The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Does anyone have a good low-fat cornbread recipe?

Gary Lam's picture
Gary Lam

Does anyone have a good low-fat cornbread recipe?

Does anyone have a good low-fat cornbread recipe they would be willing to share?  Thanks,

Gary Lam

Molokai Hawaii

 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Try substituting pureed fruit (applesauce) for the oil in a regular cornbread recipe. I usually just use the recipe on the back of the cornmeal box and add a little brown sugar. It will be moist but prob will stale faster.

Gary Lam's picture
Gary Lam

Thanks for the suggestion.  I once used applesauce in a cake recipe and it turned out well.

FoodFascist's picture
FoodFascist

Hi Gary,

my family's most favourite bread is a sourdough version of this recipe.

Here's my version (makes 3 loaves):

  • approx. 80 g whole wheat starter at 66% hydration
  • 210 g plain white wheat flour
  • 685 ml water
  • 315 g polenta (that's 30% on total flour)

this makes the sponge

 

for the dough,

  • 3-4 tablespoons honey
  • 2 heaped teaspoons salt
  • 5-6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 400 g strong wheat flour
  • 125 g plain white or whole wheat flour (my whole wheat is a low-gluten variety), or spelt

Now as you can see I do use a sizeable amount of olive oil, plus I oil the worktop when stretch and folding, but you could easily cut the oil to whatever level you require. Maybe use some egg yolk instead, for a softer loaf.

 

Gary Lam's picture
Gary Lam

Sounds like a great recipe.  I look forward to trying it.

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

trying to get my head around the idea of "good" and "low fat" in the same sentence.  ;-)

Paul

Gary Lam's picture
Gary Lam

It is certainly a challenge.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Whenver I hear "cornbread" I think the person means the kind made with baking soda or baking powder and is baked in a cake pan. My previoius post refers to the baking soda variety. I usually use the recipe on the back of the cornmeal box but because I like mine sweeter, I add brown sugar to the recipe. I have known people that use applesauce instead of oil. It does turn out but may be a bit more dense and a little more crumbly the next day.

Low fat can still be delicious. It's doubtful that both low fat and low carb can be, though.

FoodFascist's picture
FoodFascist

oops... I didn't even think about the yeast vs baking soda issue. Apologies!

that bread i posted is delicious though, whether made with sourdough or commercial yeast. Try it if you have time

Gary Lam's picture
Gary Lam

When I posted my question, I was thinking of a quickbread, so your applesauce suggestion is on point.  FoodFascist's recipe, though a yeast bread, also sounds delicious, and is a welcome response.

Issa's picture
Issa

I consider PR's recipe in the BAA to be low fat.  Seriously, the only fat in it is 2TB butter and the tiny bit of milk fat in buttermilk.  Regular buttermilk is actually lower fat than whole milk and I use 1% Buttermilk so that is even lower.  When you compare the amount of fat grams in his recipe to say a recipe that uses 3 or more TB oil (olive, canola, etc) it's hard to beat.

EvaB's picture
EvaB

1.5 cups flour sifted with about 4 tsp of baking powder, 1 cup corn meal, (scald the corn meal in boiling water) (scalding pour boiling water about 1/2 cup over the cornmeal in a bowl let sit to soak and cool some) put the flour in a bowl, make a well in center of the flour, (of course you can add salt and sugar if you want I never add sugar as it wasn't growing up and rarely salt because of bacon grease for the shortening) break the egg into the well and start mixing, adding in the scalded cornmeal and then the 3 tablespoons of bacon grease melted but not red hot, mix if too thick add a bit of water until its semi pourable, should be thicker than cake batter but thinner than biscuit dough! Pour into a greased cast skillet or greased cake tin, bake at 375 to 400 F for about 35-40 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Never did she put in milk, or buttermilk or anything other than water. They did have cows and milked but she never made bread with milk, or biscuits or cornbread, or pancakes, it was only water. The food never suffered and she always could make things even if she didn't have milk.