The Fresh Loaf

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A question about baking Challah in a baking tray

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ramat123's picture
ramat123

A question about baking Challah in a baking tray

Hi there,

I'm baking Challahs for years and this morning tried o bake it a baking tray (is that how you call a simple dish you bake an english cake in?).

Now, after proofing for 90 minutes in the tray I put it for 30 minutes in the oven and it comes out without firm crust which means it can't be taken out of the tray.

What should I do to bake a Challah in a baking tray?

Thanks a lot,

David

Elagins's picture
Elagins

Aluminum is the best normally available heat conducting metal, after copper. Use a well-greased aluminim loaf pan to bake your challah and make sure it reaches an internal temperature of 200F/95C. That should solve your problem.

Shabbat Shalom,

Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

ramat123's picture
ramat123

Or elsewhere, heat the pan then put in the pan just before put it the oven?

Tnanks! (And Shabbat Shalom)

 

 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

place the shaped loaves in the greased pans, then final proof and bake.

Paul

ramat123's picture
ramat123

But the crust did not hold the shape of the Challah unlike when I baked on the baking stone.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

by "did not hold the shape of the Challah".  Did you bake the bread in the pan?

Paul

ramat123's picture
ramat123

 Baked in the pan. But when finished (after 30 minues in 190 degrees) the Challah failed to hold its structure.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

That's a good temperature selection but you will need to give the bread more time.  Perhaps 40 minutes, perhaps as much as 50 minutes.  At thirty minutes the bread simply hasn't baked long enough to set the structure, so it collapses without the pan to support it.

Paul

ramat123's picture
ramat123

Or the Friday after that as Passover is coming :)

Thanks  al lot Paul,

David

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

wouldn't be all that interesting, would it?

Shalom