The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hobart HL600 60 quart mixer

t-man's picture
t-man

Hobart HL600 60 quart mixer

hi all... i'm about to purchase a hobart HL600 60 quart mixer for a small pizza/bakery business. the mixer i'm looking at is listed as 200-240/50/60/3/1.  i called the hobart dealer for advice and they told me that this is a dual phase mixer, and it can be used on either single or three phase power with just some simple re-wiring.  i want to make sure this is possible (the guy that told me has not seen the mixer).  he just said based on the numbers i gave him it "sounds like i could use it anywhere".  can anyone assure me that a 200-240V will work in any area of town?  i'm in the USA.  i thought everything was 120v here, but maybe not?  the spec sheet from the hobart website lists the mixer as  200-240/50/60/3/1.  i just want to be sure that i am able to use the mixer at any location.  currently it's being used at a school and i think it is wired for three phase power.   can anyone verify that this is, in fact, dual phase and that i can use it on single or 3 phase power?  i just want to be sure before i spend the money, and i've had a hard time finding helpful info on the internet searches.  thanks for any help you can provide!  any and all insights welcome!

dwcoleman's picture
dwcoleman

Most homes/commercial space in North America have 240V single phase.  It's possible to convert some things from 240V to 120V and vice versa(normally motors).  You would only do this for items that draw lower amounts of power, feasible for a mixer.  I wouldn't rewire the mixer to 120V, it will work harder/hotter.

Now single phase vs 3 phase would be the problem.  The mixer is probably 3 phase, it allows the motor to be smaller and more powerful.  It's possible to purchase hardware to convert, but I wouldn't.  Look for a location that has 3 phase power.

t-man's picture
t-man

thanks for your response... the following info was on the serial number tag:  200-240/50/60/3,1.  i'm wondering if the "3,1" might might mean that it can be used on either single or 3 phase, assuming it's wired properly.  any thoughts? 

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

In the US, if you have 3-phase power it is probably 208v/60Hz and would be present along with three 120v/60Hz single phase lines from the same transformer (with 120° of phase difference between the 120v lines which produces the 208v).  If you have 240v/60Hz, it is single phase (really 2-phase but they are 180° apart generally with a neutral).  Take off the plate where the power comes into the mixer and see what the terminals are labeled.  If it can be done, there should be a wiring diagram on the inside of the plate or somewhere close by telling you how to wire it up depending on what kind of power you have.  You will probably need what is called a 4-wire/60a/240v circuit with two 120v lines, a neutral, and a ground.  Probably all #8 solid copper wire on a dedicated circuit with a 2-phase circuit breaker.  If you have 3-phase power, it is important that you get the phases connected correctly so that the motor runs in the right direction.  Definitely a job for a licensed electrician.

 

t-man's picture
t-man

thanks so much for the informative reply.  very much appreciated.

mcs's picture
mcs

You are correct, the 3/1 signifies 3 or single phase usage.  If it's currently being used 3 phase, then an electrician can easily convert it to single.  If it's being used as a single phase, then it'll be even more simple since it'll be using about the same voltage as an electric water heater.

t-man's picture
t-man

thank you all for your responses... you've provided some relief to an apprehensive first time mixer buyer (a very costly mixer!) and a first time small business owner.  much appreciated.

johnr55's picture
johnr55

I'm a retired radiographer.  Most of the old x-ray equipment in this country was 220V single phase, now most of it is 480V three phase.  I'll echo was the poster said earlier-you have to get an electrician out to check the 'legs' on the three phase, since there's 'A, B, C', with different phase combinations.  You can really, really mess up a motor having it phased the wrong way.  Because three phase electricity has a much more efficient wave sequence, it's also more efficient in its use of power.