The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hobart c100 Owners Question

tjated's picture
tjated

Hobart c100 Owners Question

Hello all. I have a Hobart c100 and am trying know more about it. First, some background. I bought it from ebay two years ago. It was in a bit rough shape, but came with the latest service records where it was disassembled and regreased. Since it was already repainted in a two-tone color, I completed stripped it down to metal, cleaned, and repainted it. I also replaced the original plug...wow I can't believe they made it with that originally.

Here it is:

I am trying to correctly age this mixer. The best guess I have is 1960's due to the rounded feet. It didn't come with a serial number :( so that's tough, but I did get an extremely good deal and it came with a splash guard, bowl, and authentic c100 dough hook.

Also, I am concerned with some movement when mixing, I think it may be from some looseness with the dough arm connecting to the drive, creating an unbalanced situation, but not sure.

Hoping other c100 owners can help with these questions, and maybe I can be helpful, too, with other questions about the mixer.

Thanks for taking a look!

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

onesharpstore.com

phxdog's picture
phxdog

tjated,

Nice job with the paint! I have a c100 that I think was built in the mid 1950's. Runs like a tank, however I too, have noticed it's a bit wobbly where the dough hook meets the shaft. Perhaps that wobble is designed into the units?

My Hobart has a VERY heavy 3/8" by about 14" round base plate (rather than 'feet' like yours) and seldom walks unless I'm working with pretty stiff doughs over 2000 grams. I also find if I'm working on a solid surface (built-in counter vs. island) I get a lot less movement of the mixer.

I've got a huge slicer/shredder attachment that looks like a pelican and a nice wire wisk, but I wish I had your splash guard!

Phxdog (Scott)

PhilipG's picture
PhilipG

wow, I too have a C100 but I want your splash guard. I would also check out the Hobart site and send them an email under the Contract Us button. Tye might be able to ball park it based on description. Mine was made in 1954. Same year my wife was born, except that she in only 39. Hmmmm good luck. I have the shaft wobble too. Was wondering if it is-because the dough hook is a bit worn? may just be built that way. Enjoy!

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

My problems with an old Hobart were unsolvable until I called the sales rep at onesharpstore.com   The woman who answered was knowledgeable, helpful, in good humor and didn't try to sell me anything.  They seem to have a lot of parts from old machines, the splash guard maybe?

ken mitchell's picture
ken mitchell

I have had a C100 for several years. I mix 10 lb. batches of bread in it with King Arthur all purpose flour with no problem. This mixer will not handle large batches using high gluten flour. As far as walking goes, my mixer has feet like yours and will walk when in 2nd speed. I have put my mixer on a metal table that has been bolted to the wall in my garage. On top of the table I have bolted a 1 inch piece of ply wood the size of the table top. I have cut out slots that match the feet, the feet fit into these slots and stabalize the mixer with no problems.

Good luck

 

Ken

tjated's picture
tjated

Thanks a bunch everyone! I appreciate the information and insight into this historic mixer. It seems that the wobble in the dough arm must be normal. Also, Ken, you mentioned that by supporting and stablilizing the feet into  a stronger base it will take care of the walking or vibrating. I do have it on an island. 1st gear is usually all I do because 2nd gear with a serious batch of dough is, well, scary.

The splash  guard is nice... on many occasions it's saved loose ingredients from getting flung around the kitchen.

I do love this mixer. Does any one know about how often to have it regreased? I have a brick oven and make pizza and bread about 12-15 times a year. So I believe for these mixers, that's not a lot of run time. When was the last time anyone had theirs regreased? Did you do it yourself?

Thanks again for the info.

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

I promise you that I don't work for these people:  find onesharpstore.com on the internet and call them.  If they don't have all your answers, I'll be surprised.

I promise never to write this again for fear you'll think I'm their agent.  I'm really not.  I'm just passing on my happy experience with them.

 

 

ken mitchell's picture
ken mitchell

Hi

Even though you have your mixer on an island, it will walk around on the top of the island unless stabilized some how. As far as mixing in first gear, that is ok if you are doing stretch and fold to develope the gluten. I incorporate the ingreadients for 2-3 minutes in 1st gear then develope the dough in 2nd gear for 4-5 minutes for an improved mix. I take of the guard after incororporation and do not use it in 2nd gear. All the guard does is prevent flour and liquid from being thrown out of the bowl prior to total incorporation.

 

Ken

tjated's picture
tjated

I know the mixer itself weighs in around 100 pounds, but I guess to have more confidence in using the 2nd speed I'll have to build a stand that would be more stable. I have no idea what that would look like, but I guess it also would have to be fairly heavy, too.

 

I notice the dough tends to slap around more(in 2nd gear), is that what you see too?

phxdog's picture
phxdog

Yep,

I get that 'slap' of the dough in 2nd (& absolutely in 3rd) gear. To me it sounds like doing the French Fold technique, slamming down on the counter,  just a lot less work for me. When I need lots of gluten development, that old mixer is hard to beat.

tjated's picture
tjated

I did email the people mentioned in the previous post and they very quickly replied. Without a serial number it s hard to know the exact age, but they did say it was probably around 50 years or so. Does that sound about right? Anyway, I am getting ready for to fire the brick oven and mix up the biga for some bread this weekend. Thanks for the inforegarding the c100. :)

ken mitchell's picture
ken mitchell

As far as using 2nd and 3rd gears for bread, for most bread using white flour, 4-4.5 minutes is sufficient to develope the dough in 2nd gear. This will give you what is referred to as an improved mix. If a lot of stretch and folding will be used a lesser mix time would be ok.In my opinion 3rd gear should not be used for bread. The slapping is normal and is the main cause of walking. When the hydration % goes up, the slapping subsides quite a bit.

