The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hobart D 300

goer's picture
goer

Hobart D 300

Is it a good mixer or not? Don't know much about mixers. Thanks

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

That depends on its condition.

If it's brand new, then it's at least as good, if not better than, the competition. I can buy 3 mixers with an equal or greater power:capacity ratio for the price of a single Hobart D 300.

If it isn't brand new, expect no one to tell you the truth about its condition. It would be not unlike buying a used automobile–or in the case of a Hobart mixer, a used bulldozer. If it breaks, you can have confidence that it can be repaired, but at a cost not unlike the original price, which is steep.

goer's picture
goer

A used bulldozer. That's funny. What 3 mixers would beat the Hobart? It's used and I've done a little more digging. I might have to pass on this one. Still it's good to check other sources first. Thanks.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I meant you could buy 3 other mixers for the price of 1 Hobart. 

There are a lot of Chinese-manufactured mixers that are very high quality, but priced far below the price of a Hobart.

You could get a brand new 30 qt mixer from Centaur or Globe for 1/3 of the price of a Hobart, for example.

http://www.restaurantsource.com/centaur-refrigeration--restaurant-equipment/bakery-equipment/mixers/ProdDesc-MAC30-46895.aspx

Not sure about the price of a new 30-quart Hobart (I don't think they sell the D 300 anymore), but they're much more than $2500. I think they were $6999 last time I checked Hobart's pricing.

goer's picture
goer

Got a new twist. The D-300 is $1,200 +. Also found a local Hobart 8200 for $495.00. I figure the 8200 is a 20qt. I figure I could get extra 20qt bowls if need be. What do you guys think? I'm just batting ideas around at the moment. Truth is I want a mixer bad, but would love a big fork mixer or table top artofex. Thanks everyone. Love this place.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

A good condition working Hobart 30 quart mixer is a great mixer....if it is the size you need.  You can contact Hobart with the serial number and they will tell you when the mixer was manufactured.  It can be hard to determine the condition of any used mixer.  Ask the current owner how long they have had it, how it has performed, has it needed repair and why are they now selling it.  You can also buy rebuilt mixers from Hobart dealers and these often carry at least a 90 day warranty.

Jeff

t-man's picture
t-man

i'm in the process of opening a small italian bakery/pizzeria.  it wil be take out only.  i need some help choosing a mixer.  i have an opportunity to buy a hobart 60 quart used for a good price.  my only concern is if this will be too large of a mixer.  i plan to make one batch of specialty loaves (~30 loaves) and one batch of pizzas (30 large) on a daily basis.  that is just a guess for when i start.  i could probably get by with a 40 quart, but the price is so good on the 60 that i am considering it.  is there any reason NOT to go for the 60 quart?  i need to jump on this ASAP if i want it... can anyone comment on using the 60 quart for smaller batches of dough?

gerhard's picture
gerhard

Go for a 60 quart and if you have 3 phase electricity get a 3 phase motor.  It is not just the bowl size that is important but the power.  The Hobarts have a thermal cut off switch and mixing dough near capacity of the bowl can trip that espicially on the smaller mixers.

 

Gerhard

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Take note of the power requirements for the mixer.  If it requires 3 phase and you do not have 3 phase you may be looking at a very expensive proposition in terms of electrical upgrade.  Other than that, if the 60 qt. is in good shape and reasonable priced, I would get it.  The batch size you describe would be ideal for this mixer without pushing the limits of  its capacity.  Best to get a slightly over sized mixer and treat it gently than to overload a smaller mixer and kill it.  You CAN break a Hobart mixer, have no doubt about that.  They will take an enormous amount of use but will break under abuse such as overloading.

A batch of 30 loaves will require a 60 quart mixer unless they are small loaves.

Good Luck with the project,

Jeff

t-man's picture
t-man

thanks for the comments... sounds like a 60 is the way to go.  i need to do some more research on the eletricity aspects.  do they even make a single phase 60 quart?  i'll have more details tomorrow, but i think they said it was an "820 volt" or something like that- i know it was 8 something, and the hobart rep said that was an advantage.  i'm sure it's a 3 phase- that's another issue, we don't have a location picked yet.  so, yes, i'm taking a gamble there.  it's just that the price is right- they are asking a price that is more in line with the 30 and 40 quarts.  and it's a single owner, 5 years old, and not used at all in the last two years.  i'm guessing it was very lightly used considering the business they are in.  going to look at it tomorrow.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

I think that the 60 quart mixer is either 220v two phase or three phase.  Three phase requires a third hot wire coming to the building that 99.9% of residential services do not have and is found in only some commercial applicatons.

Should you get this mixer and find that it is initially too large capacity wise, you can get an adapter to use 40 quart bowls with the 60 qt. mixer.

Jeff

gerhard's picture
gerhard

I would not worry about the bowl size unless you are making very small batches.  The 60 quart mixer can do a dough using a maximum of 50lb of flour and does a fine job of doughs using 20 lb of flour.  I took a quick look at the electrical options for the 60 quart mixer and attached a screen shot straigh from Hobarts site.