The Fresh Loaf

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Wholemeal Options; Wood-fired Baking on 30th January 2012

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ananda's picture
ananda

Wholemeal Options; Wood-fired Baking on 30th January 2012

Wholemeal Options; Wood-fired Baking on 30th January 2012

After the success of Friday’s Farmers’ Market I had no bread in the house; none at all!   I spent a bit of time at the weekend building up my wheat levain and rye sourdough, and looked at my flour stock and decided to make a few loaves with my lovely Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal at the centre of attention.

Two formulae offered below; a Pain au Levain made with Marriage’s Organic Strong White flour in a wheat levain @ 20% and Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye flour in a Rye Sourdough @ 5% on flour; the remaining 80% is the aforementioned Wholemeal.   The second offering is a yeasted dough @ 90% Wholemeal, with the other 10% being Strong White in the wheat levain which I used as a pre-ferment.   More detail below:

Refreshment Regime

a] Wheat Levain

Day/Time

Stock [g]

Flour [g]

Water [g]

Total [g]

Saturday 18:00

40

50

30

120

Sunday 09:00

120

100

60

280

Sunday 15:30

280

200

120

600

Sunday 18:30

600

500

300

1400

 

b] Rye Sourdough

Day/Time

Stock [g]

Flour [g]

Water [g]

Total [g]

Saturday 18:00

30

30

50

110

Sunday 09:00

40

60

100

200

Sunday 15:30

200

120

200

520

 

  1. 1.    Wholemeal Pain au Levain

Proved in 6 Bannetons; 3 small Boules, 1 large Boule and 2 Miches

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

640

Water

12

384

TOTAL

32

1024

 

 

 

1b. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

5

160

Water

8.3

266

TOTAL

13.3

426

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

32

1024

Rye Sourdough [from 1b]

13.3

426

Marriage’s Strong Organic Wholemeal

75

2400

Salt

1.4

45

Water

50.7

1622

TOTAL

172.4

5517

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

71

-

% wholegrain flour

80

-

FACTOR

32

-

 

Method:

  • Calculate water temperature needed for DDT of 28°C.   Combine Rye Sourdough, Water and Wholemeal in the mixer, then autolyse for one hour.
  • Add the Salt and Wheat Levain and mix with the hook attachment for 6 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down, rest for 10 minutes, then mix a further 2 minutes on first speed and 30 seconds on second speed.
  • Bulk proof, maintaining the dough temperature @ 25°C for 3 hours with S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale and divide; 3 @ 500g, 1 @ 1000g and 2 @ 1500g.   Mould round and rest covered for 15 minutes while preparing bannetons.   Re-mould and place upside down in bannetons.
  • Final proof 2 hours
  • Score the tops of each loaf and set to bake in the wood-fired oven.   Small loaves baked for 30 minutes, large for 45 and miches for 1 hour.
  • Cool on wires.

 

  1. 2.    Panned Wholemeal Loaves

Not that long ago, if anybody had forced me to restrict myself to one type of bread only, this is the one I would have chosen.   Now, I’m not so sure; however, today’s offering from the oven is one I am really pleased with.   The leaven is there as a pre-ferment such as a biga, though yeast level in the final dough is not very high really.   No fat used!

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

10

160

Water

6

96

TOTAL

16

256

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

16

256

Marriage’s Strong Organic Wholemeal

90

1440

Fresh Yeast

2

32

Salt

1.4

22

Water

65.6

1050

TOTAL

175

2800

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

10

-

% overall hydration

71.6

-

% wholegrain flour

90

-

FACTOR

16

-

 

Method:

  • Calculate water temperature needed for DDT of 28°C.   Combine Water and Wholemeal in the mixer, then autolyse for one hour.
  • Add the Salt, Fresh Yeast and Wheat Levain and mix with the hook attachment for 2 minutes on first speed and 4 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down, rest for 10 minutes, then mix a further 1 minute on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.
  • Bulk proof, maintaining the dough temperature @ 25°C for 2 hours with S&F after 1 hour.
  • Scale and divide: one small tin @ 4900g, one large @ 950g and 4 pieces @ 340g for the Pullman Pan.   Mould round and rest 15 minutes, covered.   Shape and pan the dough pieces.
  • Final proof @ 18°C for 2 hours
  • Bake in the wood-fired oven.   Small loaf for 30 minutes, large loaf for 45 minutes and Pullman Pan for 1 hour.
  • Cool on wires.