Ken

 

dlighttexas's picture
dlighttexas

Take off the rear motor cover (one center screw) and look at the edge of the rear cover. The serial number should be etched there. Send it to me at dlighttexas@gmail.com and I will look at my date sheet and tell you when your mixer was made. Mine was made in 1954. Also - NEVER mix bread dough in 3rd speed unless you like to repair stripped keys inside the transmission. Not leaking oil?  Good advice to leave it alone as the Marfak #2 they used back then was a lot better than current day lubricants in my opinion. dlighttexas

scm's picture
scm

Hello,

I'm new here and I need some brake down pictures for re-greasing the gears because the old grease has broken down and is dripping out. Does anyone have photos of the job?

Thanks so much.

dlighttexas's picture
dlighttexas

SCM:

It is a little tricky getting inside a C-100. I have a parts breakdown that clearly shows the gears and their proper location, but best to do it w/ the mixer upside down after first removing the planetary 1/2" bolt, the drip ring and slipping the planetary off. It will be hard at first as the large "O" ring holding the cover will be tight, so get a short piece of slotted metal "lumber" from Home Depot and drill out one of the holes large enough for the center shaft to slip through, then take 2 - 2" 1/4-20 bolts and fender washers and attach this to the cover using the two outside tapped screw holes that are made for this. Take a sledge hammer or a lead-shot hammer and pound away from one side to the other. Note: Be sure to take out the 5th allen head scres towards the back of the cover as this is holding it in place. The planetary ring gear (best to remove it first) has 4 screws and the back screw makes 5 that you should have in your box holding all take-off parts. If you pound this off w/ the mixer feet on the ground be ready for the cover and two sets of gears in a cluster to fall out on the ground as a whole. Make a soft landing w/ some old towels or a mashed box and paper towels. There are a few tricks to getting everything back in as a whole, but not as bad as the 5 qt. mixer! I use an Exxon #2 general purpose grease since the Marfac #2 isn't available anymore - 4 tubes or so and replacement "O" rings are available from Hobart but no planetary seal so either put your sealed bearings back in or get two new 203 sealed bearings from Graingers or a local bearing supply house for the planetary. The cover inside "O" ring (67500-20 I think) is tricky to get straight so the refitting of the cover doesn't pinch off a piece of rubber, but just watch it. Try to keep the two sets of gears together as a whole assembly - just wipe them down and set them aside while you clean out the old grease. Be sure to get it from all the nooks and hiding places. If the #10 attachment hub slips out, make sure you put this back in before reassembling or you will have to take it back apart to insert. All in all not too bad but you will need all of a Saturday afternoon. Be prepared w/ new "O" rings - one for the shifter shaft, one for the attachment hub nose if you take it off, one for the cover outside and one for the inside as this is where the broken down grease will leak through. Have 4 or 5 tubes of grease and squeeze three or so in the newly cleaned-out transmission case, then insert the two sets of gears together seating them in their proper holes or bearings if the bearings stayed behind, then top off open areas w/ the remaining grease. Hobart probably has a chart somewhere that tells you the proper amount to sgueeze back in, otherwise just fill it up without forcing too much in. It will distribute itself around. Put a small dab of grease on the planetary gear for lubrication but not too much or it will make a squishy noise that will go away shortly. Good luck. Dlighttexas

Iron Rose Farms's picture
Iron Rose Farms

I own a C100 and Dlighttexas' detailing of the tear down is awesome... and oh so helpful. But I need more help.

My C100 has had a relatively easy life as it was in a church kitchen, it's primary duty was whipping cream and mashing potatoes... When we got it it ran like a top but then simply wouldn't turn on. It makes no noise or anything. We looked for anything burnt or disconnected without any immediate signs. Wondering if you Dlighttexas, might have suggestions on what to check first and maybe how. Not sure what I should get when testing each component... now also as I have been searching I find that pulling the switch plate out (as we have) often causes the gear lever to loose it's key... so I may very well need the above description of tear down unless there is an easier way to re install said key? Many thanks for any help as we miss our mixer!

dlighttexas's picture
dlighttexas

Hello:  I am presently waiting for a new stainless bowl for my C-100. If it is as good as I am hoping, they can be had for less than $200.00 delivered. I won't know for a few weeks yet.

Tired of the tinned bowl w/ dents, rust, etc...

Yimyammer's picture
Yimyammer

Hey dllight, I just found an old C-100 for a hundred bucks I'm trying to restore.  My bowl was rusted and pitted as heck, so I did a search and found this site:  http://www.metalcoatingcompany.com/cleaningservices.html  and they're saying they can re-tin it for $25 on the website (I've sent pictures and am awaiting confirmation).  Given the value of these bowls, if the shipping isn't too costly, its probably worth the trouble.

I'm assuming this mixer needs a #10 meat grinder attachment, if so, have you (or anyone) run across a place to get one of these?

Looking forward to following your restoration