The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking 13th to 20th February 2012

ananda's picture
ananda

Baking 13th to 20th February 2012

A holiday week for Alison; a week of baking for me, plus a trip to Oxford to meet up with fellow UK TFL members and enjoy real quality time.

Here is the baking side of things:

Firstly I made Borodinsky on Wednesday 15th Feb, as my "show and tell" loaf for the UK meet.   My project is to turn this and other high rye loaves into 100% rye and eliminate the wheat portion.   Alison is avoiding wheat, and I am aware that there are numerous customers out there with similar aspirations.   To do this I need to source bulk quantities of light rye.   No changes made at this stage to the current formula.

Thursday 16th Feb was a much bigger baking day.   I began with a new rye formula; Moscow Rye.   This uses caraway seeds along with red rye malt.   It is all rye!   I used only the Bacheldre Dark Rye, and I also used a soaker plus the sponge to adopt the full 3 stage process.

Moscow Rye 15 – 16.02.2012

Rye Sour build:

Day/Time

Stock

D Rye

Water

TOTAL

Monday 09:30

40

300

500

840

Monday 15:30

840

300

500

1640

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

600

Water

50

1000

TOTAL

80

1600

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

13

260

Red Rye Malt

7

140

Blackstrap Molasses

1

20

Caraway Seeds

0.1

2

Boiling Water

35

700

TOTAL

56.1

1122

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

1600

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

1122

TOTAL

142

2722

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

2840

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

50

1000

Salt

1.2

24

Fresh Yeast

0.2

4

Water

11

220

TOTAL

204.4

4088

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

96

-

% wholegrain flour

75

-

FACTOR

10

-

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   combine the caraway and the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 6 hours.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Add water if needed [I added 220g which is 11% on flour].   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 28°C.
  • Shape into a large Pullman Pan, plus a large and small bread pan prepared with lining of butter and coating of rye flour.
  • Final proof for just 1 hour at 28°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pan, apply steam, and turn the oven down to 100°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 6 hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread

I baked everything else in the wood-fired oven, as follows:

Gilchesters’ Miche/Boules 15 - 16.02.2012

Makes 2 Miches, 1 large and 2 small Boules

Levain build:

Day

Time

Stock Levain

Strong White Flour

Water

TOTAL

Wednesday

13:00

40g

100g

60g

200g

Wednesday

16:00

200g

300g

180g

680g

Wednesday

19:00

680g

400g

240g

1320g

 

 

 

 

 

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

700

Water

15

420

TOTAL

40

1120

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

40

1120

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

75

2100

Salt

1.8

50

Water

58

1624

TOTAL

174.8

4894

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

73

-

% wholegrain flour [approx 85% extraction]

75

-

FACTOR

28

-

        

 

Method:

  • Build the levain, see description above.
  • For mixing, first of all mix on first speed for 3 minutes with a hook attachment, then autolyse the Gilchesters flour with the water only for 1 hour.
  • Add the levain and the salt.   Mix on first speed only for 10 minutes.   Dough Temperature 26°C.
  • Retard overnight.
  • Bulk prove the dough allowing recovery to ambient; approx. 2 hours.  
  • Scale and divide as above.   Mould round and rest for 15 minutes.   Prepare bannetons, re-mould dough pieces and set to final proof.
  • Final proof DDT maintained at 26°C, for 3 hours.
  • Tip each loaf out of the banneton onto a peel, score the top and set to bake on the sole of the wood-fired oven.   Small loaves bake in half an hour, next biggest takes 40 minutes and the biggest loaf took around 50 minutes.
  • Cool on wires.

White Bread

This bread turned out with a lovely cracked crust; I made 1 large and 2 small loaves.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Sponge

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

300

Fresh Yeast

0.1

1.2

Water

15

180

TOTAL

40.1

481.2

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Sponge [from 1 above]

40.1

481.2

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

45

540

Gilchesters’ Organic Pizza/Ciabatta Flour

30

360

Salt

1.4

16.8

Fresh Yeast

2

24

Water

50

600

TOTAL

168.5

2022

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

65

-

FACTOR

12

-

The sponge was fermented overnight; the Gilchesters' flour produces distinctly "off-white" bread, but these looked attractive once baked.

