The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking in a Rhomertopf

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Jayne58's picture
Jayne58

Baking in a Rhomertopf

I have been baking  my breads in a Romertoph that I bought a thrift store for $5.  I soak it in water before baking which has been nice to get rid of the stone and water tray in the oven.  My loaves are beautiful.  I put it in a cold oven and turn it on to 450.  

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Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

>SMILE<

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

I use my Romertopf (also from thrift shop!) frequently, but haven't figured out how to make pizza or baguettes in it. :-)

My slashes open great and create the best ears I ever get. I also soak (and then spray with oil) and put in cold oven.

wayne

shastaflour's picture
shastaflour

I bought a Romertopf just about a month ago for the same purpose (and price!) but haven't used it yet. How encouraging to hear that yours works beautifully. Out of curiosity, what size is it? (Ours is the smallest -- the 1.5 qt #110.) Do you wait until the oven and baker are completely preheated to throw in your dough (a la no-knead) or do you put the dough in the soaked baker and let it rise while the oven is heating?

A Lodge cast-iron pizza pan is supposed to be arriving at our house tomorrow, Wayne. I'm pretty excited to see how it works for pizza and maybe other things as well. :)

Marguerite

Jayne58's picture
Jayne58

I bake many of the no knead doughs that are made in large quantities and refrigated.  I line my clay bottom with parchment paper, toss in my dough to raise.  I fill the top with water and set the bottom in to soak until I'm ready to bake.  I then shake off the water before putting the top on.  I put mine in a cold oven and turn on to 450 for about 30 minutes and then take off the top and turn down to 375 until my bread is baked.  Beautiful results every time.  Baking time varies depending on the size do the loaf.  I usually recycle my parchment for at least 2 loaves.  We haven't bought bread since December.  My husband loves my homemade bread.

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

mine is #111, which I think is 3 qt. I usually use around 950 - 1000 gr of dough, I also have started doing the proof in a towel lined basket (as opposed to proofing in the baker). Then slash and put it in the cold baker and cold oven. This keeps the dough from spreading out to fill the baker and makes a slighter better looking loaf.

wayne

Broc's picture
Broc

I use a covered, clay cloche -- similar to a Romertopf.

 

I put the cloche, top on, cold in a cold oven, and preheat to 450F, while the dough is proofing in a similarly shaped tray.  I line the tray with parchment paper, so that I have "handles" to transfer the dough when the dough, cloche and oven are all ready.

 

I transfer the dough to the heated cloche, rapidly score, then cover -- and into the oven for 6 minutes @450F.

 

Then, I lower the temp to 400F.  At 10 minutes, I remove the top of the cloche... the oven spring has done its duty by then!

 

I finish the bake at 350F until 190F to 195F...

 

~ Broc

 

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

Just uploaded some pics of Teresa's (northwestsourdough.com) Basic White with 100% Hydration Starter baked in my Romertopf #111. This was proofed in towel lined basket, baked at 450 for 30 min, uncovered and baked 15 min more at 425.

You may be able to see the effect of proofing in the basket as the loaf didn't fully take on the shape of the clay baker.

shastaflour's picture
shastaflour

OK, now I simply must try it!

:)
Marguerite

ChrissyR's picture
ChrissyR

Your bread is beautiful! I just aquired a Romertopf #110 and am excited to try it (flee market $5, perfect condition).

 

Everyone seems to have their own method for preparing their baker but I am extremely impressed with your photos and the patina on your baker.  If you don't mind, I'd like to summarize your method just to make sure I've got it right.

 

If I followed this thread correctly, you soak the baker, then spray with oil, while the bread rises in a separate towel lined container.  When ready you pop the bread in the cold baker, to a cold oven, pre-heat to 450 and bake for 30 minutes.  Then you remove the top, reduce heat to 425 and bake for 15 minutes more and you are done!

My one question is, do you start timing that first 30 minutes from the moment you put the baker in the oven or from the point the oven reached 450 degrees?

Thanks for your help!

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

I do pat the bottom with a towel to dry excess water off the surface before spraying with oil.

Also, I never wash it with soap, just wipe it out with wet sponge. The bottom no longer seem to absorb as much water due to the patina, but I soak both it and the cover anyway.

My one question is, do you start timing that first 30 minutes from the moment you put the baker in the oven or from the point the oven reached 450 degrees?

Timer starts as soon as bread goes in and oven is immediately turned on so no pre-heating.

good luck -- wayne