The Fresh Loaf

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Tartine Country Bread without combo cooker

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wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

Tartine Country Bread without combo cooker

I just made the Tartine Country Bread for a second time. I do not have a combo cooker and thought I would share my results with alternatives.

Both times I followed Chad's recipe and process carefully, but was afraid to add all the additional water the first attempt so used about half. The first attempt I did final proof in a colander lined with floured towel, pre-heated oven with Fibrament stone and baked in 8" cake pan with stainless "magic" bowl to hold in moisture. This worked OK, and had good oven spring and slashes (square pattern) opened nicely. Crumb was not as open as I hoped based on the oven spring.

For the second attempt, I decided to try my Romertopf #111 Clay Baker. I did add all the extra water and I proofed the first loaf in the clay baker and baked starting in cold oven. Since the dough is pretty slack it spread to take the shape of the clay baker in spite of my attempt to shape with good surface tension, but had nice spring and I removed the cover after 30 min (450) and baked another 25 min which gave pretty nice color.

The second loaf was retarded in floured towel in oval wicker basket (in refer inside plastic bag) for about 6 hours to fit my schedule. I let sit on the counter for about an hour before transfering to the clay baker and baking starting in cold oven. The transfer was not as smooth as I hoped as it landed a bit sideways, but I left it alone and slashed it, one long slash which again was not perfect, but I resisted the temptation to mess with it.

Again uncovered after 30 minutes. This loaf had great oven spring and since it didn't have time to settle down into the baker it was a much more attractive shape and the slash opened and created a fantastic ear. Almost as nice as some of David's (dmsnyder) :-). Really! Both loaves had nice blistered crust.

This loaf was taken to a neighbor's for dinner and served with seasoned olive oil dipping sauce. It was a big hit! Proudest moment for a home baker is to have others compliment the results.

To summarize, best results were from proofing in basket and baking in clay baker (cold oven). I will now try this technique with Teresa's Basic White Sourdough using 100%Hydration Starter

wayne

Comments

spsq's picture
spsq

since I put one loaf in a combo cooker, and one in a clay baker, this is a timely post.  I think I'll try the clay baker in a cold start oven:  I was preheating both cookers.    Re:  the dough taking the shape of the clay baker.   I've always let my dough rise in a small oval basket,  then plopped it into the hot baker.  If you don't want the shape of the baker, try this.  (though for me, it sticks to my well-floured towel about 80% of the time, so maybe I should try letting it rise in the baker anyway!)

 

 

ntyhurst's picture
ntyhurst

why are you putting it in a cold oven and not preheating the baker and the oven first like the combo cooker?

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

start a cold DO in a cold oven.  Just add the time it takes for the oven to come up to temperature to the bake before removing the lid.  Do it all the time no problem.  Or you can do a cold DO in a hot oven if it is cast iron.  No more burning myself either :-)  Chad Robertson does cold DO in a hot oven and has a video showing it.

ntyhurst's picture
ntyhurst

"DO" ?

baybakin's picture
baybakin

DO = Dutch Oven.  Personally I like to use a cold DO in a pre-heated oven, I even do the final proof right in the dutch oven!

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

I usually bake two Tartine loaves side by side, one in a 5 qt cast iron dutch oven (using the lid as a base and the larger portion as the dome), the other an Emile Henri clay baker. I preheat the oven, but not the vessels. I definitely get more rise from the clay baker, but probably because the sides are supported.  Incidentally, I've also begun adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to my Tartines with a higher concentration of whole wheat (up to 40%). I get a very nice crumb from the oil and great flavor and texture from the whole wheat.  

aspenhound's picture
aspenhound

I am using a dutch oven to bake my tartine country bread and mine always turn great. I am thinking to buy a clay pot as my second one because it is much cheaper. Is there a difference in quality of breads (crusty outside and moistness inside...) using dutch oven and clay pot? Can you put your clay pot at 500F oven? 

ntyhurst's picture
ntyhurst

i've tried three times now to put it in a cold oven in a cold clay baker. the first time the dough was not covered in the fridge. i pulled it out. plopped it in and the results were great. the second and third times, the dough was covered in the fridge, and it stuck to the baker real bad. matter of fact, i ended up breaking the romertopf this morning trying to get the bread out. my theory is that the skin that develops when the dough isn't covered in the fridge kept it form sticking the first time. have you had sticking problems with this method?

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

I never have a problem with bread sticking to the baker as long as I remember to spray it with oil first. My Romertopf was bought used and looks like it had a lot of use. The sides look like they absorbed a lot of oil/grease over the years (sheds water like crazy), but the bottom will stick if I don't spray it (don't ask). Sorry you broke yours, I would be crushed.

wayne

 

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

The one time I forgot to spray my baking vessel, the bread did stick.  After trying unsuccessfully to pry it out, I decided to just wait and see what happens.  After the bread cooled, it came out easily.