The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Italian Little Taralle Cookies (Taralluces)

linder's picture
linder

Italian Little Taralle Cookies (Taralluces)

Christmas baking continues today with taralluces - little taralle cookies.  My Grandmother Rinaldi used to make these and taught my Mom how to make them.  Mom would make them for special occasions like Christmas.  The recipe is pretty straight forward.  The hardest part is getting the cookies shaped prior to baking because the dough is rather sticky and requires a quick and steady well-floured hand to roll a small 'snake' of dough and tie in a knot.  Here's a picture of the shaped cookies prior to baking -


After baking the cookies expand quite a bit and before they are iced and sprinkles added, they look pretty non-descript -


Once they are completely cooled, the cookies are dipped in confectionary sugar icing and sprinkles are added.  These cookies are so light but flavorful - they disappear really quickly.
The recipe -

Taralluces (Little Taralle Cookies)

3 Eggs
3/4 cup Sugar
1/2 cup Milk
3/4 Crisco, melted and cooled to body temp (do not allow to solidify)
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp lemon extract(or use all vanilla if you prefer)
3 cups All purpose flour
3 rounded tsp. baking powder
For icing:
1 pkg confectioners(powdered) sugar
1/4 cup milk
1/2 tsp lemon or vanilla extract(your choice)

In a stand mixer -
Beat eggs well.  Add sugar and milk gradually.  Continue beating.  Add Criso, beat.  Add extracts and beat.  In a separate bowl, mix flour and baking powder.  Add the flour mixture 1 cup at a time, beating on low speed just to incorporate after each addition.  Dough will be sticky.  Flour your work surface and hands well.  Take about 1 TBSP of dough and roll into a 'snake' shape about 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick and 3-4 inches long.  Tie the dough rope into a knot as if for knotted rolls.  Place on cookie sheet, leaving at least an inch between cookies.  Bake at 400F for 7-10 minutes until bottom is lightly browned.  Removed from oven and place on cooling racks.  Allow to cool completely. 

For icing: in a small bowl, add vanilla and milk to the confectioners sugar a little at a time until a smooth icing about the consistency of cold molasses is achieved.  Dip the to of each cookie in the icing and set down on a rack under which waxed paper has been placed to catch the drips.  Immediately sprinkle with colord non-pareil sprinkles.  Let dry overnight before putting in a plastic container or cookie tins for storage.
Yield: Approximately 7 dozen cookies

Enjoy with a cup of tea or coffee, or just by themselves but be careful, they are addictive.

taurus430's picture
taurus430

This recipe looks like it might be similar to Anginetti, a light Italian cookie with lemon icing and sprinkles that I know from Aunt Josephine. Do you know about Anginetti? My Aunt use to make them and they were only known as "Italian Cookies" till I did an Internet search and found the true name. Now DW makes them and they are so good!

Rob

linder's picture
linder

Hi Rob,

Could be the same cookie - I didn't get the recipe from my Mom but found it online and thought it was much like hers.  When she died I received her cookie recipes and in there was something very similar to these that she had labeled anginetti.  Tomato - tomahto - they're all good!

Linda

taurus430's picture
taurus430

The Italian Moms and Grandmas were not good at keeping recipes. They are/were the best cooks. A little of this , a handful of that as my Mom use to tell me. I managed to get some recipes from my Mom before she passed, but not all. Thanks to the Internet, we are finding these. My Grandma was the best cook and baker, but had nothing written down. Checkout Youtube and Grandchildren are making videos of their Grandmas cooking popular Italian dishes.

Rob

linder's picture
linder

Rob,

So true, the only way I got a recipe for Pizza Chiena was to watch my Mom as she made it and estimate what amounts she was using.  The recipe came out pretty well considering.  Given how the best cooks and bakers made dishes, I always laugh when we sometimes get overly analytical in our recipes. They knew the food by heart, how it should look, how it should taste and that's what they used as their guides.

Linda