The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Weird Sandwich Bread Recipe

Nersh's picture
Nersh

Weird Sandwich Bread Recipe

Hi TFL,

 

So I found this rather odd Honey Wheat Sandwich bread recipe. I'll post it below and ya'll can tell me what you think. I tried it after only glancing at it and it almost worked. The weirdest part was the ending where it wanted me to bake the loaf for approx. twenty minutes and then cover the crust in butter and wrap it in tin foil for thirty minutes. I'm new to baking so maybe this is just some method I've never seen. I followed the recipe and my only complaint was that the bottom came out a little doughy. I popped it back into the oven, where it currently sits. I think they were trying to get the density right for sandwich bread. I don't know. I may just toss it. Here ya'll go, tell me if I'm the only one that thinks this recipe is odd.

 

Easy Honey Wheat Sandwich Bread

Ingredients:

-1/3 cup honey, microwaved-then-cooled-slightly

-2 cups white bread flour

-1 cup whole wheat flour

-1 cup warm water

-1 packet Rapid Rise (or regular) breadmaker’s yeast

-1/2 tablespoon salt

-butter/margarine

Directions:

Microwave 1/3 cup honey for 15 seconds or so until it is a thin liquid. Set aside to cool slightly.

In your breadbowl, quickly stir 1 cup white bread flour with 1 cup warm (not hot!) water. (110 degrees is good.)

Add 1/2 tablespoon salt and 1 packet Rapid Rise (or regular) breadmaker’s yeast, and stir briskly with a wooden spoon.

Next, add your honey and mix well. Add 1 cup whole wheat flour and 1/2 cup more of the bread flour. Stir as long as you can with your spoon, and then flour up your hands and the top of your dough ball with another 1/2 cup white bread flour. Work as much of the remaining flour as you can into the dough with your hands, and then cover bowl with a damp dishtowel (or plastic wrap ) and let it rest for about ten or fifteen minutes.

Flour your counter (or other breadmaking surface) and place dough in the middle. Stand on a stool if you’re short like me to make sure you have plenty of leverage to properly knead the bread.

Smack the center of the dough and begin kneading once dough has initially “shrunken away” from the handprint.

Butter your loaf pan. (If you like a wide, flatter bread, go with a large pan. For a more square, store-like shape to your slices, use a smaller loaf pan.)

Shape the dough into a loaf shape and place in the pan, or for a more uniform, flatter, sandwich-ey top to the loaf, simply press the dough into the pan and smooth around until top is level.

Cover top of pan loosely with plastic wrap and place in a warm place to rise for 1 hour. (If you leave it on a cool kitchen counter, it won’t rise nearly so much and you’ll have a pretty small finished loaf of bread.)

After 45 minutes of rising time, preheat oven to 350 degrees. When dough has finished rising, remove plastic wrap, place loaf pan(s) on a cookie sheet, and then into the oven.

Bake 15-20 minutes. Remove from oven when tops have just begun to turn golden tan. Remove from loaf pan and coat entire crust with butter or margarine. Wrap immediately in aluminum foil and place elevated on wire rack to cool for 30 minutes before slicing.

Stored unused portion of loaf in Tupperware unsliced for longer shelf life.

 

~comes from redkitchenproject.com

sharon.anders's picture
sharon.anders

I've often brushed melted butter over the crust after the loaf has finished baking if I'm aiming for a soft crust loaf. Wrapping in foil would just hold in the moisture as the bread cools. The recipe is trying to maintain a soft crust all around. This can still be achieved without underbaking the bread. If the soft crust is your intent, try baking a loaf like this for 25-35 minutes, brush the top,sides and bottom lightly with melted butter and allow to cool on a rack without foil.