The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Poolish bubbly but didn't double in size

Yevgenia's picture
Yevgenia

Poolish bubbly but didn't double in size

Hello everybody! I'm trying to make a focaccia for the first time. My poolish (after 12 hours at 70 F) has got a lot of bubbles, smells nice, but it didn't double in size, rose only a little. What should I do? Wait for a few hours or throw it away? 

 

lumos's picture
lumos

Poolish, which is usually 100% hydration or sometimes higher, does not double in size.  It does increase in size and the surface rises a bit, but not that much. If the surface is really bubbly all over (like the photo below)  and  smells nice, you can use it. 

Yevgenia's picture
Yevgenia

lumos, thanks a million! Mine looks like this



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lumos's picture
lumos

Hi, Yevgenia,

I'd say leave it for a bit longer.  I don't think it's reached the full ripeness yet.    Difficult say how long though because it'd depends on the temperature and how much yeast you put in.  Just keep on watching the surface and its level. 

Personally I prefer to use it when it reached the full ripeness (when the surface level at its highest) but other people prefer to use it when it just passed that level (you'll know because the middle of the surface starts sinking a bit).  So even if you leave it a little too long and it passed its full ripeness, it won't do any harm. ;)

 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Unless you have it in a graduated container, or a "very cylindrical" container that you can rule off (as opposed to some sort of non-graduated bowl), it is very hard to tell. The volume changes in a bowl shaped container are not so obvious.

Yevgenia's picture
Yevgenia

lumos, mrfrost, thank you for your help, it's much appreciated!

So here is my first focaccia. Well….. It’s edible, but still nothing to write home about. I blame it on my mad skillz as well as the yeast. Besides, I baked it longer than I should have. The bottom crust is too thick and hard. On the plus side, the crumb is yummy. I’ll try to make it better next time.  



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lumos's picture
lumos

The crumb looks fine.  :)   The lack of colour outside could be due to the oven not pre-heated enough.  At what temperature did you bake it?   How long did you pre-heat the oven?  Also you need to sprinkle lot of olive oil on the surface just before you load the dough into the oven. 

Yevgenia's picture
Yevgenia

I don’t know the temperature. I baked focaccia in a gas oven, on a baking tray. (it’s impossible to buy a baking stone here). I put a bowl of water underneath the baking tray, preheated the oven for about 30 minutes, baked foccacia for 3 minutes, reduced the heat and baked for 30 minutes.

 I’ll try to use silicone baking form next time. And I’ll need to buy an oven thermometer. 

I sprinkled some olive oil on the surface (but obviously not enough), let the dough sit for 40 minutes, then loaded it into the oven . 

gerhard's picture
gerhard

Foccacia we bake in a Garland gas oven, I turn the temp as high as it will go with the stone in, wait half an hour and then put the Foccacia pan in and turn the temp to 475 F, after 10 minutes give the pan a turn, 10 more minutes and remove from oven and take foccacia out of pan to be put on a cooling rack.  The lack of colour is either your oven wasn't hot enough or all the available sugars had been used up by the yeasts.

Gerhard