The Fresh Loaf

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Any low wheat /gluten type of recipes

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Farzana's picture
Farzana

Any low wheat /gluten type of recipes

i recently found out i have allergy to wheat but i find i am okay if i dont have too much of it.  i am looking for a recipe to make sandwich bread . . . low gluten content, low wheat.  The last six months i have been making gluten free bread and cookies using a few flours like chich pea flour, sorghum flour, coconut flour, quinoa flour and my favourite . . . almond flour.  But i would like to try something new adding just a tad bit of wheat/gluten and see how i feel in terms of my allergies.  i am thinkng i can mix a little multigran flour to my gluten free flours or maybe even try rye or spelt.  i dont know.  Anyone have any ideas or a recipe that they can share? 

elight's picture
elight

Here is the spelt sandwich loaf recipe that I have created and am currently using. I am still working to refine it, and suggestions are welcome.

195g white spelt
195g whole spelt
65g vital wheat gluten

218g water, warm
42g honey
1 egg

2 Tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons active dry yeast
9g table salt

In measuring cup, add water and honey and mix with fork to combine. Sprinkle yeast over top, and mix again to hydrate yeast. Let sit for 10 minutes while yeast proofs (should be foamy on top). Meanwhile, measure out all dry ingredients in bowl of stand mixer and combine on lowest speed with paddle attachment. Melt butter in small bowl or coffee mug in microwave. When yeast mixture is foamy, add egg and beat lightly, then add melted butter and mix together.

Add wet ingredient mixture to dry ingredients in mixer bowl, and mix (still with paddle) on lowest speed for 30-60 seconds, just until everything is combined and hydrated. You may need to scrape down paddle once or twice. Switch to dough hook and knead for 2 minutes on lowest speed. Form into rough ball with hands and place into bowl sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit for about 45 minutes until risen.

Remove dough to lighted floured countertop and gently degas with hands, forming into disc (dough should still be about 1/2" thick). Fold sides toward center to form a ball, turn over, cover with upside-down bowl, and let rest for 10 minutes. Turn over again, and flatten again, this time into a rectangle. Roll up and place into loaf pan sprayed with nonstick spray. Spray plastic wrap with nonstick spray and cover until fully proofed (dough should be well above the top of the pan - but be careful not to overproof). Pre-heat oven to 375 F.

Slash loaf straight down the middle, place on center rack, and turn over down to 350 F. Bake 20 minutes, rotate 180 degrees, and bake another 20 minutes. Loaf is done when internal temperature reaches around 195 F. Let cool 1 hour on wire rack.

Note: Vital wheat gluten is pretty necessary for this loaf to get a good rise. I am wheat intolerant but don't have a problem with it. White spelt flour can be hard to find locally; you can make this with all whole spelt and it will turn out nicely, but you'll probably want to add another 10-12g of water.

Doolan's picture
Doolan

Hi there ....i am just starting my rye culture in the pantry now for the first time and wonder if you know if i can use your lovely recipe above without the yeast  and just use my rye starter instead....i can then do a trial and error as to whether the wheat gluten will have me bedridden as wheat flour does xx i understand that if i use a soughdough process of long fermentation the gluten effect on certain people is reduced...i wont die...so that is a plus xx so hard to find a yeast free/wheat free recipe without actually having to go down the whole gluten free road as rye is such a wonderful flour that i tolerate fine xx

elight's picture
elight

Sure, any yeasted recipe can be converted to sourdough. You just have to make sure that you do the proper calculation to maintain the same hydration.

For what it's worth, I have been tweaking this recipe more, and now am doing 200g of each spelt flour and 50g of VWG, at a total hydration (accounting for the honey and egg) of 62%. Usually only need to bake 35 minutes, but depends on the dough temperature going into the oven; I try to pull it between 185 and 195.

I should note two other things:

1. A sourdough bread DOES have yeast... it's just the yeast (in your starter) are "wild" as opposed to commercially produced. I don't know anything about yeast allergies, but thought you should be aware of this.

2. I know there was a link posted (either here or maybe sourdoughhome.com) a few months back to a scientific study that showed the sourdough fermentation process eliminated most of the harmful effects of gluten for some people that are allergic/intolerant. Although my problem is wheat, I gave sourdough wheat bread a shot for a week or two and found that it was still problematic for me.

3. The rye starter might affect the rise of your bread. I am also currently experimenting with one, and although I haven't tried it in baking yet, it does not appear to be a "strong" starter. You might be better off feeding your starter with spelt (which is still "weaker" than wheat in my experience).

Good luck!

Farzana's picture
Farzana

For some odd reason, I just saw your reply!  Thanks so much for taking the time to send me your above recipe.  Yes, unfortunately, the wheat gives me terrrible eczema and occasional tummy aches/constipation :-(    I have decided for now to avoid it completely and planning on seeing my allergist in the future.  Sure hope I can try this.  Sounds great.  For now, I am sticking to making gluten free vegan recipes.  Just made a chocolate muffin and apple buckwheat muffins !  They turned out wonderful!  My husband couldnt believe it was gluten free.  Finally, I can have something for breakfast ! LOL . !

Doolan's picture
Doolan

Thank you elight ...yeah mine at day four has flopped....thanks for your reply too...have you tried water kefir at all? I am wanting to bake the lovely all spelt german bread Dinkel Walnussbrot but may take a while xx

elight's picture
elight

Have never tried water kefir. What is it - just some sort of probiotic water?

elight's picture
elight

If it is only wheat and not gluten, I strongly recommend trying spelt! You can adapt most wheat recipes to it, it is readily available (most every grocery store now sells whole grain spelt, although white spelt remains hard to find), and is both cheaper and produces better results than gluten-free baking, in my opinion.

Doolan's picture
Doolan

Water kefir is a grain that ferments to make probiotic drink or starter for baking but really hard to find here in australia fresh...also there is milk kefir which i guess is for yougurt ...still cheaper than the probiotics at chemist ...