ago to put in some bread.  I wonder what happened to them?  Once I learn to slash I will take this one on.  I watched the Vietnamese Baggie YouTube today so I know how shape them correctly.  The baggies in old Saigon were to die for by the way (if you didn't get killed trying to eat them) - as good or better as the ones in Mexico City.  I haven't made a poolish in years. The ones is France are still the best - of the 3.

My spell checker says to replace poolish with foolish.  Maybe it actually knows something worth knowing this time.....but it also says to replace quinoa with Guinea.

Love soakers, sprouts and seeds (SS&S) now that I use them in just about every bread now :-)  I will await the posting of your latest bread creation.

isand66's picture
isand66

Bread is just about ready to come out of the oven...will post tomorrow.

What is the Vietnamese Baggie?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

went they took their bread with them.  The French baggie in Vietnam is called Banh Mi.  Here is the thread

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19301/banh-mi

here is the YouTube video form shaping them

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Idx4QJwcPHA

When Maximillian (of France - I think sent there by Bonaparte ) was Emperor of Mexico, he brought French bread there too. They are called Bolillos a longish torpedo shaped roll used for gorditos.  This thread talks about them:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/10917/search-jean-luc-poujauran-recipes

Had some decent French bread in Algeria too.  Can't remember what it was called there though.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Mine is 20" x 15". If I put the loaf diagonally, I can make a 25" baggie.

A 16" x 16" would get you close with a 22.6" inch one.

:)

Now I want a bahn me. With extra everything. Twice that. Hell, just give me two sandwiches. And a cafe sua da.

isand66's picture
isand66

I will have to try putting it diagonally.  You can only fit 1 or 2 probably I would think like that, right?

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I could blame Pythagoras, but that would be unfair.

For the longest time, I'd risk burning myself trying to position them that way in the hot oven. Bad idea! Then a little common sense appeared: position the loaves diagonally on parchment.

(Not my image, but it conveys the idea.)

(Why do people put thick, raw tomato slices in the oven and think they'll turn out crispy, instead of a soggy mess?)

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for the idea....I shall certainly give this a try, sans the tomatoes!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

My stone is round and 16" no matter what direction :-(  When we replace the counter tops in the baths this year I will get an inch thick piece of granite to fit the oven though. I tried when we redid the kitchen but no luck with left over granite then.

The thin crusty crust secret of the Vietnamese baggie came out on the bahn mi thread.  Sptitz the top of the baggie and use your finger to make a thin paste on the skin.  What you can learn on TFL is amazing.

isand66's picture
isand66

Does granite work well as a heat conductor?  I wouldn't of thought that would be an ideal baking stone, but that's far from my area of expertise.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Now that I know it has a nutty flavour and that I can use it to make baguettes (assuming I figure out how to mill it into flour), I think I'll buy a bag.

They certainly look tasty, isand66.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Thomas.  I have not graduated to milling my own flour yet...but I don't see why you couldn't give it a go.

Let me know how it turns out.