The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Please help recreating Joël Robuchon's mini french baguettes

  • Pin It
proxy's picture
proxy

Please help recreating Joël Robuchon's mini french baguettes

Hi everyone, I was hoping you help me recreate Joel Robuchon's mini french baguettes. I have had them many times in l'atelier in Las Vegas, and I think it is the tastiest baguette I have ever had.

This is what they look like:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/yummyinthetummyblog/2651452924/lightbox/

I have looked for the recipe for years, all over the internet with no luck.

Any help or suggestion would be greatly appreciated! even if you haven't had this particular bread, maybe you can suggest the best recipe for this kind of a bread.

yy's picture
yy

Those baguettes are indeed really good, and almost too adorable to eat. I remember them being about four inches long or so. It was the only restaurant I've been to where I requested a box to take the rest of the bread basket home. My impression of the baguettes was that it wasn't any different from any other standard French baguette:

-thin, shatteringly crisp crust, probably thanks to the right amount of steaming during baking

-irregular crumb that is moderately open

-wheaty and sweet taste/ aroma

I doubt the formula they use is distinct. These were just executed very well. The hardest part of recreating them would probably be in the shaping (true for any baguette). I was impressed with how consistent the tiny baguettes were. Hats off to whoever supplies them to the Atelier. I would suggest using Hamelman's formula for baguettes from "Bread" (either the poolish or the pate fermentee version will work), refining your shaping skills (more easily said than done), and filling the oven with plenty of steam in the beginning of the bake. Same rules as for any other good baguette. 

proxy's picture
proxy

those baguettes are sooo tasty, when paired with butter, that I have to try very hard not to fill up on them.

You're right, shaping them is very challenging. I tried to bake these mini baguettes twice.  Not only I wasn't able to reproduce the flavor and crust like they do, but also my baguette shapes were really inconsistent and funny looking.

I will research and try Hamelman's formula, in the meanwhile, if anybody else has any specific insight and tips to achieve these baguettes, please do share in this topic.

thank you.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

If you can't find one you like, his recipe can be found in The Complete Robuchon.

 

dwhite0849's picture
dwhite0849

I use a French Baguette dough.  After bulk fermentation,I generously flour a work surface, and being careful to degas as little as possible, shape it into  a 7" x 7" rectangle, gently cut into 5 strips...roll each slightly in the flour, again gently...do not lengthen or degas.  Then I take my 3 hands (well I wish I had them)  and place them on the peel so they won't stretch.....550 deg preheated oven, stone, steam...no slashing....turn down to 450 degrees....peak through the glass in my oven door for 10 - 12 minutes until I think they might be too done....

DonD's picture
DonD

I baked these a while back and they were inspired by Robuchon's rolls. There is really no secret,  the dough is a basic poolish baguette dough and it is all in the shaping. From my experience, baguette is the most difficult bread to master.

Don

 

proxy's picture
proxy

Those look really good Don, how did you shape them to be perfect and sharp on the edges?

DonD's picture
DonD

A regular baguette is approximately 300 gms of dough so use about 100 gms for the mini baguette. Preshape the dough into a cylinder about 4 inches long. Roll and stretch to about 7" long and taper the ends w/ the palm of your hands into pointed tips. Proof for 45 mins and score before baking w/ plenty of steam for the first 10 mins.

Don

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

That's how I'd approach the shaping.

I'd make a baguette as I usually do and then cut it three; then, I'd taper the ends.

Here's a video from King Arthur Flour on shaping baguette. It's a very helpful video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuQ5K9eLfJ0