The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Seigle d’Auvergne

ananda's picture
ananda

Seigle d’Auvergne

Seigle d’Auvergne


This is very much my own formula adaptation, but it takes its inspiration from Daniel Leader’s lovely book “Local Breads: Sourdough and Whole-grain Recipes from Europe’s Best Artisan Bakers”, see pp. 158 – 161.   Leader credits Armandio Pimenta, who has a bakery in Clermont-Ferrand, Auvergne, as the source for his formula.   My effort does not use the same refreshment regime, nor does it rely on hot water at the mixing stage.   Leader has a photograph of his loaf in the plates between pages 84 and 85 of my edition; the loaves I baked compare well, although I made 2 Miche, scaled at just over 1700g, where Leader’s recipe produces 1 loaf, slightly smaller at 1195g.

Here is the detail:

Rye Sour Refreshment

Day

Date

Sour [g]

Dark Rye [g]

Water [g]

TOTAL [g]

Thursday 22nd March

20:30

40

150

250

440

Friday 23rd March

18:30

440

300

500

1240

 

Final Dough

I made this on the Saturday morning, beginning the mixing at 06:00

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

22.5

450

Water

37.5

750

TOTAL

60

1200

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1.]

60

1200

Shipton Organic Light Rye [997]

50

1000

Marriage’s Organic Strong Flour

27.5

550

Salt

1.6

32

Water

35

700

TOTAL

174.1

3482

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

22.5

-

% overall hydration

72.5

-

% wholegrain flour

22.5

plus 50% @ 0.997 ash

FACTOR

20

-

 

Method:

  • Mix the sourdough, water and flours using a hook attachment, for 4 minutes on first speed, scraping down the bowl as needed.   Autolyse for half an hour.   Add the salt and mix 1 minute on first speed and 5 minutes on second speed, scraping down the bowl as required.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours.
  • Scale the paste using wet hands into 2 pieces and shape round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare 2 bannetons dusted generously with dark rye flour.   Re-shape the dough pieces and place smooth-side up into the bannetons.
  •  Final proof 1 hour.
  • For baking, pre-heat the oven to 280°C for one hour.   Tip the loaf directly onto the hearth stone, apply steam and bake without the fan for 15 minutes at 250°C.   Drop the heat to 200°C, switch to convection and bake out for 50 minutes.
  • Cool on wires

This is the dough at the end of bulk proof:

 Finished Loaf, Crust and Crumb Shots:

 

We enjoyed one of these loaves with our dinner with friends last night.   The depth of flavour from the sourdough was intense; it was an accompaniment to avocado, served with the biggest prawns I have ever seen.   Munching on more of this bread with a salad for lunch today and I noted the sour flavour was much less pronounced, allowing more subtle flavours to come through; much improved to my taste.   The crumb is moist, but not overly so, and wonderfully easy to chew on.

The first loaf stood up tall in the oven, even though the formula uses over 72% rye flour.   I used Organic white bread flour at 11.6% protein, not High Gluten flour.   I should have delayed shaping the second loaf, as the long bake time meant this loaf was over-proved when it came to bake.   I’ve photographed the best-looking loaf, although the crumb shots come from the over-proved one.

We love this bread; such an eating treat for us for the rest of the week.   The Market beckons; this means I have plenty of baking to do this week.

All good wishes

Andy

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Great looking bake as always!

Your crumb looks nice an moist and open.

Thanks for sharing.

Ian

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Ian,

Yes, this bread is very easy to eat!

Thank you for all your kind words

Best wishes

Andy

eliabel's picture
eliabel

Andy,

a beautiful loaf! I was in Auvergne 2 years ago and made photos of their different rye breads. But I wasn't in Thiézac and couldn't try their famous bread. Yours looks more like a Thièzac loaf (the round form, the rustic aspect), thought a Thièzas has 100% of rye flour.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Eliabel,

I found Shiao-Ping's post here which I commented on ages ago soon after finding TFL:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/15350/le-pain-de-seigle-de-thi%C3%A9zac-rye-bread-thi%C3%A9zac

The region of Auvergne apparently produces wheat and rye.   You may well be right that Seigle d'Auvergne should be made from all rye flour.   Personally, I shy away from making 100% rye loaves in bannetons; I like to do these loaves in pans/tins, as you will most likely already be aware of.

