The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Shoyu-Roasted Seed Bread; Pain de Campagne; Ciabatta; Rossisky, Panned Wholewheat Bread

ananda's picture
ananda

Shoyu-Roasted Seed Bread; Pain de Campagne; Ciabatta; Rossisky, Panned Wholewheat Bread

Shoyu-Roasted Seed Bread; Pain de Campagne; Ciabatta; Rossisky, Panned Wholewheat Bread

This baking session took place over 3 days, beginning on Saturday at the start of the weekend, ending Monday afternoon.

I didn’t have any wood prepared, so the breads were baked in my SMEG electric oven.   I mixed the doughs on Saturday evening and retarded overnight, then baked off throughout Sunday.   The hunt for wood is now complete; I am ready to collect tomorrow!

I used both rye sourdough and wheat levain in each dough.   Each culture was given 3 refreshments from Friday night through to Saturday evening, each beginning with 40g stock.   I ended up with 900g of wheat levain and 600g of rye sour.

Formulae, recipes and methods shown below:


 

  1. 1.    Shoyu-Roasted Seed Bread

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Built Wheat Levain

 

 

Carrs Special CC Flour

10

150

Water

6

90

TOTAL

16

240

1b. Built Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

12

180

Water

20

300

TOTAL

32

480

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a.]

16

240

Rye Sourdough [from 1b.]

32

480

Carrs Special CC Flour

65

975

Allinsons Strong Wholemeal

13

195

Shoyu-Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

8

120

Shoyu-Roasted Sunflower Seeds

8

120

Shoyu-Roasted Sesame Seeds

5

75

Shoyu-Roasted Blue Poppy Seeds

5

75

Salt

1.8

27

Water

50

750

TOTAL

203.8

3057

 

 

 

% overall pre-fermented flour

22

-

% overall hydration on flour

76

-

% seeds to flour

26

-

% wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

15

-

 

 

Method:

    • Weigh all the seeds into a roasting dish, mix through by hand, sprinkle over with shoyu, and roast under the grill until well-browned.   Turn the seeds in order to prevent burning.   Set to one side.
    • Weigh the rye sourdough, white and wholewheat flour and the water into the mixing bowl.   Attach the dough hook and mix 3 minutes on first speed to combine.   Cover and autolyse for 1 hour.
    • Add the salt and wheat levain and mix for 2 minutes on first speed.   Scrape down and mix a further 2 minutes on second speed.   Add the seeds and mix for 5 minutes on second speed until the dough is developed to pass the window pane test.
    • Retard the dough overnight in the chiller.
    • Bulk proof for 1 hour, then stretch and fold.   Rest 15 minutes.
    • Scale and divide: I made 2 loaves in bannetons @ 500g and 1 @ 709g and four pieces @ 337g for a panned loaf in a Pullman Pan.   Mould all the dough pieces round and rest, covered, for 20 minutes.
    • Re-mould the loaves for bannetons, brush tops and sides with water, and dip in a mixture of all four seed types.   Place upside down in prepared bannetons.   Shape each piece, repeat method for dipping in seeds and place sideways on in the Pullman pan.   Set to prove.
    • Proof for 3 hours, covered.
    • Bake the hearth loaves with steam in a pre-heated oven [280°C for one hour] at 235°C for 10 minutes.   Switch over to the convection setting, and bake at 210°C [30 minutes for the large loaf and 20 for the smaller ones.]   Load the Pullman Pan at 250°C with generous steam.   Drop the heat to 200°C and bake out for 1 hour.   De-pan.
    • Cool all the breads on wires.

 

 

  1. 2.    Pain de Campagne

Firstly, apolgies for using 2 decimal places for the % in the formula.   It just took me a while to get it to balance.   Using a factor of 13.1 really did not help!

 Sadly, no French flour in the formula, but we tasted this bread for lunch, just 3 hours after baking, and it tasted so good.   The new electric oven gives such a great crust!   The photographs demonstrate very good crumb quality too.

