The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How to make heavy cream for whip

satimis's picture
satimis

How to make heavy cream for whip

Hi all,

Where can I find the recipe for heavy cream to be used for whipping?

Heavy Cream Substitute
3/4 cup milk
1/3 cup butter

is NOT for whip

TIA

B.R.
satimis

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

if beaten beyond whipping, heavy cream separates into butter and skim milk.

In order to get heavy cream, you need a lactating cow, a bucket or similar container and a three legged stool.  Skip the bucket and stool (plus warm hands and making friends with the cow) if you can just get a hold of heavy cream.   Also sold as whipping cream.  The cream, being fat (and good fat too!) floats to the top of fresh milk when allowed to stand and separate.  More in wiki.  :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

cream was used to make butter and the remainder was buttermilk not skim milk?

janij's picture
janij

Cream is shaken or whipped til it seperates into butter and butter milk.  But the butter milk you get is not the same as buttermilk from the store.  Buttermilk from the store is cultured skim milk.

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Just this week I made fresh buttermilk but I used whole milk.  I have never done it before and wasn't sure what type to use.  Are you supposed to use skim milk?  If so, why? 

Mine turned out really thick and very nice tasting.  I am using it in breads I am baking this week to see how it compares with yogurt.

Sorry, this isn't really about making cream but I saw 'buttemilk' and it caught me eye today...

Thanks,

Janet

janij's picture
janij

It doesn'tmatter what kind of milk you use as long as it is not ultrapasteurized.  But the store bought kind is made of skim milk.  I think they use skim in the store because they can get more money out of the cream selling it elsewhere.  Whole milk will make it thicker than skim.  How does it compare with yogurt in baking?

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Janie

In two words:  more work  :-)

I bought a starter for buttermilk/sour cream a few months ago and just now have been experimenting.

Did the sour cream portion last week and response from people who eat my bread was that there isn't much difference in taste.  The buttermilk is this week and I am expecting the same response as it uses the same culture.  Just turns out thinner because milk is used instead of cream.  Same nice sweet creamy taste in each.

Yogurt is simpler and is what I usually use but I don't make it.  After this experiment I will probably go back to yogurt.  (When making b.milk and s.cream I ended up making 1/2 gallon each batch as the inoculation is tiny so I had a lot to use up in breads.....)

Janet

janij's picture
janij

Did you buy them thru New England Cheese?  You can buy bulk dry starter culture, The Dairy Connection is where I got mine last.  When I make sour cream, I used to make it by the qt.  Now I do it by pint.  You only need 1/16 tsp or so of culture.  But if you are buying the prepackaged direct sets you can do just a qt and it will work fine.

I used to make buttermilk all the time.  I used it as the starter for my cheese.  But I found the bulk starter and it is just easier.  ( I make 4 gallon batches of cheese at a time, not 2 gallon)  But I always have yogurt.  If you don't make it you should try it.  It is so easy.

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Janij,

I got my culture from Cultures for Health.  I will have to check out your source.  Mine only uses about 1/16 tsp. too.  I just made a larger amount due to the work involved.  I would make it more often as it tastes wonderful but nobody here will eat or drink it so it has to be used in breads....

I used to make yogurt too but now I buy it.  I eat only goat yogurt and it is a bit tricky to get it to set.  

When making your buttermilk and s.cream do you just:

  • heat the milk up to 185° 
  •  let it cool to 77°  
  •  stir the culture in
  • let it sit at 77° for 16-18 hrs? 

How long does yours stay fresh once you have made it and refrigerated it?  

Janet

janij's picture
janij

I only heat my milk to 86 then add the culture and leave it at room temp til it is thick- depends on what temp my house is.  I heat to 185 when I make yogurt.  What kind of milk do you use?  My buttermilk and sour cream stay fresh at least a month after I make it.  I do use raw milk though.  I had nubian goats before I bought the jersey cows.  Goat make the best yogurt, but I never had a hard time getting it to set.  Where did you get the goat milk?

We love fresh milk products.  Baked potatoes are a huge dinner item at our house.  Fresh butter, sour cream and cheese.

 

janij's picture
janij

And I do think they make lowfat buttermilk.  I haven't been down the dairy isle in over a yr.  So not all buttermilk is made of skim milk.  But if you culture non homogonized milk you will get sour cream on top and buttermilk on the bottom.

