The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Help needed

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bertie26's picture
bertie26

Help needed

Hello All 

I am lookimg for a recipe for a walnut and treacle yeast bread or anything similar that i can adapt. 

Thank you in advance for your help Albert

HeidiH's picture
HeidiH

In fact, as we speak, an anadama loaf is between stretch-and-folds.   Anadama is a New England bread characterized by including corn meal and molasses.  I like adding a bit of whole wheat and rye to get a darker, moister anadama.  Sometimes I also add the zest of a lemon but since this batch has lemon-based whey as its liquid, I skipped that.

I consider the molasses to be sugar and count it as a liquid.  So, in today's case, as I was emptying the last inch of a jar, I just added the whey I was using to make up the amount of liquid I wanted. 

Today's bread will be moist and a bit dense despite the high hydration (80%) because of the presence of corn meal and rye. 

90 g (15%) corn meal

90 g (15%) white rye

180 g (30%) white whole wheat

240 g (40%) bread flour

9 g (1.5 %) instant yeast

12 g (2%) salt

40 g (ca. 7%), give or take, molasses

440 g (ca 73%), give or take, whey from a batch of whole milk ricotta made with a lemon

The molasses and whey add up to 480 g (80%) but since I was using the whey to coax the last of the molasses out of a jar, the actual proportions are approximate.  When I am getting the molasses out of a new jar for such a bread, I aim for 40g but molasses is very difficult to measure precisely, so I usually put the molasses in the bowl on the scale and then add until I reach the total liquid amount I'm aiming for.  Then I whisk the liquid and molasses together before I pour them into the flour.

I imagine you could work with treacle the same way.   It's going to go through two or three stretch and fold cycles and then will be formed and baked at either 350 F for 75 min. or 375 F for 60 min. depending on how dense it seems to want to be.  If denser, I'll cook it lower and slower.  I generally don't do very hot baking because I'm not that fond of carmelized crust.