The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Yeast - hot or cold water?

pizzagirl's picture
pizzagirl

Yeast - hot or cold water?

I'm trying my hand at grilled pizza tomorrow and wanted to make the dough tonight. The recipe calls for instant yeast and ice cold water. The only yeast my local grocer had is Fleischmann's RapidRise Highly Active Yeast, which says it's an "instant yeast" on the back of the package, which is exactly what the recipe calls for. But, the instructions on the yeast package also say to use 120-130 degree water. Which do I use...cold water like the recipe calls for or warm water like the yeast package calls for? I don't want to waste good flour, much less my time, on dough that won't rise.

The recipe I want to try is below. Anyone have any insights to this dilemma?

http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/001199.html

Thanks

patnx2's picture
patnx2

this is a good recipe and should come out great.Patrick

patnx2's picture
patnx2

this is a good recipe and should come out great.Patrick

dhass's picture
dhass

I use cold well water, not ice cold water, in all my recipes using instant yeast.

However, you MUST mix the yeast and flour before adding water.

When cold water comes into direct contact with yeast it kills the yeast dead. I know, I've done it.

I confirmed my observations by calling several yeast manufacturers and they confirmed them.

Cold water slows down the fermentation process allowing more flavor development over long time periods.

You could also try making 2 batches of dough at the same time, using cold water in one and warm in the other.  Let us know the results.

pizzagirl's picture
pizzagirl

Well, the pizza didn't turn out as well as expected, but it was edible. I followed the recipe exactly, and let the dough sit in the refrigerator overnight. I had a bit of trouble getting the dough as thin as I wanted. I can't flip it in the air either. I have RA and my hands are usually causing me some issues. The first pizza I made, I put it on the grill. The edges were thicker than I wanted, and the dough didn't have the consistency that I want. I like the chewy, full of air pockets type of pizza. I started to think it must've been the grill. So the next night I made the same pizza in the oven on a stone. I had pretty much the same results as I did on the grill. Edible, but not what I wanted.

I'm totally new at this, so I'm sure the fault lays in something that I did, or didn't do....but right now, I can't figure out what that is to correct it.

patnx2's picture
patnx2

makes perfect. To get the perfect pizza or bread is more compicated then just a recipe. So many factors.that is why there are so many "poor examples" in pizza shops. You might go to pizza making.com and there there are many with ideas and a library of past posts. Be prepared to be bewildered with all the factors in volved in making great pizza. Have fun. Even not perfect home pizza is very etable. Patrick

keebs45's picture
keebs45

Hi, sorry to hijack your post but I just made the same recipe last night.  I realized after I put the dough in the fridge that it called for Instant yeast & I had used Active.  Does anyone know if this will still work (I did not activate the yeast in water before using it, I just mixed it in directly with the flour)?  If not is there a way to save my dough?  I'm not planning on using it until Friday so if it's not going to work I can just make a new batch tonight.  I've been making my own pizzas for a while now using store bought dough but they don't carry the brand I like anymore so I thought I'd try my hand at making my own.  Thanks! Jaime