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Built Wheat Levain

 

 

Carrs Special CC Flour

28.63

375

Water

17.17

225

TOTAL

45.8

600

1b. Built Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

1.37

18

Water

2.29

30

TOTAL

3.66

48

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Built Wheat Levain [from 1a. above]

45.8

600

Built Rye Sourdough [from 1b. above]

3.66

48

Carrs Special CC Flour

45.8

600

Allinsons Strong Wholemeal

20.53

269

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

3.66

48

Salt

1.76

23

Water

49.31

646

TOTAL

170.52

2234

 

 

 

% overall pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

68.78

-

% wholegrain flours

25.57

-

FACTOR

13.1

-

 

Method:

  • Weight the water, rye sourdough and the flours into the mixing bowl.   Use a hook attachment and mix on first speed for 3 minutes.   Cover and autolyse for 1 hour.
  • Add the levain and salt and mix two minutes on first speed and 7 minutes on second speed, scraping down the bowl as necessary.   The dough will pass the window pane test.
  • Retard the dough overnight in the chiller.
  • Bulk proof for one hour the stretch and fold.   Rest 15 minutes.
  • Scale and divide: I made one loaf @ 950g and one @ 1284g.   Mould round and rest 15 minutes.   Re-mould and place upside down in prepared bannetons.
  • Final proof for 3 hours.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Tip out each loaf, score the top of the loaf and set on the baking stone.   Apply steam.   Bake at 235°C for 15 minutes.   Turn the heat down to 210°C, move to convection setting and bake out a further 30 minutes for smaller loaf and 45 minutes for the larger one.
  • Cool on wires.

 

Leaven and sour had been rebuilt over the course of Saturday and Sunday ready for more dough to be mixed Sunday evening for baking off on Monday.   I made the following:

 

  1. 3.    “Wholemeal” Panned and Boule Loaves

Made with a white wheat levain at 25%, and the remaining 75% of the flour is wholemeal, added to the final dough.

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Built Levain

 

 

Carrs Special CC Flour

25

333

Water

15

200

TOTAL

40

533

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Built Levain [from 1 above]

40

533

Allinson’s Strong Wholemeal

75

1000

Salt

1.8

24

Water

54.8

730

TOTAL

171.6

2287

 

 

 

% overall pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

69.8

-

% wholegrain flours

75

-

FACTOR

13.33

-

 

Method:

  • Combine the water and flour in the mixing bowl, and mix on first speed using the hook attachment for 3 minutes.   Autolyse for one hour.
  • Add the levain and salt, mix for 2 minutes on first speed and 7 minutes on second speed until developed.   Scrape down as required.   The dough should pass the window pane test.
  • Retard overnight in the chiller.
  • Bulk ferment for one hour with one S&F.
  • Scale and divide: 4 x 390g pieces for a “four-pieced” Sandwich loaf in the Pullman Pan, plus the remainder made as a “Boule” in a round brötform.
  • Mould round, then rest 20 minutes.   Shape and place dough pieces in tin/brötform.
  • Final proof 3 hours.
  • Bake the boule in a pre-heated oven with steam, at 250°C no fan, for 10 minutes.   Switch to convection and bake at 235°C for 20 minutes, then drop to 210°C and bake out a further 15 minutes.   For the Sandwich loaf, load the oven pre-heated to 220°C, use steam, and bake for 1 hour with the lid on.
  • Cool both loaves on wires.

 

 

  1. 4.    Ciabatta

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Built Wheat Levain

 

 

Carrs Special CC Flour

28.125

180

Water

16.875

108

TOTAL

45

288

 

 

 

1b. Built Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

9.375

60

Water

15.625

100

TOTAL

25

160

 

 

 

2a. Final Dough -Bassinage

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a above]

45

288

Rye Sourdough [from 1b above]

25

160

Gilchesters Organic Ciabatta Flour

62.5

400

Salt

1.72

11

Water

35.47

227

TOTAL

169.69

1086

 

 

 

2b. Final Dough

 

 

Bassinage [from 2a above]

