The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Feeding starters

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bobku's picture
bobku

Feeding starters

How much effect does the feeding ratio of sourdough starter have on the sourness of the final dough. I know slow cold fermentation will make dough more sour as well as a firmer starter. As far as feeding a starter goes will a 1:1:1 ratio make the final dough more or less sour than a  1:3;3 ratio, or have no effect, everything else being equal ?

jcking's picture
jcking

Are we talking storage starter? If so healthy maintenance is key. Strive for a balance of yeast and bacteria. If the storage starter is fed 1;3;3 it would take longer to reach its peak as opposed to 1;1;1. Any attempt to develop more sour should be done with the building of the starter into the amount needed for the formula. An easy way to increase the loaf sour is to add a slice of the bread from the last sour dough bake.

Jim

bobku's picture
bobku

I'm talking about starter that is kept on counter to bake with in a couple of days. Basically using a healthy starter, would feeding it a larger amout of flour and water 1:3:3  as opposed to 1:1:1  over several days contibute to making dough more sour less sour, or have no effect at all, everything else being equal (when you build to amount needed in the formular which feeding would result in more sour, less sour, or have no effect)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Not all starters are equal.  With the next feed you could try both at the same time and do your own test.  :)

bobku's picture
bobku

I thought this might have been something that was common knowledge among experenced bakers. I guess I'll just have to try it out

jcking's picture
jcking

The 1;3;3 as opposed to a 1;1;1 should only effect the time it takes to peak. Leaving the starter out past peak would increase bacteria/acid/sour and decrease yeast activity. You could split the starter (when building) and allow one half to mature past its peak (at 1;1;1) to develop the acids and the other half later (at 1;3;3;) to have fresh strong yeast activity. This would develop more sour if that's what is desired. You could also adjust hydration to effect sour. Amounts of ash will also increase sour. Ash is increase by using a portion of whole wheat or rye flour.