The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Smaller loaves

captk's picture
captk

Smaller loaves

Hi all very new to this site have gained much good advise and direction. I am 50 ish and am really enjoying learning how to make bread. my question is whem making smaller loaves how do you adjust times or temps? most of the folks i give my bread to are older or single and a full loaf goes to waste. any thoughts thanx Bill.

 

wally's picture
wally

It's difficult to answer your question without knowing what size loaf you are contemplating.  However, you can always bake a 'normal' sized loaf and tell the recipient to slice it in half (or whatever) and freeze a portion.  Even in a frost-free fridge it will last a number of weeks and be no worse the wear when thawed out if wrapped well.

Larry

bob13's picture
bob13

    Another way is by using the internal temp of the bread.  Most receipes will give a "bake @ XXX degrees for XXX minutes, or until a thump on the bottom of the loaf sound hollow, or an internal temperature of XXX degrees".  I've found that when I scale up or down a batch size always us wieght and not volume to measure ingredients by, and bake to temperature for doneness.  I use a probe thermoter like for when I cook on the outdoor grill with a probe on it, you could also use an instant read type I would think.  Hope this helps you.

mcs's picture
mcs

If I bake a 24 ounce boule at 405F for 36 minutes, I bake a 12 ounce (half loaf) boule at 405F for 28 minutes.  The 'cookedness' will be similar.
Lots of customers prefer the half loaves because of the reason you stated and besides that, they're 'oh-so-cute'. 

-Mark

bob13's picture
bob13

   I forgot to include in my answer, the usual loaf of bread is done when the internal temp is 200F , 94 C on the internal probe.  It makes no difference how large or small the loaf is, just remember that smaller loaves reach this temp much faster than larger loaves.  On some of my larger loaves I need to cover the top with foil to prevent over browning of the crust, and on some of the smaller ones I need to egg wash the top to get the color I want.  It's a lot of trial and error but that is what I find so much fun in bread making.  You can do pretty much try anthing you want and get different results, just don't play too much with the formula as this really is science at it's most flavorable!!!!!  The worst that can happen is you get to eat the results of your efforts and that's not a bad thing, just some are better than others.

Bob

captk's picture
captk

Thanks for the reply Bob I am tryin the temp thing and ajusting as needed. and our cross to bear is that we must eat our mistakes. i  make lots of mistakes LOL thanks Bill

 

 

bob13's picture
bob13

captk, how'd the bread turn out for you?   I am putting two mini loaves in the oven this morning, one is a sour dough rye, which we'll eat with bean soup tonight, and the other is an asiago sundried tomato artisian type round hearth loaf which I love with a little fresh butter and red wine.

 

Bob