169.69

1086

Water

11.25

72

TOTAL

180.94

1158

 

 

 

% overall pre-fermented flour

37.5

-

% overall hydration

79.22

-

FACTOR

6.4

-

 

Method:

  • Combine levain, sourdough, flour, salt and water for 2a in the mixing bowl. Attach the hook and mix for 2 minutes on first speed and 5 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down as needed.   Add the remaining water, attach a paddle beater instead of the hook.   Mix 1 minute on first speed, then 3 minutes on second speed to let down the dough.   Retard overnight in the chiller.
  • Give 3 stretch and folds to the dough and bulk proof 1 hour.
  • Scale and divide 4 pieces just short of 290g.   Gently shape into the “slipper” shape, and set to proof using a heavy linen cloth.   Scatter well with Semolina, and create channels for the loaves to prove “en coûche”.   Final proof 2 hours.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C for 1 hour.   Set the first 2 loaves onto the bakers stone, apply steam and bake without fan at 250°C for 6 minutes.   Switch to convection and drop the heat to 235°C for 10 minutes.   Finish a further 2 – 3 minutes at 220°C if necessary.   Repeat with the other 2 loaves.
  • Cool on wires.

 

  1. 5.    “Rossisky” Russian Rye Bread

Using all rye flour and the 3-stage process.

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Built Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

120

Water

50

200

TOTAL

80

320

 

 

 

1b. Soaker

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

60

Red Malted Barley Flour

5

20

Salt

1.5

6

Boiling Water

35

140

TOTAL

56.5

226

 

 

 

2. Sponge

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a above]

80

320

Soaker [from 1b above]

56.5

226

TOTAL

136.5

546

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Sponge [from 2 above]

136.5

546

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

50

200

TOTAL

186.5

746

 

 

 

% overall pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

FACTOR

4

-

 

Method:

  • Make the soaker 3 hours ahead of use.   Pour the boiling water onto the flours and salt and stir thoroughly to mix.
  • Combine the soaker and sourdough to form the sponge.   Ferment overnight.
  • Add the remaining flour to form the final paste.
  • Bulk ferment for 1 hour, covered.
  • Shape with wet hands and drop carefully into a pre-lined baking pan.
  • Proof for 3 hours.
  • Bake for 1 hour 15 minutes at 160°C with steam on the convection setting for the oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

Notes.

  • The seed breads are full of flavour; my friendly neighbours across The Square persuaded me to let them buy one of these loaves.   They were back again today having eaten the whole loaf, and back to buy some of the ciabatta.
  • The Pain de Campagne has lovely crust and crumb.   The flavour is not over-powering, but deep and complex thanks to using a combination of 2 leavens plus generous amounts of wholegrain flour plus overnight retard.   My ideal “everyday” bread; can be used for any type of eating experience.
  • The wholemeal bread was a pleasure to make.   The grist is 75% wholewheat.   The crumb is lovely and soft and light too; ideal for sandwich bread.   Plenty of oven spring evident too!
  • The ciabattas have turned out well, as they are genuinely only made with levain, no yeasted Biga in site.   There is high proportion of pre-fermented flour, and the rye component of this makes up nearly 10% of the total flour too!   Additionally, the Gilchester Pizza/Ciabatta flour could hardly be described as “White”.   It is milled beautifully fine, but quite a lot of goodies have evidently been retained when milling.
  • No photos of the Rossisky, sorry.   It was last out of the oven, and I lost my chance to get decent photos as the light goes away very quickly round these parts in the depths of autumn.   It ended up a lovely dark colour, with pronounced sweet and sourness; always a highly flavoured bread.
  • These loaves [or some of them, anyway], are bound for a “Wine Tasting” evening over at nearby Ingram Hall on 2nd December.   The couple hosting the event do much of the marketing and selling for Doddingtons Cheese, which is made just a few miles up the road from where we live.   I met them at the Powburn Show and they seemed keen to try to forge links for the future.   Time to telephone them and let them know what I have managed to produce.