Your comments are much appreciated

All good wishes

Andy

ehanner's picture
ehanner

A remarkable looking loaf Andy. The close up of the crust is spectacular. Lots of color in that flour you are using.

Eric

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you so much for your comments Eric, good to hear from you.

As you know I am very attached to the Bacheldre Dark Rye which I use exclusively in the sourdough.   I also used this plus some Gilchesters' Semolina as dust for the bannetons.

Best wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

Really spectacular.   But I had to look twice to see that it was you posting just one bread.   For your own enjoyment.   How nice.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

I've had a fair bit of consultancy and teaching work on.   It was a joy to just make the one type of bread.   When this happens it is not worth firing up the wood-fired oven, of course!

Thank you for your very kind words

Best wishes

Andy

PiPs's picture
PiPs

A magnificent and proud loaf of bread ... no pretensions.

Will give you plenty of energy for all your baking during the week.

Cheers,
Phil

ananda's picture
ananda

You are so right Phil,

This is about as honest a loaf as I can imagine making..and very hearty too

Very good to hear from you; thank you for your kind comments

Best wishes

Andy

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Hi Andy,

Very handsome rye loaf! I've never tried this one, but I'd love to have a taste. As Phil said, this'll keep you going for the remainder of the week!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Hans,

Well it's very nearly 80% Rye, although quite a bit of that is Light Rye.   I am really happy with how this loaf turned out, for sure

It's really good to hear from you

Best wishes

Andy

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I must get back to rye bread baking! Yours are truly inspiring!

I've baked all of the rye breads in the Czech and Polish sections of Local Breads. I should look again at the French pains de siegles. The one you baked certainly is tempting.

David

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi David,

French peasant-style bread made with this level of rye?   Yes you should bake this loaf!   Eliabel suggests this should be made all-rye, as per Shiao-Pimg's post.   I prefer the small amount of wheat, in all honesty.

Looking forward to your post on this already!

Best wishes

Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Andy,
Your bread is every bit as beautiful as Mr. Leader's, and the crust is just like he describes!
I like how Mr. Leader relates the bread's appearance to the region it comes from.
:^) breadsong

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Breadsong,

Thank you for your very generous comments.

The generous dusting of semolina plus Dark Rye flour provided for a lovely crispy crust developing through the bake time of the first loaf.The crust and the volume in this bread were both very pleasing

All good wishes

Andy

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I love the big closeup's of this beautiful bake!  Your the rye man!

Sylvia

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you for your very kind words Sylvia

All good wishes

Andy

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Hi Andy,

Wonderful bread!

The appearance somehow reminds me of the Auvergne landscape.

Best Wishes,

Juergen

ananda's picture
ananda

I'm sure it is quite an amazing place, Juergen

Really good to hear from you

Best wishes

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Such a rustic earthy looking light rye, Andy! Nice work.

Inspire on..

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Khalid,

Light Rye offers plenty glue in the dough, and good baking, so long as the ferment does not go too far.   These are good tasty loaves for sure

All good wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

believe that light rye was like Pierre Nury's Rustic Light Rye where there is almost no rye in the bread :-)  Rye is in the eye of the beholder!

ananda's picture
ananda

The ash content is significant here dabrownman,

Light Rye is 0.997% ash, Dark is anywhere between 1.35 and 1.8%.

Also, Light Rye is finely ground; the Dark Rye I use is very coarse indeed

Apparently an authentic loaf of this kind is made with all rye flour!   I'm only brave enough to make such loaves in pans.

Best wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Another great bake.  I really like this bread.  It looks just like the bread you want to eat.  It should be great with just about anything.  Finally found some dark rye flour yesterday so am putting this up on my bake schedule as soon as we eat all the bread in the freezer :-)

I was thinking maybe it could use some, maybe a small amount 25 g or so, of the fake red rye malt.  What do you think?

You and so many other bakers on TFL are inspirational.  I haven't even heard of 10% the breads you folks are baking.  Thanks for sharing your recipes.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello dabrownman,

I'm sceptical that incorporating Red Rye here will give you what you want.   This is a French traditional recipe, although the real thing is made with 100% rye flours, apparently!   The Red Rye is usually used in conjunction with use of a hot "scald" in Russian bread baking.   Red Rye is best used in formulae for Borodinsky and Rossisky in the Russian tradition.

I look forward to reading your post, whatever you decide to make.