Wholemeal Bloomers

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Sponge

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

625

Fresh Yeast

0.1

2.5

Water

15

375

TOTAL

40.1

1002.5

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Sponge [from 1 above]

40.1

1002.5

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

75

1875

Salt

1.5

37.5

Fresh Yeast

2

50

Water

54

1350

TOTAL

172.6

4315

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

69

-

% wholegrain

75

-

FACTOR

25

-

 

I made these as 4 large bloomers, baked on the sole of the oven.   The spring in the oven was really pleasing, producing a very light bread for a 75% wholemeal loaf.

 

Croissant etc. with Sponge

My base recipe for laminated yeasted dough   And I have adapted the formula to use a sponge where 20% of the total flour becomes pre-fermented.   I’m still to be convinced on the sponge, as I believe it makes the laminating process somewhat more difficult; the jury is out on this!

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Sponge

 

 

Marriage’s Strong Organic White Flour

20

200

Fresh Yeast

0.1

1

Water

12

120

TOTAL

32.1

321

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Sponge [from 1 above]

32.1

321

Marriage’s Strong Organic White Flour

80

800

Salt

1.3

13

Milk Powder

5

50

Fresh Yeast

4

40

Water

51

510

TOTAL

173.4

1734

 

 

 

3. Laminating Process

 

 

Final Dough above

173.4

1734

Butter – lightly salted

42

420

TOTAL

215.4

2154

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

63

-

FACTOR

1 0

-

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the night before and leave to ferment slowly.
  • For the dough, blend the milk powder and salt through the flour.   Weigh very cold [I pre-chill the water overnight] water into the mixing bowl, and dissolve the fresh yeast into this.   Add the sponge and the dry ingredients.   Mix with a hook attachment for 3 minutes on slow and 4 minutes on second speed, scraping down the bowl as necessary.
  • Cover the dough and store in the chiller for half an hour, and meanwhile cut the butter into slices and roll between 2 plastic bags to create a pliable sheet of butter.
  • Roll out the croissant dough so that the slab of butter fits onto two thirds of the dough slab.   Fold the butter in letter-style to create 2 layers of butter.   Rest for one hour in the chiller.
  • Turn through 90° and roll out to the same size as before.   Fold the dough in 3 for the first turn, then chill a further hour.   Repeat this 3 more times to give 4 x ½ turns in total.   Rest a further one hour
  • I then split the dough into 3 sections and made 14 Pain au Chocolats, 12 Pain Amandes and 14 Croissants.
  • Glaze each finished unit with egg, dip the Pain Amande in flaked almonds and set to proof for 45 minutes.
  • I used the electric oven to bake these on convection heat setting at 210°C for approx 15 minutes each tray.
  • Cool on wires

Bara Brith [Speckled Bread, or, Welsh Tea Bread]

Material

Formula [%]

Notes

Recipe [grams]

1. Fruit Soaker

 

 

 

Figs

7

 

70

Raisins

20

 

200

Mixed Peel

20

 

200

Strong Tea

38

Cover fruit with tea

380

TOTAL

85 [47 + 13 + 25]

Strain off residual liquor 25. Fruit 13

850 [470 + 130 + 250]

 

 

 

 

2. Pre-ferment

 

 

 

Strong White Flour

20

 

200

Caster Sugar

5

 

50

Fresh Yeast

5

 

50

Water @ 38°C

35

Not tea

350

TOTAL

65

 

650

 

 

 

 

3. Final Dough

 

 

 

Ferment [from above]

65

 

650

Wholemeal

40

 

400

Strong White Flour

40

 

400

Salt

1

 

10

Mixed Spice

1

 

10

Milk Powder

7

 

70

Butter

18

 

180

Sugar

10

 

100

Tea [from soaked fruit]

25

As required

250

SUB TOTAL

182

 

1820

Soaked fruit [from above]

60 [47 + 13]

 

600

TOTAL

242

 

2420

 

Method:

  • Soak the fruit overnight in freshly brewed boiling hot strong tea.   The liquor should just cover the fruit.
  • Drain off the liquor from the fruit and reserve both parts
  • Make the ferment and leave, covered in a warm place for 40 minutes
  • Cut the butter into small cubes, combine flour, mp, salt, spice and sugar.   Add the ferment and mix in a machine with hook or paddle beater to form a soft and well-developed dough.   Add the reserved tea liquor as needed to let the dough down.
  • Ferment for half an hour covered.
  • Cut the soaked fruit into the dough
  • Rest 20 minutes, then process.   I made 3 large round loaves, Panettone-style, scaled around 800g each.
  • These were baked slowly in the wood-fired oven.

