The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Organic or non-organic

Rudolph's picture
Rudolph

Organic or non-organic

Having made two bakes of 100% rye wholemeal sour dough this week, one using organic and the other non-organic flours. I got, in an idle moment, to comparing their nutrional content as posted on the packets. I was surprised to find that in every category the non-organic flour seemed to surpass that of the organic flour. Only in the amount of fibre present did the organic score higher than non-organic. The former scored 13.7 grams while the latter scored only 11.7. In all the other categories the non organic contained the higher amount of energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates. They tied with the saturate fat content at 0.3 and while the organic had 0.05 grams sodium, the non-organic admitted to having only a trace. Is organic flour really better value for us especially when you consider the difference in cost. I would be interest in your opinions on this.

Rudolph

TinGull's picture
TinGull

Organic doesn't always just mean the nutritional contents are higher.  In a lot of cases, it will be...but in some cases products will get "fortified" with other ingredients to make the nutritional facts look better.  What you HAVE to remember is that organic really is better for you.  There is NO risk of ingesting harmful pesticides or other cancer causing chemicals, and organic farming is a sustainable practice which will leave the earth in prime condition for planting 10, 20, 100 years down the road where soon those mass agriculture fields will just be chemical waste lands. 

For my money, I always buy as organic as possible (about 80-90% of what I eat is organic) and I grow my own vegetables, buy local milk and cheeses and as much local grains as possible (Im in the midwest).  Organic is by far the better way to go if you want to support the small farmers and if you want to support the earth that we all share.  It's not just about the nutritional contents.

Rudolph's picture
Rudolph

Tingull,

Thanks for your reply, I was interested to hear your views on this, While I have not quite bought into the orthodoxy of organic food production, I do, however, have some sympathy with your viewpoint, I neglected to say that I bought what I  assumed to be non organic rye in Britains largest  chain of health food shops so I would not expect it to be adulterated. I suppose it might well have been organic but it didn't state it anywhere on the packet. The organic rye flour was purchased at a supermarket and was from DOVES FARM organic grain. www.dovesfarm-organic.co.uk

Best Regards

Rudolph

tigressbakes's picture
tigressbakes

tingull,

 we are like-minded people. I could have written the post exactly as you did!

My sentiments exactly.

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

It also depends on the grain. If the type of wheat grown is a different strain or blend then it will contain different nutritional values. Just as srpring wheat has more protein than winter wheat etc.

 

Organic Is better as it isnt covered with chemicals and fungicides that we could be ingesting.

 

Thegreenbaker 

browndog's picture
browndog

Such good points everyone raises. Although most of us are not in a position to effect large-scale positive change on the planet, we certainly wield power as consumers. For those of us with the privlege of choice, every choice we make in the market place is an ethical one nowadays.

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Thanks tingull, I couldn't have said it better. We're in Ohio and grow some of our own food and search out others who grow and/or sell organic. It just makes sense in so many ways that I don't know why people have to be convinced. Of course there are charlatans everywhere but I think if we learn and if we keep it simple it's not hard or expensive to choose organic. Just my opinion.                                                                    weavershouse

TinGull's picture
TinGull

Browndog...we may not be able to change anything with just 1 person, but with lots of people joining together to continue the organic food movement that has begun, we can certainly do good to change things  :)

 

As for buying things in the UK...the UK has much stricter food standards as a whole than the US does.  I wasn't even aware that the UK had an organic enforcing agency like the USDA is here.  Here, we have chickens dying from disease in massive farms and then they get ground up only to be fed to the other chickens!  Same goes for beef.  And then those diseased animals make their waste, it gets washed down brooks and streams and into the irrigation for the massive corn, wheat, beans farms and that gets into our food supply.  The food supply in the US is awful.  If the government here would wake up and realize that with such a centralized food supply, its a prime target for bioterrorism, then things could be much different.  That's one MAJOR reason now-a-days for buying organic, especially in the US.  

I'll step off my soapbox now....