The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Transporting bread

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ActiveSparkles's picture
ActiveSparkles

Transporting bread

I have made a loaf of white bread and some soft rolls for my aunt and uncle. The thing is, they are going to need to survive a journey of nearly an hour. I have no idea what to do to make sure they arrive in as good a condition as they left.

I have tried a carrier bag before, but that was a disaster as it made my bread go horribly soft.

I am considering wrapping them loosely in some baking paper and placing them in a loose bag, Any idea if this will work?

 

Any ideas in general would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you :)
Charlie

Damp Patch's picture
Damp Patch

You could try a clean paper bag or cotton bag. That way the bread can still 'breath' and shouldn't go as soft.

ActiveSparkles's picture
ActiveSparkles

appreciate your help. Thank you :)

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

I use a clean paper sack with a double layer of paper towel in the bottom for regular storage on the counter in the kitchen.  We have a breadbox, but the box softens the crumb in just a few hours, whereas the sack keeps it crisp for a couple of days.  This is the life of a loaf in our house, most of the time.   The paper sack, a grocery "barrel bag", is not the most attractive storage but neither my wife nor I liked what happened to the bread in the box, so we only use the box for sweet, sandwich, and desert breads where the crust quality is not a factor. 

Good Luck
OldWoodenSpoon

ActiveSparkles's picture
ActiveSparkles

Thanks for your suggestion. Sound like great ideas, now to try and find a paper sack. Not readily available where I live sadly.

Charlie

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I tie opposite points (first one knot) then the other opposite points making a second knot to carry the loaf.  The loaf breaths through the cloth.  On the receiving end, the bundle can be set into a basket and untied, much like unwrapping a gift package.  It can also be placed in a paper bag but the cloth works just fine.  Especially good for hot loaves. 

I found something LINK that describes a little bit of what I'm talking about.  I have a couple of large squares (My mother would use flour sack cloth) and as you can see in the link they are great for casseroles and bottles of soda too.  You can also give the cloths away as gifts.  I learned this from my mother who would wrap up just about everything we took to picnics and church suppers.  

GrapevineTexas's picture
GrapevineTexas

and you obviously have been the fly upon the wall within my kitchen.  That's exactly what I do!

I use new, laundered dish towels not unlike the tea towels we all grew up using, those made from flour sack material.  I find them at Target and Walmart, King Arthur also sells them (or, they did at one time).  

Two gifts in one, and much appreciated by those on the receiving end.  

 

ActiveSparkles's picture
ActiveSparkles

That is a super method, and one I shall keep in mind with Christmas fast approaching. Seems like an ideal way to transport bread to family members as I plan to do :)

ActiveSparkles's picture
ActiveSparkles

Thanks to everyone for the help. I managed to find a pretty good shopping sack thing, and covered the bottom with a dish cloth. Seemed to work pretty well!