The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Francesco Elmi Panettone

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Francesco Elmi Panettone

After seeing txfarmer make this recipe, which I'd not seen before, I decided to give it a go. It's slightly different from the recipes I've tried from the cresci book by Iginio Massari but the overall balance of ingredients is similar. I scaled down the recipe to make one 500g panettone (actually 600g to account for mixing loss). I deviated slightly adding a few drops of Aroma panettone and some extra water. I also glazed it. Other than that it's the same.

Natural yeast cross-section:

I kept the yeast as instructed at around 28C feeding three times at 3-4 hour intervals.

First dough after mixing:

I dissolved the suagr completely in water and added half the yolk. Added the flour and leaven and mixed on minimum speed until the bowl was clean and the dough was a ball on the dough hook. Added the rest of the yolk in two stages waiting for the bowl to come clean each time before finally adding the butter in pieces. Then turned out onto a butter rubbed counter. Note I never mixed above minimum speed!

Second dough before adding fruit:

Mixed the first dough with flour until smooth before adding the rest of the ingredients including seeds from half a vanilla pod. Again I never mixed above minimum speed!

Completed second dough:

Adding the fruit always makes me worry as the dough breaks up! But after resting it was strong again. Final dough weight was 584g.

Finsihed article:
 

Crumb:
 

Formula:
 

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

really excellent oven spring and crumb structure. I guess you are italian, am I correct? What flour did you use?

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I'm very much in love with Italy, its culture, history and beautiful countryside. I have some possible italian decent, my grandad looks a bit mafioso. As for flour I used Canadian flour.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

And it looks as if tastes good, too.

Karin

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Thanks. It has a wonderful aroma too.

bakinginQuito's picture
bakinginQuito

that is congratulations......your panettone really looks perfect nevertheless....if I use a sourdough recipe that takes almost 3 days i try to make about 3 panettone of 750 gr each....perhaps cause i'm quite glotton....happy baking and thanks for sharing with us. Paolo

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Thanks. I tend to make individual ones because I have had great number of failures and it has taken long time to get here. I am now more confident in the process and actually decided to make a big batch yesterday. 2Kg worth!

I even made a video of me folding up the first dough after mixing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O92LLT8O6Ls

wildeny's picture
wildeny

The butter percentage in Elmi's receipe is 56% (700g butter vs 1250g flour)*, which is almost like a broche. The sugar is about 44%.

I recall that panettone is an enriched bread that is not very sweet nor too rich. For instance, the recipe here contains only 18% of butter. I wonder which one is more authentic in Italy.

(EDIT) * From the video, I notice that 400g natural yeast is acutally a biga, which includes 1 part of yeast (should be biga as well), 1 part of flour and 0.5 part of water. Therefore, the butter percentage should be slightly less than 50%.

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

it's as buttery as you can imagine, and even more. Basically it's a way to make raise a lot of butter:)

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I'm not sure you can get a recipe anymore authentic given the source. I've tried, and am aware of many recipes / formulas from Italian pastry chefs and they all have this level of enrichment.

Your calculations seem a little off. I've already done them if you look at the table I included. Bottom right shows the total ingredients - it accounts for the flour and water contributed by the sourdough.

There is no commercial yeast in this recipe, you are confused.

 

wildeny's picture
wildeny

I just notice the list of total ingredients in the bottom right. The butter is about 52.7% of flour weight.

I didn't mean "commercial yeast", and it's the English translation in the the video (the bottom right) which says the natual yeast consists of 1 part"yeast". It is the Ensglish translation that confused me. But later I gathered that is actually a biga (see my previous comment).

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Well, it's not a biga either. It's the mother dough (lievito madre). 'Lievito' translates as 'yeast'.

eugenerella's picture
eugenerella

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the great morning coffee eye candy. I'm sitting here waiting for my panettone to warm up from an overnight rest in the fridge and enjoying your notes. I also never go over 3-4 on the Kitchenaid. I'm experimenting with a new recipe  with mini portion size for gifting( http://www.lepetrin.fr/recettes/brioches/panettoncini-panettoni-version-mini-mimi/print/ )  I found on Le Petrin that intrigued me. ( drawn in by the great photography )  This is your second post that I came across some new - which is cool. What's aroma panettone ? Second,  do you grease your molds? Third, do you invert for cooling? Finally your great parting shot - whats your glaze? Thanks another one hit out of the park.

Gene

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Hi Gene.

Aroma Panettone

Paper moulds? No I don't, there is no need to. If you're asking because you want to remove the paper after baking and cooling, then it comes off easily if the dough is mixed well. Yes I invert after baking - this is necessary to prevent it from collapsing. Recipes that use mostly or all whole eggs will likely not require inverting.

I posted the glaze / icing here

Thank you for your complimentary words.

Michael

eugenerella's picture
eugenerella

Hi Mike,

 

Here's todays results  Gene

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mwilson's picture
mwilson

Looks very light and delicious!