The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Need help figuring out what i'm doing!

  • Pin It
berty's picture
berty

Need help figuring out what i'm doing!

Hello.  i'm currentley working on a loaf but not really sure what it would be clasified as or where i can really take it.  Its a 100% white loaf, with the addition of olive oil, malt extract and fresh yeast.  The crumb is amazingly open, i mean you could litterly take a bite without tasting any bread..... and its soft, slightly chewy and packs bags of flavour. The crust, when out of the oven is like crisp filo pasrty but when cold it softens up. Lasts for absolutely ages but the problem is its ugly and because of the open crumb it lacks to struckure to hold itself up...infact i stacked a couple on top of eachother and ended up with a flat bread.  Its impossible to shape so after 5 gentle kneads over 30 minute intervals i pour it onto the table, shape it and gently fold it twice and leave it covered on an oiled tray overnight in the fridge.  I bake it 250 degrees C for about 15o minutes...it balloons in the oven but flattens like a souffle after a while.

Any body got any ideas on how to shape it...and is this recipe sort of like a foccacia?

 

1500g water

780g 100% hydration - extremley active and warm

2980 - strong white bread flour

42g fresh yeast

120g olive oil

18g salt

25g malt extract

berty's picture
berty

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

sourdough starter?    I figure 57% total hydration with bread flour...  doesn't add up to pouring.  Sounds like you baked a bulk rise.  Got any more information like dough temps?

berty's picture
berty

780g of sourdough starter yep

berty's picture
berty

more like a semi set jelly

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

at the 30 minute intervals?   Did it rise much between your 30 min handling?

That's a lot of dough almost 5 kg! Did you get the feeling you should have degassed it before baking?  Like with all ten fingertips making dents all over the dough?  This works real well for focaccia.

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

Mini is technically correct at 57%.  Even if you include the olive oil as liquid, you would be at 60%, rather stiff.  Your olive oil is about 2.25% of total. 

1) so hydration is stiff, yet you say pour

2) 250 c is hot (482°) - crust should be crisp and crunchy at that temp

3) 150 minutes?  baguettes should take 15-20 minutes at this temp and loaves 40-50.

4) Unless I'm missing something you are making 11 pounds of dough - how many loaves are you making out of this?

Surely you jest....

berty's picture
berty

haha no im serious.. i make 4 large slabs, around A4 size each.  I see what you mean, it should be quite stiff but its very loose. No possible to score either. Its active between kneads. Id say it doubles in 3 hours. 30 minutes autolyse - in which it almost doubles to begin with, and gets back up after every knead. Initially i knocked the dough back and shaped on a heavily flooured surface. but the gasses didnt come back.  I was left with a very heavy dense crumb.  So now i try to reserve as much of the initial gasses by portioning and shaping a much as i can gently. not very effective on a commercial basis but really is good to eat. 

berty's picture
berty

wait sorry..did i say 2980g? i meant 1980g..and not 150 minutes......more like 15!   sorry :(

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Lots of info to be found under: handling wet doughs,   folding,  S & F  or stretch and fold  or slap and fold (two different methods)  and high hydration dough      just to name a few...  Use the site search box, upper left corner of the page.  Also YouTube videos.   :)

I can't tell much from the photos... got a cross section cut shot?  or a discription?   NT?

vtsteve's picture
vtsteve

You've got around 0.75% salt (vs. 1.8% typically). Are you trying for a low-salt formula? More salt would strengthen the dough. Baking longer, with the door cracked open after the initial 15 minutes, would help preserve the crispness and overall shape. If you don't want the crust any darker, turn down the oven, or just turn it off and leave the bread in for an extra 10 minutes to dry it out.