The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Mixing bowls

janetgayle's picture
janetgayle

Mixing bowls

I am fairly new to homemade bread. I have a bread machine which makes a pretty decent loaf but I want to hand make my bread.  I have stainless steel mixing bowls which are pretty lightweight.  Does anyone have any suggestions as to good mixing bowls for bread making?  I have been considering Mason Cash bowls or Emil Henry.  Any input would be appreciated.

Dotmakesbread's picture
Dotmakesbread

I was wondering how the bread machine works.  Does it knead and cook or just knead like a mixer?   I use the Kitchen aid right now and have made very good white bread (in the past Italian, pepporoni and onion bread).  I still knead some by hand before actually shaping the bread, but not much.  Most done by the Kitchen aid.

janetgayle's picture
janetgayle

I have a Zojirushi bread machine and it mixes, kneads, and bakes a traditionally shaped loaf of bread.  I works great and makes a very nice, high loaf.  I usually make whole wheat with honey and molasses instead of white sugar.  It tastes great! I, however, want to try my hand at really handmade bread.

yy's picture
yy

Stainless steel mixing bowls are very useful. However, glass bowls give the added advantage of being able to see the aeration in your dough as it ferments. I often mix in stainless steel bowls and then transfer to glass bowls for bulk fermentation. My only reason for mixing in stainless steel bowls is that they're lighter, so I can put the bowls directly on my scale and zero out the weight without going over the scale's capacity. 

In my opinion, those fancy enameled Emile Henry-like bowls are unnecessary and offer little functional benefit (however, they are often a charming decorative addition to the kitchen). They're also a lot less budget friendly than glass bowls. 

bnom's picture
bnom

I love my vintage yellow ware (a type of ceramic) bowls  (perhaps because my mom bought me one when I first started baking bread 40 years ago). While somewhat less practical than glass or stainless,  they give me pleasure everytime I use them. And I use them a lot!  I say   go for something that you love to touch and look at. 

janetgayle's picture
janetgayle

Your vintage bowls are beautiful.  I love pottery!  Probably glass bowls are more practical for me unless I find a good buy on some stoneware or earthenware ones.  I thought a heavier bowl than the stainless steel would be good for bread dough because it would be more stable on the counter. I also agree with going with something you love to touch and look at!

bnom's picture
bnom

Craigslist or eBay or the thrift shop.. I think I have 7 bowls now that all nest and don't think I ever spent more than 15 bucks for one. Pottery is wonderful. You only need one to start but collecting them is quite fun. I think you'll find bread making a great hobby for a lifetime. So if you're looking at bowls consider "is this something I want to grow old with?".
Just the musings of an old lady ;)