The breakfast pastries went in the freezer, except a few left as a gift for my Sister-in-Law and Niece who came to look after our cat for the weekend!   One Bara Brith for Mark, "mine host" at the Bear and Ragged Staff in Oxford.   That apart, all the rest of these breads were sold on day of production, even though I only had orders for 7 loaves; the rest went too.

Today's baking made it to the freezer, ready for the Farmers' Market coming up on Friday.   I made the following:

 Breads for Monday 20th February 2012

Rye Sour built with 40g stock, plus 300g Dark Rye and 500g water, fermented overnight.   Wheat Levain built with 40g stock plus 600g white flour and 360g water, fermented overinight.   The Biga was also fermented overnight.

Ciabatta Dough

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Biga

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

30

1080

Water

18

648

Fresh Yeast

0.28

8

TOTAL

48.28

1738

 

 

 

1b. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

3

108

Water

5

180

TOTAL

8

288

 

 

 

2a. Final Dough – “Bassinage”

 

 

Biga – from 1a above]

48.28

1738

Rye Sourdough – from 1b above]

8

288

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

40

1440

Gilchesters’ Organic Ciabatta Flour

21

757

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

3

108

Gilchesters’ Organic Coarse Semolina

3

108

Salt

1.78

64

Fresh Yeast

2.72

100

Water

43

1548

TOTAL

170.78

6148

 

 

 

2b Final Dough – super-hydration

 

 

Final Dough – “Bassinage”

170.78

6148

Water

19

684

TOTAL

189.78

6832

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

33

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% “wholegrain”

9

-

FACTOR

36

-

 

I made 15 x 250g Ciabatta breads, plus 3 x 900g sheets of Foccacia [Red Onion and Feta; Olive and Feta; Rosemary and Rock Salt]

Pain de Campagne with Mixed Leavens

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

600

Water

12

360

TOTAL

32

960

 

 

 

1b Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

6

180

Water

10

300

TOTAL

16

480

 

 

 

2 Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a above]

32

960

Rye Sourdough [from 1b above]

16

480

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

600

T55 French Flour

30

900

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

24

720

Salt

1.5

45

Water

47

1410

TOTAL

170.5

5115

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

26

-

% overall hydration

69

-

% wholegrain

30

-

FACTOR

30

-

 

I made 2 Miches plus 1 large and 3 small Boules.

 

My brother and sister-in-law sent me 5kg of T55 flour as a birthday present recently.    They have been staying in the Dordogne for most of January, and eventually he came across this flour which he was confident would be good for me to work with.

 

I’m going to use up the other 4kg on Thursday!

 

Some business on the baking front, with lots of ideas about how to take “Bread and Roses” forward too.   The studying needs more priority, of course.   ‘Twas ever thus!

 

Happy Baking Everybody!

Andy

Comments

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Ok ... wow ... !!

I had to read it a few times ... there is so much quality information and insights into a busy days of baking. I love the sound of the ciabatta with a touch of rye sour .. very nice ... but I think i'll have a Gilchester Miche and a Bara Birth thanks ...

So your retarding in bulk the naturally leveaned breads and mixing/baking the yeasted breads on the same day?

You are certainly getting your moneys worth from your mixer. So what are you finding the trickiest part of planning and executing these types of bakes?

Hope you have a great day at the market ... your products looks great!

Cheers,
Phil

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Phil,

Whether I overnight retard or not depends on my schedules, and leaven availability.   The Pain au Levain I made using a long ferment period for the leaven to ripen, as I was low on stock when we got back from the TFL meet late on Sunday afternoon and I was desperate to bake on Monday to get stocks built up in the freezer.   The Gilchesters' Miche works well either on retard system, or taken after a couple of hours bulk time for shaping and final proof.

