The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sliced bread cold to the touch

saxobob's picture
saxobob

Sliced bread cold to the touch

Hello,

My first post here!

A strange Q, I know - on many occasions, particularly sourdough, and yesterday malted grain flour, my loaf (standard ratio flour/water/yeast/salt  100% / 60% / 1% / 5%  turns out normal but the slices are noticalbly cold to the touch.  Wierd.    These loaves when toasted end up super-hot too. 

Any ideas?  The bread is still very tasty, but a little wierd as it touches your lips.

Thanks

Rob

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

Objects at room temperature often feel cold when you touch them since your body temp is so much higher than room temperature.  The air around us is a very poor conductor of heat, but metal, water and other objects are good conductors  and they seem to be cold just because they are quickly conducting heat away from your skin. 

The problem with my theory is that bread is so porous that it shouldn't be a good conductor of heat.  I wouldn't think evaporation would be a strong factor, but it might be.  Oh well...as Forest Gump says, "That's all I've got to say about that." :)

FF

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== Objects at room temperature often feel cold when you touch them since your body temp is so much higher than room temperature. ===

The thing is though that sourdough slices generally feel cool, particuarly on the back of the hand, while those made with bakers yeast do not.    I've noted this with many different sourdough recipes too.  I wonder if the acid level in the bread is just right to tickle the "coolness sensor" on your skin.

sPh

mwilson's picture
mwilson

You had the answer and then you turned away from it!

The water.

I've found bread made with a higher hydration are colder to the touch for reasons you mentioned. In this case the denser nature of sourdough will enhance this perception.

Ford's picture
Ford

I can think of no better answer than a higher percentage of water in the loaf than usual.

Ford