The Fresh Loaf

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Hobart HL600 60 quart mixer

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t-man's picture
t-man

Hobart HL600 60 quart mixer

hi all... i'm about to purchase a hobart HL600 60 quart mixer for a small pizza/bakery business. the mixer i'm looking at is listed as 200-240/50/60/3/1.  i called the hobart dealer for advice and they told me that this is a dual phase mixer, and it can be used on either single or three phase power with just some simple re-wiring.  i want to make sure this is possible (the guy that told me has not seen the mixer).  he just said based on the numbers i gave him it "sounds like i could use it anywhere".  can anyone assure me that a 200-240V will work in any area of town?  i'm in the USA.  i thought everything was 120v here, but maybe not?  the spec sheet from the hobart website lists the mixer as  200-240/50/60/3/1.  i just want to be sure that i am able to use the mixer at any location.  currently it's being used at a school and i think it is wired for three phase power.   can anyone verify that this is, in fact, dual phase and that i can use it on single or 3 phase power?  i just want to be sure before i spend the money, and i've had a hard time finding helpful info on the internet searches.  thanks for any help you can provide!  any and all insights welcome!

AlanTheBreadGuy's picture
AlanTheBreadGuy

Call a local electrician that you know/trust - who will probably be installing the wiring for the mixer - to confirm what you suspect about its suitability.  They should be able to tell you if it's a good buy, or not.  Good luck and keep us posted.

t-man's picture
t-man

thanks for the advice.  i will do so tomorrow...

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

as the Hobart man says.  I'm guessing you can wire it 2 ways (very common)-  single or 3 phase (depending on what kind of 24 power you have, and it can handle power variations of your locality from a low of 200 to 240 V and 50 to 60 cycles without harming the motor.  Still, any electrician can wire it for you once you know what kind of 240 V you have coming into your building - single or 3 phase.  It looks like the Hobart can handle both which would make sense.

240 V is just about every where in the USA.  Most all washers, dryers, A/C heaters and ranges are 240 V in residential and industrial buildings al almost all 240V or 208V.  Industrial fluorescent lights are 277 V.   

t-man's picture
t-man

well, thanks.  i'm becoming more comfortable with the mixer purchase... i just didn't want to limit myself to certain areas of town or particular buildings if the mixer was, in fact, 3 phase only.  because of the 3,1 tacked onto the end of the motor description on the hobart spec. sheet, it's looking like it's definitley a dual phase.  i appreciate your help, and glad to know that the 200-240 will work, too.  here is a link to the spec sheet:  https://my.hobartcorp.com/resourcecenter/ProductDocumentation/F40009.pdf

according to the spec sheet it looks like it also comes in a 380-460/50/60/3, as well, although this is not written on the mixer that i'm looking at.  i'm assuming it's a larger motor that is 3 phase only?  can you advise on this one as well?  as long as i've got your attention, i'd like to know for future reference, as i hope to be in business a long time!  just want to educate myself as well as i can on this stuff.  thanks again.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

460 V motors are 3 phase.  I always put 460 in my industrial buildings because the amps are lower, the cost of wiring and breakers is less and  the electrical bills lower.  Plus you can always step down 460 v to 240 v  with a transformer.  In your case, if the building only has 460 v 3 phase you can get a transformer and step it down for your 240 v Hobart.  If the building is 208 V single phase, the Hobart can be wired to handle that too and if the building is  240 v 3 phase the Hobart can be wired for that as well.  The Hobart you are looking at buying has the most electrical flexibility - which is why it is the most popular model.  Hobart also likes it the best becasue they don't have to make a bunch of different models for specific electrical requirements and customers like you really like it because it is so flexible from an electrical wiring point of view.

t-man's picture
t-man

i was surprised that i couldn't easily find this info by simply googling.  this is an extremely helpful and informative thread... thanks, again. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is much more of an unknown black art than bread making ever was :-)

t-man's picture
t-man

i am in agreement... as luck would have it, i've got a line on another mixer for use as a back up.  this time an older 30 quart hobart that i KNOW is a 3 phase.  do you have any experience with phase converters and how this 30 quart 3 phase hobart might respond to converting it to single phase?  is there any sacrifice in power?  longevity of motor?  anything i should be concerned about if i do convert it to single?

AlanTheBreadGuy's picture
AlanTheBreadGuy

I have a phase converter on my 80 qt Hobart.  It is about 30 years old.  It only experiences a loss of power when I'm trying to whip 75 pounds of dough on speed 3 (don't ask).  In other words, I have had no problems with my mixer being on a phase converter.  Double check with your electrician just to be sure.