The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Delayed slashing

inabech's picture
inabech

Delayed slashing

I recently attended a bread making demonstration given by an Italian baker. 

He placed the  unslashed bread in a covered Dutch oven heated to 500°F. After five minutes he removed the bread from the Dutch oven and quickly slashed the bread. He then returned that covered Dutch oven to the oven and reduce the temperature to 425 to 450°F and completed the baking process

Upon completion, the bread loaf looked beautiful and tasted great. Texture was perfect. The Baker claimed that delaying the slashing process results in a much more even looking loaf.

I would appreciate comments and discussion on this technique. 

 

fminparis's picture
fminparis

What's the difference what others say?  Try it.  If it works for you, do it.  If not, don't do it. It's just one loaf.

jcking's picture
jcking

Any idea of the dough hydration? I'm thinking it may help a hydration of 70 to 75%.

Jim

inabech's picture
inabech

I calculate the hydration at 72 percent. 

Mukoseev's picture
Mukoseev

I have been doing exactly that for several years and it works great.  I take the bread out of the oven after 10 minutes, uncover it, slash it and put it back in the oven uncovered for 35 minutes at 435 degrees.

afrika's picture
afrika

WHAT HYDRATION ARE THE PICTURED LOAVES THANK YOU

tgrayson's picture
tgrayson

Hmmm, the cuts don't seem to open up that well.

Mukoseev's picture
Mukoseev

Really?

 

jcking's picture
jcking

The cuts look great, with no tearing. Perhaps a pre-bake picture would show the effect of oven spring. Good job, nice crust color.

Jim

Mukoseev's picture
Mukoseev

80% hydration

afrika's picture
afrika

 BEAUTIFUL 

 

fancy4baking's picture
fancy4baking

Does this technique work for loaves baked uncovered on baking stone or is it just limited to loaves baked in dutch ovens or something alike?

Thanks,

Izzat

inabech's picture
inabech

I asked the baker and he said that the delayed slashing works whether in a closed vessel or on a stone. His theory is that the loaf has a chance to form a thin skin making it easier to cut a slash.