The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sprouted Wheat Sourdough Boules

bakinbuff's picture
bakinbuff

Sprouted Wheat Sourdough Boules

Hi Everyone!  I have tried two times to make a sprouted wheat sourdough boule, and both have tasted lovely and looked amazing, but unfortunately were very very wet, despite using all my usual techniques, times and temperatures.  I can only assume that the ground sprouted wheat flour must hold more moisture and need a much longer baking time?  The first time I was taking the loaf with me out of the house so couldn't put it back in the oven, but the second time I cut it, discovered it was too wet still (after cooling period of course), so popped it back in the oven for awhile.  That helped, but overall the result was still much too moist and just generally very weak structure once I started to cut it.  I realize a loaf that isn't fully baked will have this problem, so I am hoping that giving a much longer baking time at slightly lower temps will sort out both issues.  Just wondering, does anyone else bake with sprouted, ground flour?  (I sprout the wheat berries myself over about 3 days, dry out and grind).  Thanks in advance for any replies.  :)  Pic of second boule below...

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Did you dry the sprouts in the oven, at say 200 degrees, before grinding?  Maybe you could let the bread bake longer and develop a darker crust too?

bakinbuff's picture
bakinbuff

I did dry out the sprouts the first two times, at about 80-90 degrees F for a couple hours until totally dry then ground them in a hand cranked grain mill.  I tried again, this time sprouting for only 24 hours so that the tips were just beginning to emerge, then ground them wet in my cuisinart food processor.  The only trouble I had was that I had only a little strong flour left and had to use mostly plain flour to add to the dough.  The baked loaf was still a little on the wet side even though I baked it about 50 minutes instead of my usual 35.  It was also not very well risen, though I definitely put that down to having to use largely plain flour instead of strong bread flour.  Will post and pic, and try again!  :)

 

linder's picture
linder

This link to a previous post seemed interesting re: sprouted wheat bread

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6677/100-sprouted-wheat-bread

 

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

The effects you describe (wet and sticky crumb, and probably gummy too) is typical of an excess of alpha-amylase activity (due to sprouting). This enzyme breaks starches to sugars and dextrins, preventing the gelatinization of the starches and the formation of a crumb as we know and like it.  You could have baked your bread for 24 hours in a row and still you would have obtained that wet crumb.

Probably you should reduce a lot the amount of sprouted flour in your bread. I've never seen a recipe requiring  more than 4% sprouted flour.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

RobynNZ sent me this great link on sprouted grains and breads, in this case 80% sprouted spelt with 20% whole spelt to make a really nice loaf of bread.  It also has the water buzzed with raisins too!

There are all kinds of sprouted breads up to 100%, not just spelt too.  I am amazed what great bakers like Larry can do with just about anything .  Maybe not as inventive and daring as Ian but still ......

http://www.farine-mc.com/2012/12/larrys-sprouted-spelt-felicitous-case.html