 

Last photo: Alison arrived with the jar this afternoon, and Faith posted me the tub around a week ago...must be Borodinsky time once more!

It’s turning cold here in the UK now, with Thursday looking rather perishing.   Hopefully I’ll be baking more bread and keeping warm…or trying to anyway!

ps. Just found these lurking on my pc.   Baking makes me smile!

 

Happy Baking!

Andy

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

What a great load of loaves.  So beautifully orchestrated and very nicely written formula's.  I feel like I've just been to a bread baking class reading and soaking it all in : )  It all sure makes my plain ol' maple and oatmeal breakfast pan loaves seem plain...well, they were pretty darn tasty and I got my daily dose of oats. 

Great to hear all is going well at the Farmer's Market and BTW...you have a wonderful smile..you smile with your eyes, great photos!

Sylvia

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Sylvia,

I know some here may not quite see this, but most of the bread that I make is to me, what you describe as "plain" bread.   Although I think I prefer "simple" to "plain", which has an ordinary conotation to it.   It really is about coaxing flavour out of hydrated and fermenting flour isn't it?   Apart from a bit of salt, what more is needed to make great bread?

Your kind comments are much appreciated

Very best wishes

Andy

 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

When I find the home is low, or out of bread, I bake 2 loaves--3 smaller ones at the most--and I am content. How many do you bake when the inlaws are expected?!

And, of course, they all look great--almost equal to the smile.

Regards,

David G

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi David,

Freezer stock in need of replenishment to build up for February's market, and I'm now looking to build sales in the village too...more meetings tomorrow on this.

I'm hoping to make 18 boules type loaves and maybe 6 panned loaves for each of my twice weekly bakes as I move forward.

The "in-laws" don't really trouble my production schedule; I just take a loaf along when we go to visit!

Best wishes

Andy

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Beautiful loaves, Andy, it’s no wonder at all that they disappear!  Nice to see the mixed-leaven loaves again, I’ve been hooked on that method lately and really enjoying the results.  Your wholemeal version looks brilliant! 

Marcus

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Marcus,

Thank you for your ever-generous words.

The use of a small amouynt oryr sourdough fitted perfectly here.   I wanted to keep wholegrain right up as high as possible, but didn't want to use less than 20% strong white flour in the pre-ferment.   adding an extra 5% pre-fermented flour as dark rye seemed the perfect answer!   I don't use wholewheat in a starter at the moment, although I am interested in looking at Desem now.

All good wishes

Andy

PiPs's picture
PiPs

No doubt your customers are smiling as well.

Lovely bake Andy and great to hear the markets went well. The wholemeal loaves look delightful. Does the small amount of yeast have softening effect on the crumb of the panned loaves?

Have fun with the cold weather ... Are you baking those days?

Cheers,
Phil

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Phil,

You know, the wood-fired oven is a delight actually.   I baked the panned loaves first, no fat in the formula and yet ended up with a perfect crust for this type of loaf.   Then I baked the boules and miche on the sole of the oven and watched the loaves sit up beautifully as they baked on the bricks.   Yes, for sure the yeast must have that effect as it just provides a boost to fermentation.   I really tried to stretch out the fermentation time by choosing a cooler area for the final proof.   Nonetheless, ferment time for these loaves was still around 2 hours less than the pain au levains.

Interested to read your reflections on dough temperatures in your last post; I have been thinking much along the same lines this last couple of days.   It should help if I bake in the coming icy blasts, which seems likely.

Thank you for your comments Phil, it's good to hear from you as always

Best wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

and nice loaves.  As always I admire the way your boules open along the scores.   Great to hear about your success at Farmer's market.   It makes sense to me.  Don't read Russian so wondering what that tub is.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

Yes, the scoring opened up very nicely as the loaves sat up on the oven sole.

I'm hoping that the tub contains Red Rye Malt; it is coarsely ground and the aroma from it is intense.   Borodinsky paste currently sitting in bulk next to the fire!   I don't read Russian either.   Faith very kindly brought this back form a recent trip to Russia, and it arrived by post just a few days ago.

Very best wishes

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Beautiful Wholemeal breads, Andy! Very healthy choice. Your commitment to baking is amazing!

Stay warm!

 

ananda's picture
ananda

We are really looking to keep the "white" to an absolute minimum in our household these days Khalid.

Thank you so much for your generous comments

Very best wishes

Andy