Yes, I decided Ciabatta is great with rye sour...but agreed, just a tad.   The semolina was an inpired addition too!

Many thanks for your ever-generous words

Very best wishes

Andy

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Outstanding work. Very impressive. Making me hungry! I'll take a Gilchesters’ Boule please.

Really wonderful baking and post Andy.

Michael

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Michael,

Very good to hear from you and I appreciate your generous comments

All good wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

like I've stumbled into a bakery but darn, can't buy anything.  I scoured through your post to find out what was the picture at the top right.   Welsh tea bread it seems.   So tempting.   I've never had such a thing.    Your quantity seems to be going up.   Quality goes without saying.   Happy baking indeed.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

Well this is my bakery for now; a shame I can only share it with you over the internet, but I really do appreciate all your comments.

Bara Brith ordinarily baked in a small loaf pan, and should be made mainly with currants.   My variations seemed popular enough anyway.

Very best wishes

Andy

Syd's picture
Syd

Outstanding baking Andy!  And so thoroughly documented, too.  It is all good, but if I had to choose which ones I wanted to eat, I would go for the Moscow Rye and the Bara Brith because I have never tasted either of those. Very well done.

Best,

Syd

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Syd,

Very good to hear from you.   I suspect the Moscow rye will become popular, as the recipe is made only with rye.   I am finding quite a few customers who have to keep wheat out of their diet.   When they discover my rye breads they are always so appreciative.   Being forcibly deprived of eating bread, as we know it, must be quite depressing.

The Bara Brith is a winner; I like making it with the wholemeal portion of flour too!

All good wishes

Andy

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Very smart!!  I love th picture of all the ciabattas (?) lined up waiting to go <grin>

After the weekend, we are both sold on rye - so I need to try this out / learn more!

DD2 home next weekend from a few months in China - need to produce pizza - off to source recipes..

Thanks again for this - lots to play with!!
Hope all goes well - hugs to Alison

S

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Sali,

lovely to hear from you.

Yes, the UK TFL get-together did off lots of great rye breads, so it's good to know you picked up the taste.

For pizza dough I would recommend you use the same formula as my ciabatta recipe below, but cut total hydration back to 75%.

Great combination of baking: rye bread and pizzas....wood-fired oven per chance?

All good wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I'll take just one of each except for the rest of them.  For those - I'll take two.   Nice week of baking Andy!  Sell them fast so you can bake some more. 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi dabrownman,

I'll be hoping to make plenty more bread tomorrow then; still hoping to sell out, of course

Best wishes

Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Andy,
Your lucky customers will be enjoying so many good things!
The Bara Brith is very beautiful, baked in panettone molds.
And a very happy belated birthday wish - and hope you enjoy baking with the French T55 flour - what a lovely gift!
:^) breadsong

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you for your good wishes Breadsong,

I have more Bara Brith to make tomorrow; a repeat order with "to die for" as the feedback.   I'm going to set up a "Poolish" in readiness, but have yet to decide on the T55.   I'm tempted to do Baguettes Traditionale and use my bannetons for other breads.

Very best wishes

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

lovely collection of breads, Andy!

You are a true baker at heart, Andy. Looks like the pain de campaign is a popular recipe with your clients.

thanks for the inspiration.

ananda's picture
ananda

That's a much appreciated comment Khalid, thank you.

Actually it's the Gilchesters and the Rye breads that I find to be most popular, but any of the Pain de Campagne/Pain au Levain/Pain de Siegle are always popular too.   The lines which have something distinct or unique usually attract most interest.

All good wishes

Andy

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

What a beautiful and interesting collection of breads!  I'm especially intrigued by your stiff sponge for the croissants.  Must go bake now, you've filled me with inspiration.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello FlourChild,

Thank you for your kind comments.

Actually I'm not sure about a pre-ferment in the croissant dough.   I was talking to a baking colleague recently who used to own a croissant bakery.   He wondered if the dough might be too extensible as a result of using the sponge.   I was really struggling to get the butter to laminate.   I've done croissants twice only with the pre-ferment, and had the same problem both times!   So do let us know if you try this and have more success...good luck!

Best wishes

Andy