Best wishes to all, and, Happy Baking!

Andy

Comments

codruta's picture
codruta

Andy, such a pleasure to see what you've been baking lately (and I have in mind all the bakes from the last 2 weeks!). I have such good feeling everytime I open your posts. The crumb of pain de campagne is amazing, transluscent and silky... and that Shoyu-Roasted Seed Bread is fantastic. I'm not surprised your friends ate a whole loaf in one day :) The quality of your breads is evident, and it's admirable the effort you put to make them and then to share such detailed formulas with us. 

As always, all the good wishes to you!

codruta

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Codruta,
Your kind and generous words are much appreciated. It is a pleasure to post these formulae and to share the detail with keen and committed bakers such as you, here on TFL....and to follow their work too
Best wishes
Andy

varda's picture
varda

So much baking.    I have to focus.   So I choose your Whole Meal Panned and Boule loaves.   Fabulous.   I don't recall seeing these before.   The Pullman version looks awesome.    I will try this.    Wonderful variety of breads.   And it is possible to bake inside.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

How true, Varda...but!

I now have plenty of wood stored underneath the oven, and the next levain build underway!

I need samples to take to commercial outlets and persuade them to buy!!!

Yes, I think there is a good variety of breads here which will work as true accompaniment to awesome local cheese.

Lovely to hear from you

Best wishes

Andy

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Andy just a tip in case you hadnt thought of it you can put the wood for the next fire in the chamber when you have finished baking to really dry it out and it will burn really well with less smoke too

Derek

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Derek,

Thanks for the tip.   Now I actually have some wood, I can store some of it in the dead oven to dry off a little more.

I've laid my hands on building off cuts, and a few pallets, which I'm busy breaking up.

That must be an 80 quart Hobart isn't it?   So do you prefer to mix dough in the spiral, or the upright?   I prefer spiral myself.

Thanks for commenting with kind words, and for re-posting the mixer photos; sorry I think I forgot to get back to you on the last post.

Very best wishes

Andy

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Another incredible collection, Andy.  The seeded bread looks amazing.  Nothing half-hearted about that loaf!

Question on the wholemeal loaf – what is the temperature of your chiller?  I’ve been trying to put together a similar panned loaf on a similar schedule but find the bread getting too sour.  I let the dough bulk ferment at about 60ºF / 16ºC overnight.  Structurally it seemed in a good place, but I wonder if that particular temp was encouraging the sourness.  Or maybe it was the butter (at about 2%)?  Now that I think about it, my lean loaves don’t usually have this problem…  WW sandwich loaves have long been my Achilles heel.  I’ll be giving your formula a try next time – your panned loaf sounds just like what I’m after.

 Marcus

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Marcus,

of course, many thanks for your kind words.

My advice on wholemeal goes as follows:

Firstly use a stiff levain with good quality strong white flour.   I use the same technique with the Gilchesters Miche.   Do not let the leaven become over-ripe.   Of course we are then in 75% Wholewheat territory.

Second, try to use good quality wholemeal if possible, although I don't think this is essential.   I would strongly recommend you use an autolyse phase, however, as that will allow for full hydration potential.   Keep the dough cool, and have confidence your leaven will be sufficiently strong to still raise your dough properly, even on the next day.   I put the dough straight into the chiller after mixing, and my fridge sits around 6*C. [Where do you find the degree sign when you write your replies?]   Use a [by extension] cool bulk ferment the next day.    And maybe bear in mind that it's a lot cooler here in the UK than where you live?

Butter...use white shortening instead to be safe, although I'm not convinced this is your problem.   I reckon 16*C is just too warm for a mineral rich wholemeal flour.

All good wishes

Andy

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you for the details, Andy.  I’ve been building my levain with whole wheat out of habit, but I’ll try switching to white flour since I use it at about 25% anyway.  The butter I can take or leave, so I’ll leave it out next time.  The dough can spend the night in the fridge and, since it’s plenty chilly here at this time of year (nearly down to freezing already this evening), finding a cool spot to finish the bulk ferment won’t be a problem.