Take care

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to add a scald to your recipe then and see how much worse that butcher's it up than my normal attempt at butchering your recipes. :-)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

version of this bread and it turned out great - even though it appears that my version of  red rye malt isn't - at all.  Just loved this bread with the scald anyway.  Posted it as Seigle d’Auvergne Meets Borodinski.

Thanks for the recipe again.

Bake On.

candis's picture
candis

I am determined to do this for Easter. Inspiring loaf! best wishes, candis

ananda's picture
ananda

You'll love this loaf Candis,

It will be amazing made with your treasured rye sourdough

Very good to hear from you

Best wishes

Andy

candis's picture
candis

I made it this weekend and was going to put it in the freezer for Easter. nearly half gone already! I have a French cousin coming...but really don't have the energy to do it again so will have to slice it before they arrive. thanks a lot, it is on the favorites list forever.

olegarr's picture
olegarr

Andy,

Great bread!!! Thanks a lot for the recipe!

Just one question: You wrote "Drop the heat to 200°C, switch to convection and bake out for 50 minutes." when I switch to convection the temperature drops a little (about 15°C), so the question is should I program my oven to 200°C convection (and in reality have 185 + fan) or to 215 (at that case I'll have 200°C + fun)?

Thanks a lot!

Oleg

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Oleg,

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you; I had a few weeks away from the Board to finish my studies.

Do you have an oven thermometer to use to monitor the real temperature inside your oven?

Ordinarily, I find the exact opposite effect with switching to Convection.   I tend to compensate by lowering the temperature by 15*C to stop bread from becoming too dark.   Do note, however, that these are very big loaves....over 1700g.   They are also dense-textured, so a lengthy and solid bake is essential.   They have to be in the oven a minimum of 1 hour.   After that, you can use a probe to ensure the core temperature has reached 96*C.   These 2 measures would be my initial baking parameters.

All good wishes

Andy

olegarr's picture
olegarr

Andy,

Thanks a lot for your reply.

This bread (I just follow your recipe) is my favorite one!!! I am baking it at least once per week and give as presents to my friends. Thanks a lot for the recipe!

Let me just rephrase the question a little (and ask one more:).

The temperature numbers that you provided is the actual temperature in the oven, is it correct?

Also, when I am making just one smaller loaf and just dividing your recipe by 3 (for example) the bread always turns out nice.  But can I skip separate 2.5+1 hour proofing phases and just put it into the proofing basket for 3.5 hours?

Thanks a lot,

Oleg

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Oleg,

I don't think you will get away with a single proof in the banneton I'm afraid.   You could give it a try, but there is a danger that the bread will be overly dense.

However, the principles espoused by Leader ensure relatively rapid fermentation, as the process uses hot water.   Do you have a copy of Local Breads by Daniel Leader?

The temperatures I cite are the real temperatures for my SMEG electric oven.   However, I usually bake wood-fired, in my brick oven, so the baking temperatures can be much more variable!

Many thanks for you compliments; I am really glad to read how much you like this bread.

Best wishes

Andy

olegarr's picture
olegarr

Andy,

Yes, I have Local Breads by Daniel Leader and I read this recipe over there, but looks like there is a mistake in the quantity of water in the book.  That's why I am using yours.

Thanks,

Oleg

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Oleg,

I'll send you a pm later with more advice.   If you have the book it will make sense to you.   I realise in this post I didn't use the hot water process, but I do now.   It will speed up your bulk time, I'm sure.   Yes, the book is legendary for its errors, I'm afraid.

Best wishes

Andy

olegarr's picture
olegarr

Andy,

Thanks a lot! I will wait for your letter.

I have Russian roots and this one is my favorite bread by far!

Thanks,

Oleg

olegarr's picture
olegarr

Andy,

How about more advices you promised? :)  I am going to bake this bread again this weekend. Cannot eat “regular” bread anymore and miss the good one badly, so have to bake it myself.

 Please forgive me if I missed your email somehow (just come back from 2 weeks vacation and had hundreds emails to go through).

Thanks a lot,

Oleg

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Oleg,

When you log into TFL, you should see "Messages" in the top left of the options. Click on that and there should be a message from me.

Let me know if you still can't find it, but there is plenty of detail waiting there for you

Best wishes

Andy

olegarr's picture
olegarr

Andy,

Just noticed it (would expect some notification from TFL).  Thanks a lot! !!

And, yes, I follow your blog already:)

Again, thanks a lot and I know already my plans for weekend!

Oleg