 

EvaGal's picture
EvaGal

Ahh, one of the more humbling episodes of how the neighborhood turns... Hand Milking that doe-eyed jersey while they were out of town took all morning, all three of us (already very experienced in livestock handling), nearly amputated my thumb in the cow stanchion, and came home with a half gallon of 2%.  I gladly pay whatever they ask at the store for heavy whipping cream now. :) {grateful to be able to type with that thumb}

EvaGal

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

In my experience the best way to get heavy cream is to have neighbors who own a cow....a Jersey, not a Holstein.

Jeff

gerhard's picture
gerhard

I am not sure why you want to make your own whipping cream but your butter and milk recipe will give you the fat equivalent but it needs to be properly emulsified to whip.  There are lots of good reasons to use comercially made whipping cream and one biggy is shelf life.

Gerhard

janij's picture
janij

I have lactating cows and it is not just any cream. You need the top, thick, spoonable cream.  Light cream won't whip.  Or at least not for me.  I would not recommend getting a cow.  But if you do, a Jersey is the way to go.  They have excellent cream.

 

BettyR's picture
BettyR

A French Press coffee maker does a pretty good job of emulsifying you might try that and see if it would work. I'd be curious to know.

Gerhard -

I don't know why Satimis wants a sub for heavy cream but I have in the past found myself out of cream and really wishing I could come up with a passable substitute. I live in a rural area and the nearest grocery store is an hour round trip so there is no popping out to the store to grab an ingredient that you have run out of. You either come up with a sub or do without until grocery day.

gerhard's picture
gerhard

I was not suggesting that it is incomprehensible to want to substitute whipping cream with an alternative.  I often use whipping cream to cook a caramel and in those recipes the whipping cream is used for it's fat content and not it's whipping qualities so her substitution would work fine, if you wanted to whip it maybe it would be less than ideal.  In our area whipping cream has 35% butter fat but I know that there is variation from region to region, I have seen it as high as 39% and I am sure that there may even be higher numbers out there.

Gerhard

BettyR's picture
BettyR

My main use for cream is to lighten my morning coffee and my nightly hot cocoa right before bed. I'm a little embarrassed to admit it but I have gotten so addicted to that little splash of cream in my beverages that I just don't want them without it. So taste would be my main concern.

The small grocery stores around here are very over priced so we make the two hour drive into Houston once a month to purchase a months worth of groceries. Lately I've been doing a better job of estimating our needs for the month and haven't been running out. But if I find myself short in the near future I will give this a try and let y'all know if it worked.

gerhard's picture
gerhard

I think you may well end up with a puddle of butter oil on the top of your beverage.

Gerhard

BettyR's picture
BettyR

Yeah, your probably right....

satimis's picture
satimis

Hi all,

Lot of thanks for your reply.

I use whipping cream for cake topping as well as serving Cappuchino NOT for cooking.  I don't expect keeping too many varieties of ingredients at home, looking like a grocery.  Butter and milk are available in refrigerator and we need them daily.

satimis

 

 

lazybaker's picture
lazybaker

If it's a matter of space in the fridge, I've seen some heavy whipping cream sold in half pint containers. As for a cake topping, you can always make frosting from egg whites, like an Italian Meringue or Swiss Meringue buttercream. It won't be the same as whipped cream. 

sonia101's picture
sonia101

 

Directions:
  1. 1Combine water, lemon juice and vanilla. Stir in nonfat dry milk poweder.
  2. 2Beat 5-10 minutes or until stuff. Add sugar. Beat 1-2 minutes.
  3. 3If topping should separate, beat again just before serving


Read more: http://www.food.com/recipe/whipped-cream-substitute-278191#ixzz1qG3HVhZm

Or this might help

http://nuttykitchen.com/2010/06/01/coconut-whipped-cream/

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

once.  Needed a butter cream and I did add powdered cocoa and a little powdered sugar.  I let the butter warm up to soft but not melting and slowly added very cold milk alternating with powdered cocoa.  I can't remember the order if I added cocoa first or milk but I did build up a lot of volume and ended up frosting a cake with it.  If you have an emergency, try it.  You can also whip a small amount of cold pudding (a spoon at a time) into the beating butter for volume.  Used the lowest mixer setting.

EvaB's picture
EvaB

Pacific evaporated milk there was how to do it on the can. Its probably easier to whip that than regular whole milk, but you should be able to do that, since I use a small amount of icing sugar or cornstarch to stabelize the whipped cream anyway. But really there is no substitute that will be as good as real heavy cream (33-35%) and a bit of icing sugar and vanilla.

The thing about substituing the canned milk or the whole milk is that neither will get as much volume as the heavy cream, and won't have the same taste. I even notice the difference between the 33% and the 35% creams (different companies) as to volume when using the exact same measure of cream.