The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Potato Hot Dog Bun

BakerNewbie's picture
BakerNewbie

Potato Hot Dog Bun

We're trying to start a hot dog business and don't have access to the "popular" hot dog buns in the US. We do have access to a professional baker and equipment -- and want to produce our own hot dog buns. We've found a few "pototo hot dog bun" recipes online, but would prefer to get a recipe from someone in this forum as the members here REALLY seem to understand bread.

We're thinking we should make potato buns so we have something unique. However, we don't need to use potato buns. It can be something else. The goal is to come up with something better than what can be bought at the grocery stores. We are tying to offer a gourmet experience and strongly believe that the bun will have a significant impact to that experience.

Suggestions? Thanks!

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

posted here by sylviah.  They are very easy to make, and quick too, which may be an advantage for you.  I make them for hamburgers, hot dogs, and I also wrap hot dogs in the unbaked dough, then proof and bake them together, for what my mother called "Pigs in Blankets", although I have since learned that the moniker is more commonly used in reference to link sausage rolled up in pancakes as a breakfast treat.  In any case I have made these rolls for a couple of years now, with plain old russet potatoes, Yukon Gold potatoes, sweet potatoes, and even yams.  The potato makes these moist, tender, and with a firm "tooth" that I much love.  Then again, I must admit, I'm a sucker for potato bread in any form.

Good luck with your venture.  Perhaps these, or a variation on these, has a future in your future.
OldWoodenSpoon

BakerNewbie's picture
BakerNewbie

Thanks OldWoodenSpoon. How do these compare to the ones you can buy at the grocery stores? Also, have you ever had those steamed hot dog buns (like those popular ones in Chicago, NY, etc.)? Would these hold up well under some light steaming?

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

but it has to depend on what you want.  I'm no great fan of the common grocery store hot dog bun because there is nothing to those soft, crustless bun-things.  I like these because they have some substance, and they are an addition to the hot dog itself rather than just a wrapper to hold the mustard, etc.  THey contribute flavor as well as texture.  Since they do have some substance they would hold up to light steaming very well I think.  Based on all the recipes you are turning up in this thread you'll be busy testing that on several options I'm sure.  If you need help with those hot dogs just send them along. :)

Good luck in your venture.  Every time I find a good hot dog store in my area it goes broke.  I can't keep them in business all by myself, despite my best efforts.
OldWoodenSpoon

yy's picture
yy

I don't know of a commercial-scale formula for hot dog buns, but I'm partial to the New England hot dog roll (photo below taken from http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/lobster-salad-rolls-with-shaved-fennel-citrus-10000001995696/):

the dough itself is fluffy, soft and slightly enriched, like any hot dog bun, but the defining characteristic is the flat, "exposed" sides that can be buttered and toasted until crisp and golden. In my opinion, the toasting really adds flavor and makes the bread itself part of the main event instead of being an incidental blank canvas for whatever filling is inside. I've had a hard time finding them in regular grocery stores, even though I technically live in New England. Below is a link to my blog post about making New England hot dog buns:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23438/new-england-style-hot-dog-buns

As you can see, there is a special type of pan you can use to make them, but it's definitely not necessary. From what I've seen, most restaurants just use sheet pans and space the individually shaped buns very close together so that they rise into one another. Whatever the final formula of your dough (potato bread, brioche, or other), this form of bun will certainly add flavor and uniqueness. 

 

BakerNewbie's picture
BakerNewbie

Hi yy, thanks for the link. I was already looking at this recipe of yours before I posted my question here. This is definitely something to try! Thanks!

sphealey's picture
sphealey

This recipe from Rose Levy is excellent:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2008/07/golden_burger_buns.html

[note that "yam" refers to an American sweet potato, not African yam] 

Scaling up to production quantity left as an exercise to the reader (!), but may of Rose's formulas are used by professional bakeries.

sPh

BakerNewbie's picture
BakerNewbie

Thanks sPh. Have you ever tried using potato flakes (the ones for instant mashed potatoes)?

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== Have you ever tried using potato flakes (the ones for instant mashed potatoes)? ===

No, I have always used whole potatoes for recipes like this.  Used to use potato flour in some recipes [1] but that's different from whole potato (5% potato flour will make the dough smoother).

sPh

[1] I can't find any potato flour without a nut warning anymore.

BakerNewbie's picture
BakerNewbie

My concern with using potato or yam is that is varies from region to region. I may not have access to the right varieties. Will have to experiment, I guess.

With regards to the 5% potato flour, does that mean that 5% regular flour is subtracted? Meaning: 95% regular flour and 5% potato flour? Or do you mean 100% regular flour and 5% potato flour? 

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

I'm not a fan of Levy, in general, so I've not tried her yam buns. But I have used our own Floyd's recipe for sweet potato rolls, and made it into both hamburger and hot dog buns. They bring their own interest to the sandwich, which is more than I would ever say about supermarket buns. It might be too much trouble to make them on an commercial scale, but it would certainly distinguish you in the marketplace.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4862/sweet-potato-rolls

I also love the grilled buns as mentioned by yy, but would not say they were regionalized to New England. I used to get them regularly in the U.S. midwest way back when.

Both Bob's Red Mill and King Arthur sell potato flour. If I was baking buns for a commercial venture, I'd use the flour and let them deal with the potatoes. 

jaywillie