I only have the ° symbol because I typed this in Word and copied it over. 

Thanks again, I have a good feeling about the next loaf.

Marcus

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Marcus,

I think you'll find leaven made with strong white flour will give a lot more tolerance, especially if you use it stiff, and don't mix and ferment it too warm.

Best wishes

Andy

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Wow Andy,

You and your SMEG have been busy ... and your fridge packed with dough by the sounds of it :)

I had never heard of shoyu before - just googled it. It has a salty soy sauce flavour? Can imagine how great the seeds and bread must have tasted.

Next ... the Campagne ... the two starters are working a treat together as always ... love the colour of the crust ... and what a crust! ... (any tips on how you judge the final proof to be complete, as you always get such a great bloom on the scores?)

Next ... The wholemeal panned bread ... Looks like the perfect sandwich bread ... I'll ask the same question as Marcus ... retarding doesn't increase the sourness too much? I am a bit apprehensive retarding my wholewheat breads. (any tips for scaling dough for different sized pullman pans)

Next ... the Ciabattas ... Lovely crumb ... I have only made ciabattas with a biga ... I have never been impressed with ciabattas made with a sourdough levain ... too chewy for my liking. You say they gueniely made with a levain?

.... and to top it off a Rossisky ... sigh

Hope the wine tasting evening goes well and your hard work is well received.

... it deserves to be.

Cheers,
Phil

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Phil,

Many thanks for your generous words, and sorry for being a bit slow to get back to you.

Judging proof of doughs in bannetons is always quite tough.   I usually have the following thoughts in my head:

  • state of levain used; stiff/liquid, ripe/green, active/sluggish, amount in final dough
  • dough temp and ambient proof temp
  • state of final dough, especially amount of mixing, tight/slackness of dough
  • Any bakers yeast used?
  • Keep in mind the history of the dough - was it retarded? How long in bulk? etc
  • Use your eyes; gentle poke will only tell you so much, it is much more valuable to touch the upward surface of fermenting dough, rather than the base

I think the bloom on these loaves comes from being able to really pre-heat the electric oven and use steam more effectively.   Something I have previously had to deal with and I know you have to is that your oven doesn't allow you to turn the convection off.   I think that makes quite a difference.

The wholemeal, I believe I covered most of this in reply to Marcus.   Regarding tins sizes and volume, much depends on the dough you are working with.   I use my large Pullman Pan as my base for calculating ratios.   The volume of the pan is 33cm x 9.5cm x 9.75cm =  3056.625 cm qubed, or, 3.057L of water, or 3.057kg of water.   For a white loaf I would use 1100g of dough, a high rye 1900g, so I set the wholewheat around the middle of that.   The seed bread in the previous bake was around the same weight too.

I agree with you about ciabatta being chewy with all levain.    However, that was exactly what I was looking for as the bread is to accompany full-flavoured local cheese, so I wanted the bread to have plenty of flavour, and some body too.   I'm quite happy with this, for the purpose, but for dipping in good Vigin Olive Oil, I'd be seeking good "00" flour and using a biga as well.

Take good care Phil

Best wishes

Andy

ww's picture
ww

i suspect that if i lived across the square from you, i would be lingering around a lot for bread too :)

interesting that you use shoyu to roast the seeds - any particular reason why,and does it impart any additional taste to the seeds and bread?

your ciabatta looks most chewy, must be the rye?

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi ww,

Thank you for your kind comments.

Shoyu-roasted seeds were a favourite little snack we put out in little bowls as an appetiser in the cafe/restaurant I co-ran in the late 80s and early 90s.   One of my fellow workers was a dedicated vegan, and he was well-supported by all the members committed to offering excellent vegan fayre within the all-vegetarian menu.   Think nuts which have been salted and roasted....all the flavour comes out.

Yes, the chewiness in the ciabatta was actually quite deliberate, although I acknowledge it is not entirely authentic.   However, I wanted to produce a bread with more body to it, as it is to be sampled with local cheeses made by a company who rightly boast about the full flavour of their products.   In that respect, I was really pleased with the outcome...and yes, the proportion of rye sourdough is of great significance.

