The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Guinness Sourdough

AC56's picture
AC56

Guinness Sourdough

Hello,

I've been experimenting with beer sourdough in preparation for St. Patrick's day.  Made a batch of Guinness extra stout sourdough yesterday and will try to attach a couple of photos at the end of this message.  Essentially I substituted Guinness for water in my sourdough recipe.  Initially it was coming out too heavy, but with a new starter that problem disappeared.  The next challenge is to get some green color into the loaf.

The plan is to make two batches:  one with Guinness, the other with water and food color.  After kneading them both I'll roll them flat, lay them together, then roll the two together.  The hope is that each piece of bread will have a spiral pattern of the green dough between the darker Guinness dough.

I'm looking for ideas on how to make the loaves have  the spiral pattern in the desired direction.  I can't picture how I'm going to take the final dough, let it rise, then cut it into four loaves, rise again in pans, and still come out with the spiral in each piece of bread.

Any ideas?

Thanks, Marc

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the gods created Guinness is so that the Irish do not take over the world :-)  Guinness bread is an Irish staple and green is their color.  I don't see why they can't be mixed?  I would put some dark brown food color in the Guinness one though to make it much darker to really pop off the green.  I have been thinking about this too - being as Irish from Cork as one can be - at least one who wasn't born there.  So, it's Bemish for me!!!

I thought about rolling the colored doughs into equal sized squares or rectangles.  Then cutting each diagonally from one corner to another and swapping one side with the other and piece it back together so each square now has both colors.  Then I want to cut this new square from corner to the opposite corner again (perpendicular to the seam) making 2 triangles out of each......then roll each triangle up, starting from the wide side like a huge croissant shape or rugelach.   By pulling the points toward each other you would make a shape of a lute which would be very Celtic indeed.   You could also swap 2 quraters to make an even greater variety of color in each loaf. 

The shapes of loaves, the colors they would have and easily display - would make a very nice St. Paddy's day treat.   

AC56's picture
AC56

I can't imagine what your suggestion might look like.  I'll be lucky to get spirals out of mine.  Why not bake some and show us your photos?

I have to make this right.  It's for a local Irish restaurant on St. Patrick's day.

A few years ago my wife and I spent some time on the coast of Ireland, west of Dublin.  Being a porter brewer I wanted to experience Guinness first-hand.  We visited a local bar both for the beer and music.  After a few glasses of Guinness I noticed that all of the locals at the bar were drinking Miller Lite.  I couldn't resist the temptation, approached the bar with an expression of disappointment and announced "you call yourselves Irish and drink Miller Lite.  You have the best beer in the world".  They all broke out in laughter.

Marc

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in front of many of my Irish friends in Dublin - and thank goodness they were old frinds too. 

I said 'for a bunch if Irish blokes I'm most surprised that not a one of you knows what Guinness really is - not a one of ya''  a laugh went up and many said it's the best beer in the world or some such thing. I told them 'no, that is not what Guinness is at all and I am ashamed of my Irish friends.'  Well you smart alec American, who wouldn't know Guinness from Miller Lite - what is it then, tell me boy?  came the reply. 

I calmly said that 'this finest of elixirs, known as Guinness, is nothing more than the sweat off of God's  b*lls and he is obviously a very large black man not to be trifled with.'

For a homogeneous society well known for its lack of racial and religious intolerance, especially by the men, no smiles were to be seen or laughter heard until I cracked one and started laughing and said 'got you boy's real good I did, you'll not be forgetting that joke any time soon - next round's on me!!!

I will take up the St Paddy's day multi colored rugelach challenge and see how it turns out.   I will send photos of them to these same friends in Ireland and SKYPE them too - as always on St. Paddy's day.

They are correct about the color green in baked goods.  You really have to load it up for it to shine through.  I would think it would have to be soda bread to be authentic Irish right?  But, that would be real tough to roll and, if you rolled it, it would be too tough to eat :-)

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I had a rather religious uncle who was a cook and baker. When he tried to make green bread he achieved the exact color of moldy bread! He should have used a LOT more colorant.It was rather unappetizing but not as unappetizing as when he colored the mashed potatoes lavender during Lent!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

your SD guinness recipe?  I would like to try it.   I think it could be made brown and green from the looks of it and that save some bake time for sure. The light tan color might make the green look a little strange though.

AC56's picture
AC56

The recipe is essentially the same as the following provided by King Arthur Flour:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/extra-tangy-sourdough-bread-recipe

I substituted the 1 1/2 Cups of water with 1 bottle (1 1/2 Cups) of Guinness.  I had warmed and degased the beer the day before.

Today I did my green color test.  I'll attach a photo of the batch of sourdough made today with 3/4 tsp. of green color.  After others' comments on the amount of green I thought I'd better experiment.  What do you think?  Is it green enough?  It will be layered between Guinness layers with the color of the bread in the first message in this series.  Others have suggested that maybe I should make my Guinness bread browner.  In the next couple of days I'll try making my first batch of Guinness/green sourdough, and will take photos.

More to come.

Marc

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The green turned out great don't you think?  St Paddy's day will be festive - breadwise.

sonia101's picture
sonia101

WOW that's fantastic!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Octopus ink and yellow food color would bring a deep mossy green.  Might also try a darker flour.

With many pigments, black and yellow make green.  Try blending first in tiny amounts before adding to anything.  If squash makes a yellow bread then a natural green might be achieved with adding animal ink.  (or a small amount of blue dye) 

 

AC56's picture
AC56

I like the green, but would like to darken the color of my Guinness bread.  Octopus ink is an interesting option, as suggested above, but I'm beyond my diving years.  I'll stick with artificial food color for the green, but the brown of the Guinness batch should be darkened and I found an option that may do the job naturally.  I just ordered some King Arthur Irish-Style Wholemeal Flour.  It's darker and "Irish".  I'd better ask a couple of questions before I mess this up totally.

I've read that I should stick to no more than 50% whole wheat when making sourdough.  Any comments?  And should I worry about problems with the rise of the inter-rolled batches when they have different components?  One with and one without whole wheat flour.

Thanks, Marc

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that making brown is pretty easy with food color.  Mix all the colors together and you get brown like we did as kids when coloring easter eggs and got down to the last ones.  Dabrownman should know about all things brown :-)