The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Gluten free sourdough

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Minerva's picture
Minerva

Gluten free sourdough

Hello fellow bakers, I am an Australian woman allergic to gluten. While I have baked "normal" bread for more than 30 years, my glutenfree breads have been unpredictable and, on the whole, disappointing. My more successful loaves have been using sorghum flour. I have recently discovered this site and found that sourdough glutenfree is possible so I am about to start on this journey. I guess I will have to start a journal to keep track of minor changes. I have not done this in the past. My earlier bread baking has been intuitive. I know by look and feel when there is enough flour, yeast or whatever from years of practice. Gluten free is another story! I have bought some kefir to start my starter this weekend. I would love to communicate with other celiac bakers who have been successful. My aim is to make baguettes with a nice crust and moist inside, unlike the commercial g/f buns, challa, sourdough loaf, and a spicy brioche type bread called chorag. It is an Armenian bread that is plaited like challa. Thank you all for such a great site. It is all to much to take in at once but your experience will be a wonderful resource.

Minerva

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Minerva, I have no problems with gluten myself, but a bread loving friend who developed an intolerance. After looking through several websites I found one GF sourdough recipe that worked really well, and one for a GF sandwich loaf from a facebook friend, that was amazingly good, too.

The sourdough recipe is from  Jean Leighton (gfdoctorrecipes.com), it can be shaped (or patted) into baguettes, too (I made only the regular loaf).

I was quite happy with those results, and my gluten intolerant friend loved them. Before I had only experience with (great) GF cupcakes, and thought you couldn't produce a GF bread that tastes other than like cardboard.

Karin

SCruz's picture
SCruz

Karin:

I checked gfdoctorrecipes.com and found comments about the recipe, but not the recipe itself. ???

Your leinsamenbrot fan in Santa Cruz,

Jerry

clazar123's picture
clazar123
hanseata's picture
hanseata

For some reason I misspelled the name - it is the same recipe. I exchanged some ingredients that I didn't have with others I had, and it worked just fine:

I used quinoa (instead of millet), all tapioca (instead of tapioca and potato flour), garbanzo flour (instead of garfava), soybean flour (instead of white bean flour).

In the recipe the bread is just brushed with water. I rather used steam.

This picture has somewhat distorted colors because of the flash - it didn't look quite as yellow/red.

The crumb, of course, looks very different from a regular bread. We were a bit sceptical when we tried it, but, to our astonishment, the bread tasted like a real sourdough, and we liked it!

Karin

 

 

Minerva's picture
Minerva

Thank you all for your comments. There is a lot of enthusiasm out there.

Minerva

 

tartine-y's picture
tartine-y

hi there,

so wonderful to find these posts!  my mum is gluten-free ceoliac, and she is getting cross at my total obsession with sourdough bread, so it's my daughterly duty to give GF bakinga proper try, not just biscuits and cakes!  So I'll be trying these  links above. 

1 question - does a good quality GF flour mix be substituted for the variety of flours listed? These days they mix a whole lot of flours to make the commercial mixes. Anyone tried with just a good commercial blend?

Huge thanks, and pls keep posting your ideas & suggestions.  sophia 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

There are some, Bob's Red Mill and King Arthur produce GF all-purpose flours. I never tried any, though, so I can't say anything about them.

Karin

tartine-y's picture
tartine-y

thank you!

Staffo's picture
Staffo

Hi, 

I haven't stopped by for a while - too much time in the kitchen!  ;-)

I have been making real GF sourdough for a while. You can see some of my work here: bit.ly/xpXWJR 

I also make pretty decent GF pastry and GF yeasted breads. I'm building a website, but until that is ready you can view pics of my pastries and breads here: www.recipesforliving.info

I started off with ready made gf flour mixes, but now I make my own. I keep sourdough starters made from buckwheat, millet and quinoa respectively.  Each is a straight flour and water based starter. I make long and short pre-ferment sourdough.

If you like the look of my breads/ pastries, I am happy to chat.

Staffo

 

guapomole's picture
guapomole

My friend has a glutenintolerance and mentioned sourdough made from anaturally fermented starter as possibly being safe to eat.  I came across this article that seems to support thuIs idea with the appropriate starter being used: http://www.cheeseslave.com/sourdough-and-bone-broth-for-gluten-intolerance/

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Please do not rely on pseudo science and anecdotal misinformation to treat a serious medical issue. Sourdough, unless it is made with non-gluten containing starches, is usually made with wheat flour or rye flour. People with serious celiac disease or gluten intolerance/allergy cannot eat this. Some are even affected when they are exposed to miniscule amounts. Your friend should be diagnosed and consult with professionals that are expert in this issue. A medical diagnosis is a good place to start and then counselling with a registered dietician or formally trained nutritionist(trained at a REAL school).

