The Fresh Loaf

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Dough in fridge until Tuesday evening?

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leavenguy's picture
leavenguy

Dough in fridge until Tuesday evening?

Hi - I've got to the final overnight proving in the fridge. However, I've been called away and won't be back until Tuesday evening. Will the dough keep until then?

Many thanks...

jcking's picture
jcking

Sourdough maybe; yeasted maybe not. It may flatten in the oven yet eatable.

Jim

leavenguy's picture
leavenguy

It's sourdough but maybe better to bake it just before I go and hope that it keeps till next week. 

jcking's picture
jcking

Or bake it and take it with you.

leavenguy's picture
leavenguy

Or freeze it??

jcking's picture
jcking

Take and eat where ever you are going.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

If you made it with commercial yeast, you'll likely end up with what I call "rubber dough". It'll have no color and will be very dense and chewy. You probably won't like it.

If you made it with sourdough, it might last, but drop the temp. in your fridge to 35-37 F.

 

FoodFascist's picture
FoodFascist

I wouldn't risk it TBH, sourdough or yeast. My yeast dough has often managed to spill over the top of the bowl when retarded overnight. Whereas sourdough will probably end up so sour that even if it bakes ok you may not like the taste much. I think your best bet would be either to freeze the dough, or to bake and freeze the loaves. But good luck whatever you choose to do.

aytab's picture
aytab

Give it to the neighbors and tell them when to bake it, they will thank you for it!!

 

rabbouchi's picture
rabbouchi

I prepare all of my dough for my Saturday farmers market on Tuesday. This includes milk breads, wheat breads, panettone, ciabatte, you name it. I use instant yeast, as well as biga, pâté fermentè, sponges. I do not make sour dough do I can't vouch for cold retardation with that starter, but I have found that all of my bread doughs benefit from a cold, slow rise under refrigeration. The depth of flavor is unbelievable! Just use a large enough container to hold your dough so it doesn't spill over and dry out. When I make all of my dough on Tuesday, I let each one rise at room temp in a large container while I prepare the next dough. Then I take each risen dough and form it and let the formed dough sit at room temp as I work with the next dough. Once I am finished, I have 2 completely full rolling racks that go into the walk-in cooler for the next 3 days, until I'm ready to bake Friday night. I proof the breads on Friday night, but I'm fortunate to have proofing cabinets to speed that process up a bit.  Just take your dough out of the fridge and let it warm up and rise before baking. 

I usually take 15-20 different types of breads, 10-18 loaves of each, to the market on Saturday mornings. The only breads that I don't pre-form are ancienne and brioche. I let those rise in bulk until Friday. Give it a go, you'll be glad you did. Good luck!

Salilah's picture
Salilah

So you leave the shaped loaves in the cooler for 3 days?  Fascinating!  What temperature is your walk-in cooler set at?  I wasn't sure you could do that with a fridge, which is at 4C!
thanks
Salilah

FoodFascist's picture
FoodFascist

I was just thinking that, Sali, and some fridges are warmer than others. Mine can be set to different degrees of "coolness" but it doesn't tell you the exact temperature range. Someone mentioned on another thread that a professional walk-in cooler would be just above freezing so certainly cooler than your average household fridge.

Salilah's picture
Salilah

My "fridge down the garden" (in the other building) has an indicator of temperature which says 4C - I don't use it for much except when we have people staying, so I could try taking it lower - on the other hand, 4C is only 4 above freezing anyway! However I haven't actually checked it with a thermometer - might try that, I have a spare garden one that would go down below freezing / up to whatever...

Fingers crossed we get a reply re the cool retarder temperature :-)

rabbouchi's picture
rabbouchi

Hi, sorry for the late(ish) response; it's Tuesday so I was in the kitchen preparing all of my dough for my Saturday market. I wasn't thinking about the differences between a commercial walk-in cooler and a home refrigerator when I posted my comment, so I believe FF has a valid point.  The walk-in fluctuates between 33-34 F (1 C) and 40 F (~4 C), depending on the number of people in and out of the cooler.  I don't know how quickly the temperature recovers compared to the home refrigerator, either, so that may be another factor to consider.  However, I have successfully formed and held dough in the home fridge for a number of days, too.  

Today I prepared panmarino, honey whole wheat loaves, oat loaves, pain au lait rolls (two different types), Provencal herb bread (boule), rice, onion and sage bread (loaves and couronne), sweet potato rolls, pain a l'ancienne, panettone, flax and sunflower seed bread (batard), semolina bread (batard, in the style of Altamura) and brioches.  All but the ancienne and brioches are formed and ready to bake on Friday.

I still say give it a go and see how it works for you.  I wouldn't bake my bread any other way now!  Cheers, Rosemarie

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Hi Rosemarie - thanks for the reply!  I was just fascinated by this - I use an overnight retarded rise in the fridge (sometimes shaped, sometimes just hte dough) but I've not gone longer than that!  It sounds like the walk-in is colder but not by a lot - and as my fridge is "spare", I could try dialing it down to e.g. 2C. 

Your method sounds fascinating - and your range of breads superb!  How many loaves do you sell each week?  Do you follow this schedule because you have Tuesday free and not Wed or Thu, or is the 3 day delay deliberate?  What sort of oven do you have for baking that many loaves?  The whole set-up sounds fantastic - much admiration!

thanks lots
Sali

rabbouchi's picture
rabbouchi

I rent time/space in a commercial kitchen and I am at 2 farmers markets each week. For expediency, I make all of my dough and shape it for both markets on Tuesday. I always made my dough in advance, but when I added a Wednesday market, I started to make all of the dough on Tuesday. Now I feel I would miss the depth of flavor that the long, slow cold retardation provides if I did it any other way. 

I'm actually an accountant and left the profession just over a year ago to bake full-time. I love it, so the only time making all of the dough seems like work is when my knees ache!  I usually take up to 20 different breads, which includes several types of scones, to my Saturday market. My mid-week market is much smaller and serves more of a lunch crowd. Needless to say,Tuesday and Friday are the days I don't answer the phone much :).   Thanks for your nice note - Rosemarie 

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Thanks Rosemarie for this info - I do like hearing about how people get to being retail bakers - renting the kitchen really makes sense!

Congratulations on making the career move, that is great, so pleased it is working out.  Good luck for the future!

(and I will try the long ferment just to see how it works out...)

Sali