All good wishes

Andy

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Andy, with all your baking and energy, you ought to be teaching classes!     Hmmm salty seeds too!   Are the seeds on the outside also preroasted?  I take it, not.   

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Mini

Yes indeed teaching...!?

Well it seems like the authorities don't really want or value what I can offer just at the moment.

Providing alternative curriculum for baking is, however, going to be a substantial part of my future business plan.

No, the seeds coating the bread went on plain; the baking process does the roasting for you.

Always a pleasure to hear from you

Best wishes

Andy

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I was attempting to be funny about the teaching as you are teaching.  How's the commute going?  The loaves are lovely!  Always look for your posts and learning more.  :)  

Mini

ananda's picture
ananda

Yes, I appreciate what you are really driving at.   Would that 16 and 17 year old cookery students were as responsive to baking passion: "I just want to cook" is the phrase that normally comes to mind.   I take a longer view, and just hope and encourage them there is a broader view as well.

Oh, and then I get on and bake bread at home!

I gave up travelling to Leeds; hated being away from home.   I have work in Gateshead, just across the Tyne from my previous haunt at Newcastle.   Not sure how long it will last, however?   There are other and more rewarding ways to teach than being enslaved to the UK FE education system, for sure!

Best wishes to you

Andy

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

It takes a lot of talent to be able to make such a gorgeous display of baked breads.  All your hard work and talent can be seen in each of your loaves.  Thank you for sharing, Andy!

Sylvia

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Sylvia,

Time to fire up the oven; 4kg of Pain de Campagne needs mixing too!

Your generous comments and support and much appreciated

Best wishes to you

Andy

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Andy,

This is what happens when you bring a commercial mixer into the home.......you mix, a lot.  Really nice.

Jeff

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Jeff,

Thank you for your kind words.

Yes, I am finding it so good to be baking more and more.   Now, of course, I have to get out and about and try and sell it!

Very best wishes

Andy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi Andy,

All of your breads look luscious!  Especially I like the Pain de Campagne's crumb, that made my mouth watering...

The roasted sho-yu seeds!!  I remember you posted the bread before..  This bread has been in my baking list.

Happy baking,

Akiko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Akiko,

Thank you for your very kind words.

It's really good to hear from you again

Best wishes

Andy

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Very very nice collection there Andy and well presented write up there too,

Not sure if i posted the pics of the Hobart that is languishing out of use, forgive me if i did already.

                           

                           

and the current working piece sitting alongside

kind regards Yozza

 

 

Franko's picture
Franko

I'm afraid I'm a bit late again Andy, but just wanted to say how good all your breads look and what a terrific range of them you've produced. I remember you doing a roasted sesame and shoyu loaf not too long ago that caught my attention back then just as this latest one of yours has. I've been meaning to try it for myself but it's the old dilemma of too many choices and not enough time to bake to even scratch the surface. I have some of the Indonesian sweet soy or 'ketjap' that I'd like to try with this flavour concept of yours. The roasting will need some extra careful attention due to the sweetness of the Indonesian soy, but the  salty, sweet and sour flavour profile of a finished loaf has a lot of promise... if I can ever get around to doing it.

Now that you have the oven part of the equation covered, both indoors and outdoors, and with a good reliable mixer to help out, I think your whole community will be reaping the benefits and not just the folks across the square. Great stuff Andy, and very good to see how all the pieces are falling into place for you.

All the best,

Franko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Franko,

The Soy Sauce you mention sounds really special.   I'm sure you will make a really great version of this when you have time to fit it in.

I'm loaded with uncertainty just now.   I'm really relating to the "Community" aspect of my aspirations that you mentioned.   Full-on business venture right now will not allow me to complete the Masters; I have to keep perspective.

Money is going to be soo tight too, of course.

Your comments are very welcome here, regardless of when you decide to post them.

Very best wishes

Andy