The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Looking for flour expertise in China

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Axel's picture
Axel

Looking for flour expertise in China

I am located in China and currently use "Lam Soon" flour from Hong Kong, such us Golden Statue.

I need your expertise in comparison of different types of bread flour from this company. I want to find an optimal flour blend for baguette.

Thank you for your time.

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

I'm also located in China. I've been using Lam Soon Bread Flour with success in many breads but just not on baguette. It always turns out too chewy. 

For baguette - I've tried mixing 50% Gold Medal Bread + 50% Gold Medal Plain.  perhaps you can try.  I'm still trying to find the right flour for baguettes too.  Just bought Francine (French flour with 9.8% protein) in Cityshop.  Going to try that soon.  will keep you posted on this.

Axel's picture
Axel

Hi Jenny, ( may I call you Jenny ? )

Gold Medal and French flour are quite expensive for me. I buy Golden Statue brand , Whole wheat and Mei Mei ( cake Flour ) for a good price. I buy a few large bags at a time.

Tomorrw I will try 50 % bread flour + 15 % w.w. + 35 % Mei Mei flour. Bread flour is about 14 % gluten ( I think ) cake flour is 8.2 % gluten and I put 15 % sifted whole wheat for balance and water absorption. Fingers crossed.

Axel

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Hi Axel,  let me know how it works out.  I have not tried Mei Mei flour yet.  if its good,  will buy a sack of it. 

yeah - gold medal is really expensive. only limited to certain breads that I make now.  I actually buy whole sack of golden statute - 22.5kg. use it within 6 months,  got a good price from my friendly local grocer.  just did a ciabatta yesterday using golden statute and it turns out really well. 

all the best and happy baking!

mauricechun's picture
mauricechun

Hi Jenny,

I am located in Hong Kong and looking for a say 25 lb sack of bread flour .  Perhaps the golden statute suits me fine.  Wonder if you could tell where to buy it.  I am using 1kg bags of Japanese flour @HKD15.  Need to replenish too often.

When I reduce the amount of  wheat in making wholemeal bread, the loaf gets smaller and hardened. Is it necessary to reduce the amount of water to prevent this happening?   

Regards

Maurice 

 

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Hi Maurice,  I'm not familiar with the shops available in HK.  you may try the dry goods store,  or call Lam Soon directly on where you might be able to get it by the sack.  In China,  I get a sack for RMB 200 per sack,  slightly cheaper than what you are paying for the Japanese flour.  But I know in HK,  you are spoilt for choice, ie,  you probably can get other types of flour cheaper.  I had not much choices here,  and its ridiculously expensive,  Japanese flour is RMB38 per kg.

For the wholemeal bread,  you might want to do some search,  you will find that for wholemeal or rye, you probably need more water than less.  And it'll be better if you autolyse to get better results.  try searching for other recipes here,  there's many who had experimented by mixing white (bread) and wholemeal flour very successfully.

Good luck on your find for flour in HK!

grace tang's picture
grace tang

Hello there,

I used to live in Hong Kong (Causeway Bay)  and had luck buying good quality bread (high gluten) flour by the sack at the neighbourhood dry grocer (it is on a side street behind the South Pacific Hotel) for less than $200 (2 years ago) and they even delivered for free!    The only thing is they don't speak much English....Another place you can try is a baking supplies store called "Phil Baking", they have stores in Wanchai, Yau Ma Tei and the New Territories.  They sell a wide range of flour mainly from Taiwan and Japan.  Prices are reasonable too, sure beats Citysuper and the other high end food stores.   Worth checking out for other baking supplies too.  Here is their website - http://www.twinsco.com/GenCategory.php?cat_id=17.     (Only in Chinese, I am afraid).

Hope this is useful.

grace tang's picture
grace tang

Hello there,

I used to live in Hong Kong (Causeway Bay)  and had luck buying good quality bread (high gluten) flour by the sack at the neighbourhood dry grocer (it is on a side street behind the South Pacific Hotel) for less than $200 (2 years ago) and they even delivered for free!    The only thing is they don't speak much English....Another place you can try is a baking supplies store called "Phil Baking", they have stores in Wanchai, Yau Ma Tei and the New Territories.  They sell a wide range of flour mainly from Taiwan and Japan.  Prices are reasonable too, sure beats Citysuper and the other high end food stores.   Worth checking out for other baking supplies too.  Here is their website - http://www.twinsco.com/GenCategory.php?cat_id=17.     (Only in Chinese, I am afraid).

Hope this is useful.

mauricechun's picture
mauricechun

Hi Grace, It is very kind of you to share the information. I have been buying the flour from the Wanchai Phil Baking store. Their price and quality are acceptable to me.  I learn from this site about the lam soon brand and want to try it too. I found it from an old style grocer near wanchai rd (where there are some shanghaiese grocers). once i decide on the most desirable brand, i will buy a sack.  the bread machine i bought through taobao works alright so i make the wholemeal bread quite often these days for my breakfast.  I am curious about the shop near south pacific hotel (a pity they closed the singalong cafe at the top floor about 2 years ago).   

mauricechun's picture
mauricechun

Hi Jenny, Thanks for your reply. I am a beginner in breadmaking. I need to do more research. I have been trying to get the best mix of white and wholemeal flour.  2:1 seems OK to me.  I found a shop that sells lam soon flour a few days ago.  I am pleased to note that the bread comes out much puffier than the japanese flour.  the size of the loaf is about 20% bigger i.e. higher in the tall pan of my machine.  It is harder to slice, of course.  I still need to learn to control the water content of the bread i make. It tends to weigh heavier than the whole meal bread i buy from the supermarket.  it is fun to fine tune to suit ones taste.