Certainly, probiotic and naturally fermented foods aid the digestive tract of many people. This would be yogurt,kefir,fermented vegetables such as kimchee or sauerkraut and water kefir and kombucha tea.

Staffo's picture
Staffo

This is sound advice. Gluten allergy is a serious matter. There are a range of other medical conditions associated with celiac disease.  It is important to get competent medical assistance and advice.

Staffo's picture
Staffo

There are some dangerous myths around about sourdough and gluten that could be quickly debunked with a little clear thinking. Sourdough, and regular bread making rely on gluten to make bread. They develop the gluten through kneading etc. If sourdough culture eliminated the gluten, sourdough breadmaking would not work.

There has been some work done on the use of fermentation to reduce the amount of gluten in breads. An Italian company has filed patents, in Australia, and most likely in other places. I came across the listings when I was assessing the viability of filing for a patent on some of my work on gluten free breads.  The Italian work was done in a laboratory where the success, or otherwise, of the technique could be properly tested and claims assessed. Their patents are specific about strains of bacteria used. This is not the sort of work that could be done at home. 

I have read, in publications about bread science, about some enzymes breaking gluten down. However, there was still gluten in the bread. Gluten was not eliminated, just modified.

The only safe way to make gluten free bread is to work in a gluten free environment, with gluten free ingredients. There are many approaches to making gluten free breads and gluten free sourdough. Most that are published use gums and batters. I have developed recipes for kneadable breads that can be baked free form. Here are just a few photos:


Buckwheat & Honey Bread (yeasted)

Focaccia Style Millet Bread (sourdough)

Sorghum Multi-seed Bread (yeasted)

Buckwheat Bread (sourdough)

Crumb of the Buckwheat Bread (sourdough)

Recipes for yeasted gluten free breads are available from www.recipesforliving.info.

I provide individual online tutoring with the gluten free sourdough. If you are interested, please send me a message.

Staffo.

guapomole's picture
guapomole

Yeah, I would never recommend a casual home baker to just make sourdough and start handing it out to their friends with celiac disease or even just a gluten intolerance.  In fact, the link I posted referrenced an Italian study that was published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, which I'm guessing you are also referring to as well.

"A study published in February, 2004 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology with the tantalizing title “Sourdough Bread Made from Wheat and Nontoxic Flours and Started with Selected Lactobacilli Is Tolerated in Celiac Sprue Patients,” describes the results of an Italian research team which, encouraged by preliminary findings of their earlier work in vitro, designed an in vivo experiment to test their findings. The team’s premise was that lactobacilli, chosen for their ability to hydrolyze or sever protein (gliadin) fractions might be key in processing wheat flour so that its toxic properties would be neutralized and therefore not harmful to celiac patients.

Their experiment included 17 subjects, all celiac patients who had been consuming gluten-free diets for at least two years and no longer exhibiting symptoms. The experimental bread was made from a combination of wheat (Triticum aestivum), oat, millet and buckwheat flours, 30 percent of which was wheat. The flour was mixed with a “broth” of four lab-obtained lactobacilli, a dose of baker’s yeast and tap water in a continuous high-speed mixer. When the dough was allowed to ferment at about body temperature for 24 hours, almost all of the toxic peptide fractions in the wheat protein had been hydrolized. The bread was then baked and fed to the celiac volunteers (who also bravely ate breads made with plain baker’s yeast as “controls”). After consuming the simple yeasted bread, analysis of the volunteers’ gut permeability was made, which showed a change in permeability normally associated with celiac response. No such response was noted when the volunteers ate the 24-hour fermented sourdough bread. The authors of the study are cautiously enthusiastic about the results of this “novel bread biotechnology” and its implications for celiac patients."

Mylissa20's picture
Mylissa20

Do you have the reference for that study?  I would LOVE to read it!

Staffo's picture
Staffo

The research team seems to have been working on ways to reduce gluten intolerance, not making gluten free bread. The title seems to suggest that their bread is safe for people with celiac sprue, but the end of the abstract talks about reducing intolerance, presumably the level of exposure to gluten could be reduced using the results of their work.

Here is a link to the abstract:

http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/14766592

Looks very interesting, but it is not making GF bread from sourdough. If you want to make genuine GF sourdough, is with kneadable dough, not batter, see my work at:

http://recipesforliving.info

Staffo