The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

All purpose to whole wheat hydration convertion.

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flyingbaker's picture
flyingbaker

All purpose to whole wheat hydration convertion.

I've been scowering the web comparing recipies that use all purpose flour on the one hand and whole wheat on the other other. I also found a post that seem to explain that when you convert from all purpose you use the same amout of flour but add 5 teaspoons of water for each cup of flour you use.

All these figures and recipies seem to indicate that you should increase the hydration from all purpose to whole wheat at about 8% for baked breads. Does this make sense? If I mill my own wheat does that change the ratio any?

Thanks for any insight

The Flying Baker ;) (Jeffrey)

jcking's picture
jcking

Hey Jeffrey,

Here's the formula I use; AP protein level minus WW protein level, times 0.03, times total water. It's easy to place in a spreadsheet.

AP % protein = A1 (cell)

WW % protein = A2

Total Water = A3

Water Adjustment = A4  ((A1-A2)*0.03)*A3

Protein levels may vary in different brands of flours so that's why the formula is set up this way. This formula is set up for flour and water weight in grams.

Jim

flyingbaker's picture
flyingbaker

How do you get protein level's I get whole berries and grind and I didn't find anything on the bag.

jcking's picture
jcking

Many whole wheat flours are listed as 14% so start there.

Jim

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

My conversion method is 1-2 tsp. for each ounce of AP flour replaced with whole wheat flour....mostly I go by the feel of the dough though as those amounts can change depending on the season and the weather...so I use them as a rough estimate.

Janet